Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

The Economic Security and Well-being Index for Women in New York City™

New York City is home to more than four million women and girls representing a wide range of racial and ethnic backgrounds, citizenship statuses, educational attainment levels, and occupations. Of those, close to one in four are economically vulnerable, meaning they are likely to live in poverty, have lower earnings and suffer longer spells of unemployment than other women in the City. 

Teaser: 

The Economic Security and Well-being Index for Women in New York City™ provides an in-depth analysis of the economic security, health and safety, and well-being of women in the 59 community districts. It analyzes issues that shape the lives of women and girls, including poverty, income and employment; violence and safety; and education and health.

Economic Security and Well-Being Index for Women in New York City

New York City is home to more than four million women and girls representing a wide range of racial and ethnic backgrounds, citizenship statuses, educational attainment levels, and occupations. Of those, close to one in four are economically vulnerable, meaning they are likely to live in poverty, have lower earnings and suffer longer spells of unemployment than other women in the City. 

URL: 
http://www.nywf.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/New-York-Womens-Foundation-Report.pdf
Member Organization: 

The Food Assistance Program: A Critical Safety Net for America’s Poor

A recent New York Times editorial states that under the Obama administration the homeless population has remained steady. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 which provided $840 billion as stimulus monies included a $1.5 billion program that providing housing, rental assistance and temporary aid to people who had suddenly become homeless. But the editorial also notes, while conditions might be improving for homeless individuals, things are bleak for families with children. The National Women’s Law Center reported findings that in 2010, over 40 percent of single-mother families were poor; African-American and Hispanic single-mothers families living in poverty were 48 percent and 50 percent respectively.


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Publication Party: The Global and the Intimate

Celebrate the publication of The Global and the Intimate: Feminism in Our Time, edited by Geraldine Pratt and Victoria Rosner (BWAF Trustee).

Please join the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, the English Department, and the School of General Studies at Columbia University for a celebration in honor of the publication of: The Global and the Intimate: Feminism in Our Time, edited by Geraldine Pratt and Victoria Rosner (BWAF Trustee & Associate Dean at Columbia University)

Tuesday, October 9, 2012, 6:30-9:30pm, 754 Schermerhorn Extension, Columbia University, NYC

Special Guest Speakers will include Victoria Rosner, Geraldine Pratt, Rachel Adams, Mikhal Dekel and Nancy K. Miller

 

Retirement Security: Older Women Remain at Risk

GAO-12-825T, Jul 25, 2012

 

What GAO Found

Over the last decade, working women’s access to and participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans have improved relative to men. In fact, from 1998 to 2009, women surpassed men in their likelihood of working for an employer that offered a pension plan—largely because the proportion of men covered by a plan declined. Furthermore, as employers have continued to terminate their defined benefit plans and switch to defined contribution plans, the proportion of women who worked for employers that offered a defined contribution plan increased. Women’s higher rates of pension coverage may be due to the fact that they are more likely to work in the public and nonprofit sectors and industries that offer coverage, such as health and education.

URL: 
http://gao.gov/products/GAO-12-825T

The Pregnancy Assistance Fund as a Support for Student Parents in Postsecondary Education

The Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) is a competitive grant program created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that provides funding to states and tribes to support programs that provide pregnant and parenting women and girls with supportive services to help them complete high school or postsecondary degrees (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 2010a). Only two states, Minnesota and Virginia, have used their PAF grants to provide services related to postsecondary institutions. This fact sheet describes several of the programs and initiatives created by these PAF grantees. Unless otherwise noted, all program information comes from interviews with program officials and staff.

by Rhiana Gunn-Wright (July 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/the-pregnancy-assistance-fund-as-a-support-for-student-parents-in-postsecondary-education

Intended and Unintended Births in the United States: 1982–2010

Report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Objectives—This report shows trends since 1982 in whether a woman wanted to get pregnant just before the pregnancy occurred. This is the most direct measure available of the extent to which women are able (or unable) to choose to have the number of births they want, when they want them. In this report, this is called the ‘‘standard measure of unintended pregnancy.’’

Methods—The data used in this report are primarily from the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. The 2006–2010 NSFG included in-person interviews with 12,279 women aged 15–44. Some data in the trend analyses are taken from NSFG surveys conducted in
1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002.

URL: 
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr055.pdf
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