Diversity & Inclusion

Diversity drives diversity: From the boardroom to the C-suite

EY

Incremental changes in gender diversity continued across boardrooms and C-suites at US companies in 2013.
The data reveals that these incremental changes may be transformative over time: putting women on the board and in leadership roles drives further diversification — across gender, tenure and age — in the boardroom and across the executive pipeline.

 

 

URL: 
http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-Diversity-drives-diversity/$FILE/EY-Diversity-drives-diversity.pdf

Saving San Francisco’ probes relief and recovery after the 1906 disaster

See: Saving San Francisco’ probes relief and recovery after the 1906 disaster

FromThe Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University

Author: Lori Nishiura Mackenzie

Date Published: April 6, 2012

Teaser: 

(STANFORD, Calif.) As a firefighter in San Francisco, Andrea Rees Davies learned to climb 100-foot ladders and to rescue swimmers from treacherous surf. The job threw her into people’s private lives, bringing her face-to-face with the emotional impact of those crises. 

Saving San Francisco’ probes relief and recovery after the 1906 disaster

URL: 
http://www.prlog.org/11843001-saving-san-francisco-probes-relief-and-recovery-after-the-1906-disaster.html
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Preparedness Meets Opportunity: Women's Increased Representation in the New Jersey Legislature

See: Preparedness Meets Opportunity: Women's Increased Representationin the New Jersey Legislature

FromCenter for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University

Author: Susan J. Carroll and Kelly Dittmar

Date Published: July 2012

 

Teaser: 

Several studies on the descriptive representation of women in office have examined questions related to candidate emergence, often trying to explain why so few women run for office (e.g., Bledsoe and Herring 1990; Fox and Lawless 2004; Fulton et al. 2006; Lawless and Fox 2010; Sanbonmatsu, Carroll, and Walsh 2009).

Associated Issues & Expertise:

Preparedness Meets Opportunity: Women's Increased Representation in the New Jersey Legislature

Several studies on the descriptive representation of women in office have examined questions related to candidate emergence, often trying to explain why so few women run for office (e.g., Bledsoe and Herring 1990; Fox and Lawless 2004; Fulton et al. 2006; Lawless and Fox 2010; Sanbonmatsu, Carroll, and Walsh 2009). Another body of research has focused largely on how the political opportunities available to women affect their descriptive representation among elected officials, analyzing, for example, the effects of electoral arrangements, term limits, and quota systems (e.g., Carroll and Jenkins 2001; Dahlerup 2006; Darcy, Welch, and Clark 1994; Krook 2009; Rule and Zimmerman 1994). Far less often have the "supply" side and the "demand" side of women's political representation been investigated together in the same study in order to understand how they interact.

URL: 
http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/research/research_by_cawp_scholars/documents/Carroll_and_Dittmar_WomenIncreasedinNJLeg.pdf

Making Care Count: A Century of Gender, Race, and Paid Care Work

There are fundamental tasks common to every society: children have to be raised, homes need to be cleaned, meals need to be prepared, and people who are elderly, ill, or disabled need care. Day in, day out, these responsibilities can involve both monotonous drudgery and untold rewards for those performing them, whether they are family members, friends, or paid workers. These are jobs that cannot be outsourced, because they involve the most intimate spaces of our everyday lives--our homes, our bodies, and our families.

URL: 
http://books.google.com/books/about/Making_Care_Count.html?id=3qCRU8opmRAC
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Gender and Justice: Why Women in the Judiciary Really Matter

See: Gender and Justice: Why Women in the Judiciary Really Matter 

From: Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University

Author: Sally Kenney

Date Published: July 13, 2012

 

Intended for use in courses on law and society, as well as courses in women’s and gender studies, women and politics, and women and the law, this book explores different questions in different North American and European geographical jurisdictions and courts, demonstrating the value of a gender analysis of courts, judges, law, institutions, organizations, and, ultimately, politics. Gender and Justice argues empirically for both more women and more feminists on the bench, while demonstrating that achieving these two aims are independent projects.

Teaser: 

Intended for use in courses on law and society, as well as courses in women’s and gender studies, women and politics, and women and the law, this book explores different questions in different North American and European geographical jurisdictions and courts, demonstrating the value of a gender analysis of courts, judges, law, institutions, organizations, and, ultimately, politics. 

PROGRESS AND PROMISE: Title IX at 40 Conference

See: PROGRESS AND PROMISE: Title IX at 40 Conference

From: Institute for Research on Women and Gender at University of Michigan

Authors: Don Sabo, James Eckner, Christine Grant, Nicole LaVoi, Caroline Richardson, Marj Snyder, Ellen Staurowsky, and Susan Ware

Date Published: Februrary 2013

Teaser: 

Forty years ago, the work of Oregon representative Edith Green, educator Bernice Sandler, Hawaii representative Patsy Mink and Indiana senator Birch Bayh came to fruition when Congress passed Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. 

Associated Issues & Expertise:

PROGRESS AND PROMISE: Title IX at 40 Conference

URL: 
http://www.rackham.umich.edu/downloads/michigan-meetings-title-ix-at-forty-white-paper.pdf

Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights

See: Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights

FromInstitute for Research on Women at Rutgers University

Author: Dorothy L. Hodgson

Date Published: May 17, 2011

 

An interdisciplinary collection, Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights examines the potential and limitations of the "women's rights as human rights" framework as a strategy for seeking gender justice. Drawing on detailed case studies from the United States, Africa, Latin America, Asia, and elsewhere, contributors to the volume explore the specific social histories, political struggles, cultural assumptions, and gender ideologies that have produced certain rights or reframed long-standing debates in the language of rights.

Teaser: 

An interdisciplinary collection, Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights examines the potential and limitations of the "women's rights as human rights" framework as a strategy for seeking gender justice. Drawing on detailed case studies from the United States, Africa, Latin America, Asia, and elsewhere, contributors to the volume explore the specific social histories, political struggles, cultural assumptions, and gender ideologies that have produced certain rights or reframed long-standing debates in the language of rights. 

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