Education & Education Reform

Women and girls have made substantial progress in educational attainment. Today in the US women receive more than half of all college degrees – and have almost achieved parity with men in advanced degrees in law, medicine and other disciplines. But several gaps persist, and more importantly, disparities remain among diverse women according to race, income, immigrant status and other socio-economic factors. Improving access to quality education for all students including adolescent girls and mothers needs to become a national and global priority. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Financial concerns of first-year college students have wide impact

More first-year college students have concerns about their ability to finance college than at any time since 1971, according to the CIRP Freshman Survey, UCLA's annual survey of the nation's entering students at four-year colleges and universities. Such concerns are part of an overall picture of the impact of the economic downturn on the experiences of entering college students.

More than half of incoming first-time students in 2009 reported "some" concern about financing college, and more students were turning to loans to pay for college ? 53.3 percent in 2009, up 3.9 percentage points from 2008 and the highest level reported in the last nine years.

Girls Inc. Alumna Describes Impact of Girls Inc.

Damary Bonilla, an alumna of Girls Inc. of New York City, answers the question: what does a world full of Girls Inc. girls and women look like?

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Tell Me PSA - School

The award winning Girls Inc. "Tell Me" PSAs feature girls telling adults what positive messages they need to hear.  

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ING Foundation and Girls Inc. Launch Innovative Investment Challenge for Girls Ages 12-18

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Girls Incorporated

New York, NY — February 12, 2009

NCRW Policy Brief: Education

Despite gains in educational achievement for women and girls over the last decade, the gap continues to widen for low-income women and women of color. Access to education is key to women’s economic security and well-being. More vigorous efforts are needed to ensure sufficient support programs at the state and federal levels for low-income women and women heads of households.
 

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NCRW Fact Sheet: Women and Educational Disparities--A Call to Action

Today, women are more likely than men to attend college after high school, and are as likely to graduate with a postsecondary degree.  However, the gains made by women have not translated into earnings and higher wages in the labor market.

DUAL-CAREER ACADEMIC COUPLES: WHAT UNIVERSITIES NEED TO KNOW

Based on the partnering status of full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty in thirteen top U.S. research universities, Dual-Career Academic Couples explores the impact of dual-career partnering on hiring, retention, professional attitudes, and work culture in the U.S. university sector. It also makes recommendations for improving the way universities work with dual-career candidates and strengthen overall communication with their faculty on hiring and retention issues.

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http://www.stanford.edu/group/gender/ResearchPrograms/DualCareer/researchstudies.html
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Thirty-Three Years of Women in S&E Faculty Positions

The relatively low proportion of women in academic science and engineering (S&E) has been the topic of numerous recent books, reports, and workshops. Data for 2006 show that women continue to constitute a much lower percentage of S&E full professors than their share of S&E doctorates awarded in that year. Even in psychology, a field heavily dominated by women, women were less than half of all full professors, even though they earned well more than half of doctorates in 2006.

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http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/infbrief/nsf08308/

Girls’ Education in the 21st Century: Gender Equality, Empowerment, and Economic Growth

Much has been done to increase gender equality in education over the past 15 years. National governments and the international community have followed through on promises made in various international forums to increase investments in girls’ education. Overall female enrollment at the primary level in low-income countries has accordingly grown from 87 percent in 1990 to 94 percent in 2004, considerably shrinking the gender gap. This progress is the result of recognition of centrality of girls’ education in development and the overall progress made under the Education for All (EFA) agenda.
 

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http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EDUCATION/Resources/278200-1099079877269/547664-1099080014368/DID_Girls_edu.pdf

Equality for Women: Where do We Stand?

The results towards gender equality are mixed at the halfway point of completion of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the new report by the World Bank and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) says. Women’s health and education have improved substantially in most countries, but progress is lagging on improving their economic opportunities, and investments of some US$13 billion a year are needed to achieve the overall goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment.
 

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http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTGENDER/Resources/4pagerEqualityforWomen.pdf
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