Education & Education Reform

Women and girls have made substantial progress in educational attainment. Today in the US women receive more than half of all college degrees – and have almost achieved parity with men in advanced degrees in law, medicine and other disciplines. But several gaps persist, and more importantly, disparities remain among diverse women according to race, income, immigrant status and other socio-economic factors. Improving access to quality education for all students including adolescent girls and mothers needs to become a national and global priority. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

New York Law School Law Review Law Review Diversity Report

In 2011, the New York Law School Law Review launched its Law Review Diversity research project examining gender and minority diversity among law review membership and leadership at ABA law schools nationwide. This research builds upon the 2010 survey conducted by Ms. JD, an organization dedicated to the success of women in law school and the legal profession.

URL: 
http://www.nylslawreview.com/diversity-report/

The Global Gender Gap Report 2011

The Global Gender Gap Index, introduced by the World Economic Forum in 2006, is a framework for capturing the magnitude and scope of gender-based disparities and tracking their progress. The Index benchmarks national gender gaps on economic, political, education- and health-based criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups, and over time. The rankings are designed to create greater awareness among a global audience of
the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them. The methodology and quantitative analysis behind the rankings are intended to serve as a basis for designing effective measures for reducing gender gaps.

URL: 
http://reports.weforum.org/global-gender-gap-2011/

Because I am a Girl: The State of the World’s Girls 2011 - So, what about boys?

'Because I am a Girl: The State of the World’s Girls 2011 - So, what about boys?’ is the fifth in a series of annual reports published by Plan examining the rights of girls throughout their childhood, adolescence and as young women.

 
The report shows that far from being an issue just for women and girls, gender is also about boys and men, and that this needs to be better understood if we are going to have a positive impact on societies and economies.
 
Drawing on research and case studies, the report argues that working for equality must involve men and boys both as holders of power and as a group that is also suffering the consequences of negative gender stereotypes.
 
It also makes recommendations for action, showing policy makers and planners what can make a real difference to girls’ lives all over the world.
URL: 
http://plan-international.org/about-plan/resources/publications/campaigns/because-i-am-a-girl-so-what-about-boys

The Obama Administration

As President Obama and his team lead the nation, AAUW continues to be at the forefront of changes taking place in Washington, D.C. and beyond. On this page, you can read documents AAUW has submitted to the administration, learn more about the members of the president's cabinet, and find additional helpful resources.

From the presidential transition period to present-day, AAUW has been constantly looking for ways to move our priority issues forward. In fact, AAUW has been working closely with the president's team to ensure that breaking through educational and economic barriers for women is on top of the executive branch's agenda. Below are the latest documents AAUW has crafted in response to administration policies, as well as the initial documents AAUW submitted to the presidential transition team, which highlight our federal policy priorities and goals that we have been pursuing since President Obama took office.

 

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/act/issue_advocacy/obamaAdministration.cfm

Would Women Leaders Have Prevented the Global Financial Crisis? Implications for Teaching about Gender and Economics

Would having more women in leadership have prevented the financial crisis? This question challenges feminist economists to once again address questions of "difference" versus "sameness" that have engaged—and often divided—academic feminists for decades. The first part of this essay argues that while some behavioral research seems to support an exaggerated"difference" view, non-simplistic behavioral research can serve feminist libratory purposes by debunking this view and revealing the immense unconscious power of stereotyping, as well as the possibility of non-dualist understandings of gender. The second part of this essay argues that the more urgently needed gender analysis of the financial industry is not concerned with (presumed) "differences" by sex, but rather with the role of gender biases in the social construction of markets.

URL: 
http://www.ase.tufts.edu/gdae/Pubs/wp/11-03NelsonWomenLeaders.pdf

A Report on the Status of Women Faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering at MIT, 2011

At MIT, we like data, especially data that advance our understanding of an important problem. In the 1990s, a group of MIT’s women faculty perceived patterns of inequitable resource allocation between them and their male colleagues.  They collected data that demonstrated and quantified the problem, and they alerted the Institute’s leadership, in a search for practical remedies.  Compelled by the evidence, MIT responded.  Today, a new Report on the Status of Women Faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering at MIT delivers the encouraging news that the process launched by these faculty women has made a lasting, positive difference for women faculty at MIT.
...
URL: 
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/images/documents/women-report-2011.pdf

State Child Care Assistance Policies 2011: Reduced Support for Families in Challenging Times

The National Women's Law Center's 8th annual review of key child care subsidy policies in all fifty states and the District of Columbia reveals that families were worse off in 37 states than they were in 2010 under one or more child care assistance policies.  Families are not only worse off in 2011 than they were in 2010, but are also worse off than a decade ago. Families in only eleven states were better off under one or more child care policy areas than last year, a sharp contrast to NWLC’s findings in the previous year when families in thirty-four states were better off in 2010 than they were in 2009 and worse off in only fifteen states.
URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/resource/state-child-care-assistance-policies-2011-reduced-support-families-challenging-times
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