Diversity & Inclusion

New York University

Founded in 2000, as a part of the Roundtable of Institutions of People of Color, the Women of Color Policy Network, an Affiliate of the Research Center for Leadership in Action at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, NYU is the country's only research and policy group focusing on women of color housed at a nationally ranked top 10 public policy program. The Network conducts original research and collects critical data on women of color that is used to inform public policy outcomes at the local, state, and national levels. The Network also serves as a hub for women of color scholars, leaders, and practitioners.

Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

  • Beyond The Window Summer Youth Public Policy Institute
  • Strategic Conversations in Public Service

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Reports & Resources

  • In the Shadow of the UN: The Global North and South in NYC
  • Making Ends Meet: Women and Poverty in New York City
  • Race, Gender, and the Recession
  • Women Of Color In New York City:Still Invisible In Policy
  • Women of Color in New York City: The Challenges of the New Global Economy
  • Women of Color in New York City and the Millennium Development Goals: The Case for Localization
  • Understanding Client and Occupation Barriers in New York City
  • Race Realities in New York City
  • We Speak: New York City Women Living with HIV/AIDS
  • Third Annual Status of Women of Color Report: Young Women of Color in New York City
  • Gender, Race, Class and Welfare Reform

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Center News

Diversifying the Leadership: An Opportunity for Change

May 29, 2009 posted by admin


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Media and Popular Culture: A Catch-22

May 21, 2009 posted by admin

Mass media is the heart of many current debates; however, the nature of the media remains double-edged. On a positive side, blogging and other forms of on-line communication have become key aspects of today’s feminist outreach. On line gender related activism and strive for change challenge and supplement the mainstream media. For example, check out this post from Racialicious (fyi, the editor of this fantastic blog is one of our panelists):


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Front and Center: Women in Science, Environment and Technology

May 18, 2009 posted by admin


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Getting Women into the Political Arena

May 15, 2009 posted by admin

This past year has been a whirlwind for women and politics!  The campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin demonstrated that sexism in the media is far from dead. A number of powerful women are playing vital roles in the new administration.  And Obama’s first 100 days proved to be very woman-friendly. Of course, our work is far from done. 


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LGBT Activism: Past, Present, Future

May 13, 2009 posted by admin

With the legalization of same-sex marriage spreading like wildfire in the Northeast  and exciting progress on hate crime protections (legislation passed the House AND Angie Zapata got justice),  what better time to discuss the past, present, and future of LGBT activism? 


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New Strategies for Leadership

May 11, 2009 posted by admin

One of the many dynamic panels to be featured at our upcoming annual conference , Igniting Change: Activating Alliances for Social Justice, will feature top scholars and activists taking apart the challenges of building pipelines of leadership for young girls and boys.  At the end of the session, we hope to offer new strategies for collaborating with youth as we discover new definitions of leadership and feminism. 


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ADVOCACY CORNER: White House Council on Women and Girls

March 11, 2009 posted by admin Take the Women in Politics History QuizThis just in: by executive order President Obama has created a White House Council on Women and Girls.  As NOW stated in their press release, "We asked for a Cabinet-level office to work on women's issues, and we got the entire cabinet." The Council will headed by Valerie Jarrett and include every Cabinet secretary and head of every Cabinet-level agency.  This is obviously a huge step.  What do you think the first


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Women Leaders Across Sectors on Social Justice and Change

March 3, 2009 posted by Deborah Siegel I’m sitting in a very crowded auditorium at 3 World Financial Center, home of American Express, and the sun is pouring in on one of the coldest days of the year. We’re about to be warmed by the annual panel that takes place the afternoon of the National Council for Research on Women’s evening-time gala, the Making a Difference for Women Awards. This year’s panel, “An Immodest Proposal: Advancing a New Era of Social Justice” (kudos on the title, NCRW!) features Co-President of the National Women’s Law Center Marcia Greenberger, Chancellor and President of Syracuse University Nancy Cantor, Accenture / Microsoft / PepsiCo Director Dina Dublon, and Columbia University law professor and Nation columnist Patricia Williams. The Takeaway co-host Adaora Udoji, whose voice I wake up to each morning, will be moderating. There is nothing modest about this crowd of female movers and shakers from corporate, academic, and nonprofit spheres. The NCRW staff—of which I used to be part—has clearly done an excellent job spreading word. It’s a dazzling lineup. Let the conversation begin! Adaora: First question is for Nancy. What can you tell us about advancing a new era of social justice in education? Nancy: The idea of the ivory tower as a monastic place is breaking down. What that means is we have no understanding of the groups we’re leaving behind. How do we level the playing field of education? If we don’t find ways to strengthen our connections to our communities, cities, rural areas, and bring in the population, we’re going to be stagnant. Adaora: Are we seeing that 50% female leadership in education yet? Nancy: No, not at all. What we are seeing at all levels is girls falling off the map as we go up. Adaora: Why is that?


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FAST FACT: LGBT Students of Color Face Alarming Rates of Harassment and Violence in School

February 28, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network reported the experiences of 2,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) middle and high school students of color who were African American or Black, Latino/a, Asian or Pacific Islander, Native American, and multiracial as part of their National School Climate Survey.  The report found that


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