Economic Security

Recession, Stimulus and the Child Care Sector: Understanding Economic Dynamics, Calculating Impact

 As part of the new Stimulus Bill (ARRA), states and localities may be required to show economic impact of the stimulus funds. This brief has been developed to help state policymakers calculate the stimulus effects of increased child care spending on output and employment in the state economy.

There are three important aspects of the child care sector which need to be counted when assessing economic impact: 1) direct employment and output in the child care sector itself, 2) multiplier effects of the sector in the broader regional economy, and 3) the social infrastructure role child care plays in supporting the parent workforce. All of these are short term economic effects. This report will address each of these aspects in turn and show how to calculate these effects using an example with data from the State of Kansas. But first we must understand the structure of the child care sector.

Teaser: 

This brief has been developed to help state policymakers calculate the stimulus effects of increased child care spending on output and employment in the state economy. There are three important aspects of the child care sector which need to be counted when assessing economic impact: 1) direct employment and output in the child care sector itself, 2) multiplier effects of the sector in the broader regional economy, and 3) the social infrastructure role child care plays in supporting the parent workforce. All of these are short term economic effects.

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State Implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Appendix C: Safety Net

The ARRA provides significant funding increases for a number of human services, health, employment and other safety net programs. This additional support is intended to provide relief for lower-income families and others hardest hit by the recession. In addition, the funding will assit fiscally constrained state and local governments as they manage administrative and operational challenges stemming from the rise in demand for programs and services.

To read the full report, click here.

Teaser: 

Economists agree that increased assistance to low-income families has the most immediate stimulative effect on the economy because those with the least amount of financial security traditionally engage in more immediate consumption and are less likely to divert those resources into savings or debt reduction. Safety net programs also provide education and training for America’s workforce, ensuring that there is a supply of qualified workers as new jobs become available.

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How the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Addresses Women's Needs

The worsening recession is causing pain across the country, especially for the millions of women and families who already were struggling to make ends meet. The Obama Administration and House and Senate leaders have developed a strong plan for economic recovery to preserve and create jobs, help people through tough times, protect vital public services, and invest in our nation's future. The Conference Agreement on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act includes a number of measures that are especially important for women and their families.

To read the full report, click here.

Teaser: 

The worsening recession is causing pain across the country, especially for the millions of women and families who already were struggling to make ends meet. The Obama Administration and House and Senate leaders have developed a strong plan for economic recovery to preserve and create jobs, help people through tough times, protect vital public services, and invest in our nation's future. The Conference Agreement on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act includes a number of measures that are especially important for women and their families.

 

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Making Unemployment Insurance Work for Women: The Unfinished Agenda

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided incentives to states to modernize their unemployment insurance (UI) programs and improve coverage for women. Many states responded -- but many have yet to act, despite urgent need.

To read full report, click here.  

 

Teaser: 

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided incentives to states to modernize their unemployment insurance (UI) programs and improve coverage for women. Many states responded -- but many have yet to act, despite urgent need.

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Supporting State Child Care Efforts with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funds

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is providing a $2 billion increase for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) for 2009 and 2010, including $255 million for improving the quality of child care, of which $93.6 million is targeted for activities to improve the quality of care for infants and toddlers. States are using their ARRA child care funds to maintain or expand access to child care assistance for families and to support initiatives to enhance the quality of care.

To read full report, click here.

Teaser: 

From the National Women's Law Center, this report tracks how states are using their ARRA child care funds to maintain or expand access to child care assistance for families and to support initiatives to enhance the quality of care.

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Race-Recovery Index: Is Stimulus Helping Communities in Crisis?

The Race-Recovery Index, a project of the Kirwan Institute, is designed to measure how all people, but particularly marginalized populations, are fairing in the midst of the national recovery efforts. The two primary tolls for measurement used on a monthly basis are the naitonal unemployment figures by race, and the Federal contract procurement of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Additional forms of measurement may eventually be added. To read the full report, click here.

Teaser: 

The Race-Recovery Index, a project of the Kirwan Institute, is designed to measure how all people, but particularly marginalized populations, are fairing in the midst of the national recovery efforts.
 

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NCRW Background Paper: Project on the Economic Recovery Act

In the midst of the current economic crisis—which is exacerbating previously existing disparities and inequalities in the United States—the Recovery Act offers an opportune moment to raise up public investment for all Americans and make inroads on gender equality. Building on the Council’s commitment to policies and programs that advance women’s economic well-being, this project aims to gain a better understanding of the impact of the Act on women and their families. Additionally, the project would examine the inequities in the Recovery Act’s allocation of resources and ways to address the resulting disparities.

The Intersection of Race, Gender and Wealth: Why Disparities Matter

On March 8, 2010 NCRW Director of Research and Programs, Shyama Venkatewar, was invited to speak at a special policy discussion in honor of International Women's Day.  Hosted by The Insight Center for Community Economic Development, the Institute for Women's Policy Research, the National Council of Negro Women, the Women of Color Policy Network at NYU, and the National Council for Research on Women, the day focused on Economic Security for Women--how wealth building for women of color is a strategy for long-term economic recovery.  Dr.

Ms. Foundation Hosts Successful Capitol Hill Briefing on the Recession

Last week, the Ms. Foundation for Women--in partnership with the Center for Community Change and Lake Research Partners--hosted a successful Capitol Hill briefing, sharing results from their recent poll on the impact of the recession on women.  According to Gail Cohen from the Joint Economic Committee,

only in May did women gain almost the same number of jobs as men -- but only in temporary Census jobs. In the private sector in May, women lost 1000 jobs while men gained 42,000 jobs.

To learn more about the briefing and download results of the poll, visit the Ms. Foundation's blog, Igniting Change.

 

 


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Yes, Virginia, the Recession Really Has Hurt Women

Hands down, this post from California NOW recieves the award for best title of a blog addressing the gloomy issue of the economic recession.  The post discusses a briefing hosted by the California Budget Project, which challenged this whole idea of a "mancession."  California NOW pulled out these (un)savory data points from the briefing:

  • The number of families supported solely by working mothers rose from 4.7% in 2006 to 8.5% in 2009.
  • California’s typical working woman earned 89.1 cents for every dollar earned by the typical working man in 2009.
     

 


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