Diversity & Inclusion

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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Daddy, can a man be Prime Minister?

By Gwendolyn Beetham*

When I was in graduate school in London, one of my professors told a cute story about his daughter, born during the Thatcher era, who as a small child had asked him whether a man could be Prime Minister. The point that my professor was trying to make was that having more women in positions of power does make a difference in how women’s roles are perceived by society at large.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action

By Karen O’Connor*

One need only look to the Declaration of Sentiments adopted by the women in attendance at the Seneca Falls Convention in August 1848 to begin to appreciate how far women in the United States still are from reaching equality in a host of arenas, many of which are dependent on political or legal equality. Although women were granted the franchise in 1920 after decades of struggle, it is only in the past few decades that women have become a political force – at least at the ballot box. Women not only vote more than men, but unmarried women and women of color are much more likely to vote for Democratic candidates. In fact, women were key voters in the successful elections of Presidents Clinton and Obama.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Achieving Political Equality by Living It

By Tonni Brodber*

Linda Basch: From your perspective, what is the unfinished work of women’s political equality?

Tonni Brodber: In the English-speaking Caribbean women’s participation in political leadership ranges from a high of 13% in Jamaica to a low of 0% in Belize, with many countries like St. Kitts and Nevis and St Lucia hovering at 6.7% and at 5.6% respectively. In the face of such paltry numbers, it almost pains me to say that it is my belief that the unfuinished work of women’s political equality is the lack of quality and diversity.


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Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

The Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) at the University of Maryland is an interdisciplinary research center which promotes intersectional scholarship through original research, mentoring, and collaboration. CRGE's work explores the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality as they shape the construction and representation of identities, behavior and complex social relations.

Contact

1208 Cole Field House
College Park, MD 20742
Ph. (301) 405-2931
Fx. (301) 405-2868
http://www.crge.umd.edu
btdill@umd.edu
rzambran@umd.edu

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Principal Staff

Ruth E. Zambrana, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: rzambran@umd.edu

Laura A. Logie, Ph.D., Assistant Director
E-mail: lauraalogie@hotmail.com

Bonnie Thornton Dill, Ph.D., Founding Director, CRGE
E-mail: btdill@umd.edu

Wendy Hall, Program Management Specialist
E-mail: hallw@umd.edu

Beth Douthirt-Cohen, Communications Coordinator
E-mail: bdc1@umd.edu
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Developing Research Studies include:

 
Limited research has been conducted on CVD risk factors and effective interventions among Latinos of Central and South American origin (CSA). Specific aims of this study are to: (1) assess health behaviors, social and psychosocial CVD risk factors among adult Central/South American men and women; (2) examine the associations between psychosocial, social and health behavior cardiovascular risk factors with clinical measurements among adult CSA men and women; and (3) conduct a pilot study with lay health promoters to test the effectiveness of literacy and linguistic appropriate health education using the Model for Improvement to improve CVD risk profiles among CSA adults. A cross-sectional health interview and examination survey of 400 CSA 30-64 year old adults residing in Montgomery County MD will be conducted, followed by an intervention with 30 lay community health promoters. The intervention includes 14 contact points; pre- and post-test instruments will measure effectiveness of the intervention.

Does Stress “Get Under the Skin” Differently By Social Status? Identifying Essential Bio-Social Pathways for Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity
 
 
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the major cause of death in the United States and racial/ethnic minorities have high incidence and prevalence rates compared to other groups in the population. According to the American Heart Association (2009), most recent prevalence rates for CVD were highest for blacks (45%) compared to Whites (33%) and Hispanics make up the largest ethnic group with increasing rates (32%) relative to their representation in the population. Although studies have documented population differences in CVD, the underlying biological and social risk factors that work concomitantly to account for these differences are not well researched or understood. Using secondary data from the 2006 health and Retirement Study Core Data File and Biomarker Supplement, we will examine the association between social status, SES, psycho-social adversities, biomarkers of disease, health status and health behaviors to assess their relationship(s) to CVD morbidity. Our main analytic interest in examining these relationships is to identify essential bio-social pathways of disease vulnerability, the mechanisms that mediate or moderate those relationships and the risk factors that place marginalized minorities (Blacks and Hispanics) at a disadvantage for CVD morbidity at older (50+yrs) rather than younger ages (<25yrs). This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine how social risk factors “get under the skin” differently for status groups in efforts to identify the important distal mechanisms involved that disproportionately increase VCD risk f or Blacks and Hispanics. Implications and outcomes of the study are aimed to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Stress for Success: The Impact of Occupational Stressors on the African American & Latino Professoriate
 
Occupational stress manifests itself in stress-related disorders (physical, mental), poor work performance, reduced productivity and retention of qualified employees in the workforce. This project investigates the relationships between occupational stressors, organizational factors, and moderators to explain variation in the physical and mental health of under-represented minority (URM) men and women faculty. Mixed methods are proposed to test the central hypothesis- URM women faculty will report a higher reported number of physical and mental health conditions than URM men. Data is collected from four sources; 1) survey, 2) focus groups, 3) in-depth interviews, and, 4) review of Curriculum Vitae. The sample will consist of 300 (150 males & 150 females) URM tenure track assistant or tenured associate professors in Research I and II institutions. These data will serve as the baseline for a larger longitudinal study to assess career path and progression over a three year follow-up time period.

Childhood Origins of Health Disparities in Young Adulthood
 
 
The primary objective in the proposed application is to determine the independent and interacting influences of gender, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES) at the family and community level on overweight and health among adolescents and young adults. Our central hypothesis is that social/cultural factors (e.g. preferences and norms) and structural factors (e.g. differential access to resources) interact to explain the disparities in weight status observed across racial/ethnic groups. Our collective experience in research on Hispanic, African American, Asian, and majority health, childhood obesity, the analysis of health outcomes, and our experience with management and analysis of large datasets make us uniquely qualified to conduct this research project.

Differences in Risk Factors by Hypertension Status Among Postmenopausal African American and Latino Women
 
The goal of this study is to investigate how various risk factors, socioeconomic status (SES), psychosocial, and access related factors, mediated by health behaviors and medical history, can increase our understanding of race/ethnic and gender differences in hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive; treated vs. untreated; controlled vs. uncontrolled) and transitions in hypertension status for African American and Latino women ages 50 to79 years. Using secondary data analyses of the Women's' Health Initiative (WHI) for the African American (n=14,618) and Latino (n=6484) subsamples of the Observational Study (OS), Clinical Trials and Extended Study (2005-2010), we will address the risk factors that place racial/ethnic women at risk for critical levels of hypertension. Our main analytic interest in comparing hypertension status at baseline and transitions of hypertension status in subsequent years is to capture how risk factors can accumulate and exacerbate health conditions over time. Specifically, this study 1) examines the association between SES, psychosocial, and access factors with hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive) and transitions in status and tests whether the associations are mediated by medical history and health behaviors among African American and Latino women, 2) assesses the underlying factors contributing to differences in two indicators of hypertension status a) treated vs. untreated hypertensives and b) controlled vs. uncontrolled hypertension status and transitions in status among African American and Latino women that have been identified as having hypertension, and 3) examines the relationship between access to care and geographic availability for health care services and hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive and treated vs. untreated) and transitions in status for African American and Latino women. Of significance, assessing hypertension endpoints over time periods will allow a longitudinal assessment of the effects of SES on hypertension status. More importantly, the patterns of outcomes of the study will illuminate our understanding of the underlying factors that contribute to disparities in hypertension status for racial/ethnic women. This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine incidence and prevalence of hypertension status by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status using longitudinal data in efforts to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Past Research Program Areas:

Intersections, Identities, and Inequalities (Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, director)

This program area focuses on the development of theoretical, methodological and pedagogical approaches to the study of intersections of race, gender, class, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality. It is an interdisciplinary research program area that seeks to elaborate how dimensions of inequality intersect, creating new and distinct social formations. This includes promoting research that contextualizes the lives and experiences of individuals and groups, as well as develops applications of knowledge to human problems. This scholarship embraces a wide range of approaches that permit complex and nuanced explorations. Intersectional analysis is also an effort to move beyond binary or oppositional analyses and toward an understanding of the ways the ideological, political, and economic systems of power construct and reconstruct one another. An intersectional approach, grounded in lived experience, provides the intellectual foundation for the pursuit of social justice.

Health and Social Well Being of Low Income Women, Children, and Families (Dr. Ruth E. Zambrana, director)

This program area seeks to build a more comprehensive and ethnic-specific scientific knowledge base on the effects of the intersection of poverty, institutional barriers, and other non-medical factors that contribute to adverse health status. This approach takes into account the influence of race, gender, and ethnicity to promote responsiveness in the development of future health interventions.

Material Culture/Visual Culture (Drs. Mary Corbin Sies and Angel David Nieves, co-directors)

The Material Culture/Visual Culture (MC/VC) program area is engaged in research on African American material and visual culture, and more generally on the material and visual culture of marginalized subgroups of North America. The group seeks to publicize the value of material and visual evidence for understanding the cultures of everyday life of American subcultures and to foster an environment in which scholars from different backgrounds can explore and refine research and theories for working with material and visual culture.

Schooling, Ethnic Communities and International Perspectives. (Dr. Lory J. Dance, director).

This Research Program Area is in the early stages of development. Led by sociologist Dr. Lory J. Dance, this area focuses on the uses of qualitative methodologies in the study of education in ethnic communities in the United States and internationally. The group also houses the Qualitative Research Interest Group (QRIG; co-directed by Drs. Lory J. Dance and Annette Lareau), which sponsored a colloquium series in fall 2005 on funding qualitative research projects.

Other Activities:

Intersectional Research Database. CRGE is home to the world's first online database devoted exclusively to intersectional research. The Intersectional Research Database (IRD), which was launched in summer 2005, currently features over 100 annotations of articles and books on intersectional issues. The IRD is updated weekly and will soon include audio, visual images, video and sound.

CRGE Graduate Colloquium. CRGE holds a monthly colloquium for graduate students that focuses on various topics related to intersectionality and social justice. Graduate students from across the disciplines participate through attendance and by sharing their own work at the end of each semester. Recent colloquium topics have dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; interdisciplinary job talks; intersections and sexualities; and the commodification of Black youth, which was led by Dr. Patricia Hill Collins.

Research Interest Groups (RIGS). RIGS are smaller research groups, each sponsored by a Research Program Area. RIGS are collaborative, interdisciplinary groups that conduct intersectional research. The RIGS aim to create groups that can assist their members in preparing and submitting proposals for federal, state, and private sector research grants in CRGE Research Program Areas.


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Reports & Resources

 Click here for all publications.


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CRISP Scholars

CRGE Interdisciplinary Scholars Program (CRISP) provides scholars with an opportunity to learn firsthand the processes of research, publication, and administration through a mentoring relationship with CRGE faculty. The focus of this exceptional program is two-fold: rigorous training and dedicated mentoring. CrISP scholars are first- and second-year incoming graduate students from departments affiliated with CRGE.


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Women's Research & Resource Center

The Spelman College Women’s Research & Resource Center embraces our unique identity and claims our pioneering role among historically Black and women’s colleges firmly rooted in the liberal arts tradition. We are committed to creating a global community of progressive women and men who envision a world free from injustice, exploitation, violence, poverty, waste, greed, illness, and misogyny. We are especially opposed to practices and images that debase African American and other women of color. 

Through curricular innovation, scholarship, activism and collaborations, the Women’s Center is educating future generation of free-thinking, unapologetic Black women who will document our stories, advocate for our rights, and join with others in the ongoing struggle to transform our communities and rescue the planet!

Principal Staff

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: bsheftal@spelman.edu

M. Bahati Kuumba, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: kuumba@spelman.edu

Ayoka Chenzira, Director of Digital Moving Salon
E-mail: chenzira@spelman.edu

Lillie Picard, Administrative Assistant
Ph. (404) 270-5625
E-mail: lpicard@spelman.edu

Dana Pride Jones, Program Coordinator
Ph. (404) 270-5627
E-mail: dpjones@spelman.edu
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Another premier component of the program is the Digital Moving Image Salon, which teaches students how to make films. Launched in 2004 by Dr. Ayoka Chenzira, an award-winning, internationally acclaimed film and video digital media artist, and the College’s first Cosby Chair, DMIS serves as a learning space, training ground, and production studio for students interested in documentary film making and digital media productions.
 
Juliana Montgomery graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in film studies from Spelman in 2006. She has the distinction of being Spelman's first graduate in the independent major she created, and was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Among the works that she associate produced was the 2009 Emmy Award-winning Coca-Cola advertisement, “Heist.”
“Spelman’s comparative women’s studies department not only supported my independent major and course of study, it made possible an environment through which my understanding of images of women – especially of women of color – within the visual media, could be realized,” said Montgomery.

Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference

Named for feminist author, scholar, activist and filmmaker Toni Cade Bambara, the conference acknowledges her legacy of scholarship and social activism.

“Year after year we’ve been able to motivate students to engage in creative ways to celebrate the life and legacy of one of our most important sheroes,” said Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D., founding director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center. “No one else remembers Toni Cade Bambara annually in the ways we do, and for that, I am sure the people she impacted for so many years, including me, are very grateful.”
 
The two-day conference is developed and facilitated by Spelman students who are led by Bahati Kuumba, Ph.D., associate professor of women's studies, and associate director of the Women's Research and Resource Center. It features paper presentations, workshops and performance pieces that delve into dimensions of Black/African women’s lives, scholarship and social change activism.

"The conference brings awareness to issues related to women of African descent and women of color who have been actively engaged in using their knowledge and organizational skills to forward social justice," said Kuumba.

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Women's Resource Center

The Women's Resource Center is an integral part of Washington State University's commitment to equity and diversity. The Center works to promote a safe and supportive climate that enables women to engage as full and active participants within the university community. The Women's Resource Center helps transform the educational environment into a more inclusive and progressive institution by assisting, supporting, and mentoring women at Washington State University.

The Women's Resource Center develops programs to celebrate women's diversity and contributions, while actively confronting societal challenges and obstacles through activism and working for change. Our programs address gender, race, class, and their intersections, recognizing the relevance of these inter-related social issues. Offering resources and educational programs to members of our university, we engage the larger constituencies to act as change agents for a more diverse and inclusive educational system.

Contact


Pullman, WA 99164-4005
Ph. (509) 335-6849
Fx. (509) 335-4377
http://www.women.wsu.edu/
kim_barrett@wsu.edu


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Principal Staff

Turea Erwin, Director & NEW Leadership Inland Northwest Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-8200
E-mail: turea_erwin@wsu.edu

Kim Barrett, Program Support Specialist
Ph. (509) 335-4386
E-mail: kim_barrett@wsu.edu

Stephanie Russell, YWCA of WSU Program Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-2572
E-mail: stephanie.russell@email.wsu.edu

Joseph Pacific, Program Coordinator-Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services
Ph. (509) 335-1856
E-mail: jpacific@wsu.edu
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A core pillar of the Women's Resource Center, Women's Transit strives to extend the values of inspiration, encouragement, and empowerment to all students at Washignton State University. The primary goal of this program is to act as a resource to reduce the incidents of sexual assault in the community. Students who feel safe getting to and from classes, work, and social events are far more likely to succeed than students who are scared to simply live their lives while at school. We also believe that giving back to the community is incredibly important to a well-rounded education. We give nearly all students who apply the opportunity to learn valuable skills in communication, crisis management, and sexual assault risk reduction.
 
 
The Coalition for Women Students (CWS) was formed in 1912 as the Association for Women Students (AWS) by the Washington State College women students. The term “coalition” was adopted in the fall of 1993 to express a common vision for the student groups involved. A coalition is comprised of distinct groups or persons in alliance for joint action. In this case the joint action is heightening awareness of issues pertaining to women locally and globally.
 
 
APAW is committed to coordinating student programs that heighten awareness of Pacific and Asian women’s issues. APAW’s programs empower community and individual pride, celebrate our rich cultures, and highlight our diverse contributions. The Association of Pacific and Asian Women fosters leadership development opportunities for women by bringing ideas and vision into action on an individual and group level. Women’s leadership roles are supported and fostered within our organization.
 
 
The Black Women's Caucus (BWC) serves as a support system for African American Women on the WSU campus. Its main focus is to serve as an instrument through which African American women are able to express their concerns about issues they face globally as well as locally. BWC is also concerned with educating other students about the pioneering roles and major contributions of African American women in this society. Membership is open to all students who share the concerns of Black Women's Caucus.
 
 
Mujeres Unidas represents the interests and issues of Chicanas/Latinas at WSU and coordinates activities and opportunities of interest to multicultural women students. Members contribute to community projects and provide peer support for Chicanas and Latinas. In addition, MU provides women with the opportunity to gain leadership training and experience.
 
 
The purpose of the Native American Women's Association (NAWA) is to address the needs and concerns of Native American people, with a special emphasis on issues that affect Native American women. NAWA encourages women of color to assume leadership roles on campus and become actively involved in the community.
 
 
The YWCA of WSU is a member association of the YWCA of the USA. We have been part of the WSU community since 1895 and are proud to be part of this women's membership movement.

 


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Whether you are looking to give two hours or fourty hours of your time this semester, Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services wants to bring you on as part of the team. No prior experience in ANYTHING is necessary. We will train everyone is driving, dispatching, and walking. You don't even need a driver license (we obviously won't place you as a driver, but there are many other things that you can do)!

 


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