Communications, Culture & Society

Popular culture and communications have a powerful influence on how gender roles are perceived and stereotypes perpetuated across society. Re:Gender and its members uncover and counter misinformation providing context and analysis about the accuracy of how the daily lives, responsibilities and realities of women and girls are represented and interpreted in the media. Efforts are also focused on increasing opportunities for women commentators and opinion leaders to influence public perceptions and debate. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Unveiling the Revolutionaries: Cyberactivism and Women’s Role in the Arab Uprisings

Over the course of 2011’s momentous Arab Spring uprisings, young women in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Bahrain and Yemen used social media and cyberactivism to carve out central roles in the revolutionary struggles under way in their countries, according to a new study commissioned by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.
 
The study, “Unveiling the Revolutionaries: Cyberactivism and Women’s Role in the Arab Uprisings,” explores the activism of several key figures, including Egypt’s Esraa Abdel Fattah, who became widely known as “Facebook girl,” as well Libya’s Danya Bashir, Bahrain’s Zeinab and Maryam al-Khawaja and Tunisia’s Lina Ben Mhenni, who became known as the uprising’s “Twit
URL: 
http://bakerinstitute.org/publications/ITP-pub-CyberactivismAndWomen-051712.pdf

Marriage Structure and Resistance to the Gender Revolution in the Workplace

 In this article, we examine a heretofore neglected pocket of resistance to the gender revolution in the workplace: married male employees who have stay-at-home wives. We develop and empirically test the theoretical argument suggesting that such organizational members, compared to male employees in modern marriages, are more likely to exhibit attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are harmful to women in the workplace. To assess this hypothesis, we conducted four studies with a total of 718 married, male participants. We found that employed husbands in traditional marriages, compared to those in modern marriages, tend to (a) view the presence of women in the workplace unfavorably, (b) perceive that organizations with higher numbers of female employees are operating less smoothly, (c) find organizations with female leaders as relatively unattractive, and (d) deny, more frequently, qualified female employees opportunities for promotion.

URL: 
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2018259

Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2010

New maternal mortality estimates confirm that the number of women dying in pregnancy and childbirth is declining. Along with other indicators, this joint U.N. report validates the fact that we are making progress in saving mothers’ lives, even if progress is slower than what is called for by the Millennium Development Goals.

Rapid progress in some countries demonstrates that when governments take a strategic approach to the safe motherhood challenge -- by deploying trained midwives, ensuring adequate essential supplies, making family planning accessible and providing timely obstetric care to women with complications, we are getting results. Still, there is more work to be done in delivering a world where every pregnancy is wanted and every childbirth is safe.

 

URL: 
http://www.unfpa.org/public/home/mothers/MMEstimates2012

The Girl Effect: What Do Boys Have to Do With It? Meeting Report

 The unique potential of adolescent girls to contribute to reducing and ending poverty both for themselves and their communities, often referred to as the “Girl Effect,” has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. There is a broad consensus on the desirability of involving boys and men in efforts to change harmful gender norms and create more equitable environments for girls, there is less agreement as to how this is best achieved.

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/girl-effect-what-do-boys-have-do-it-0
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