Environment, Sustainability & Energy

Gender is a leading factor for understanding the intersections of the environment, sustainability and energy. The poor (disproportionately women) are at a particular disadvantage from environmental degradation and lack of access to clean water and adequate, affordable energy. Women’s primary role in agricultural production, food preparation and water and fuel collection positions them as vital partners in building and implementing sound environmental policies. Investing in women is one of the most effective ways to advance sustainable development and fight global climate change. The diverse roles and needs of women must be recognized and addressed in programs ranging from rural development to green job creation and urban revitalization. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Feminism and Climate Change

By Kyla Bender-Baird

This Saturday I trudged through the snow to attend the 35th Scholar and Feminist Conference put on by the Barnard Center for Research on Women. Quite appropriately, considering the recent weather, we were discussing feminism and climate change. Commenting on the nearly 36 inches of snow dumped on New York City, Janet Jakobsen, director of BCRW, asked in her welcoming remarks, “Is this a once in a century event or a sign of global climate change?”


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ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT FORUM: Child Care and Green Jobs Key to Women’s Lasting Economic Security

By Sara K. Gould*

Linda Basch: How has ARRA impacted our economy from a local, community, or individual/family perspective?

Sara Gould: ARRA has provided a crucial injection of support to states during the worst of our nation’s current economic crisis. Take child care, for example: several states have used the funding to prevent budget cuts; some have reduced waiting lists for subsidized child care; and others have worked to improve the quality of child-care delivery.


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ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT FORUM: Green Recovery for a Few--Why Equity is Necessary to Ensure Green Jobs for Women and POC

By Yvonne Liu*

One year has passed since the Obama administration enacted the $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the largest boon to public spending and the safety net since the New Deal. Last week, President Obama linked economic recovery to investments in clean energy and green job creation in his State of the Union address.


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Does Women’s Proportional Strength Affect their Participation? Governing Local Forests in South Asia

Date/Time: 
03/30/2010

Bina Agarwal, Professor of Economics, Institute of Economic Growth, University of Delhi

Earth Day

Member Organization: 
Date/Time: 
04/22/2010

Earth Day

Women and Public Space

November 11, 2009 posted by Cheryl Huber*

Last month, NCRW staffer Kyla Bender-Baird spoke on a panel hosted by NYU Wagner Women's Caucus along with Cheryl Huber of New Yorkers for Parks and The International Women's Health Coalition's Khushbu Srivastava.  The panel discussed "The Impact of Women in Public Service."  Cheryl's comments on the intersections of gender and urban planning brought up an often over-looked perspective. 


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Women's Environment and Development Organization

As a global women’s advocacy organization, WEDO envisions a just world that promotes and protects human rights, gender equality and the integrity of the environment.
 
Mission
To contribute toward its vision for the world, WEDO’s mission is to ensure that women’s rights; social, economic and environmental justice; and sustainable development principles-as well as the linkages between them-are at the heart of global and national policies, programs and practices.
 
Approach

Contact

355 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10017
Ph. (212) 973-0325
Fx. (212) 973-0335
http://www.wedo.org
eleanor@wedo.org


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Principal Staff

Cate Owren, Executive Director

Dona Weekes, Finance Manager

Eleanor Blomstrom, Program Coordinator
Ph. (212) 973-0325 x206
E-mail: eleanor@wedo.org

Rachel Harris, Advocacy Coordinator
E-mail: rachel@wedo.org

Sandra Freitas, Policy Advisor

Bridget K. Burns, Project and Communications Coordinator

Andrea Quesada, Project Coordinator
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Women's Leadership

WEDO works to ensure women are empowered as decision-makers and leaders, especially in environmental and sustainable development arenas.
 
Across sectors and movements, WEDO has witnessed firsthand the power of women’s organizing and leadership for change – particularly in protecting and promoting a healthy, peaceful planet. Empowering women as leaders – from the personal and local to the highest decision-making levels – to advance gender equality and protect and promote a sustainable planet is a critical part of WEDO’s work.
 
WEDO joins in partnership with women’s organizations, networks, grassroots groups and activists, UN bodies and IGOs, government Ministries, parliamentarians, congresswomen and men, Heads of State and global thought leaders including academics and Nobel Laureates to promote women’s leadership. Across civil society, WEDO champions the vitality, diversity and influence of women’s organizing and movements – irreplaceable momentum toward justice and equality. And because WEDO’s goal is gender equality, WEDO proudly collaborates with men – some steadfast allies already and some seeking support to be able to become gender equality champions – toward the betterment of society as a whole.
 
 
WEDO works to ensure sustainable development policies, plans and practices are gender responsive. Sustainable development – commonly understood as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own need – is ecologically sound, economically viable, and socially just, and gender equality is prerequisite to it. Interdependent crises of food, fuel and climate – exacerbated by inequitable and fragile economies and social norms – need holistic attention and solutions. To that end, WEDO works to strengthen alliances between the women’s, environmental and development movements, across sectors, and across North and South.
 
Central to its overall vision, sustainable development has long been a cornerstone of WEDO’s mandate. Having been founded specifically to influence the 1992 Earth Summit (UNCED), WEDO has remained focused on strategic advocacy at critical global sustainable development fora, including at the Rio Conventions, the Commission on Sustainable Development, and Rio+20 and its follow-up, as well as national-level processes in several partner countries.
 
One of the most urgent issues on the global agenda, climate change remains a top priority for WEDO’s advocacy, capacity building, information sharing and other efforts to link gender equality and sustainable development.
 
 
WEDO works to ensure global governance is transparent, accountable and effective.
 
Since its founding, WEDO has believed in the potential of, and indeed the necessity for, good global governance. The United Nations has played – and still must play – a strong role in facilitating governments’ agreements and holding them accountable to their commitments. As a result of decades of multi-level, multi-stakeholder action, global legal frameworks for the promotion of human rights, gender equality and environmental sustainability exist. These frameworks provide tools for officials, practitioners and activists to draft and implement sustainable national-level policies, programs and practices. Focused on the interlinkages and interdependence of its priority issues, WEDO works to uphold existing legal frameworks and support governments, civil society partners and UN agencies alike in turning words into action.
 
Civil society access to and participation in global decision-making fora is a critical part of good global governance. From UN processes at headquarters, to meaningful engagement and partnership with country offices, WEDO supports information-sharing between and engagement of non-governmental voices. Visit the “Civil Society Participation” page for more on this work.

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Reports & Resources

Climate Change Connections: Gender & Population

A comprehensive resource kit from UNFPA and WEDO on gender, population and climate change. Learn how gender equality can reduce vulnerability to climate change impacts and how women are uniquely positioned to help curb the harmful consequences of a changing climate (2009).

2008 Annual Report: Building Alliances, Making Milestones

We invite you to imagine how the actions we take together bring us closer to our goal of a healthy and peaceful planet, social and economic justice and human rights for all.

Newsletter - WEDO News & Views


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Graduate Fellowships and Undergraduate Internships

Fellowship and internship applications (for graduate students and undergrads, respectively,) are accepted on a semester basis, reviewed in April, August and December and on a rolling basis when capacity permits . The duration of each fellowship/internship depends on the needs of the fellow/intern and WEDO programs. A minimum two-month commitment is required and applicants available for longer commitments are encouraged. Fellows/interns will conduct research and writing, provide administrative assistance, attend meetings, and undertake other tasks as necessary, under the direction of the relevant programmatic staff.


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International Center for Research on Women

ICRW's mission is to empower women, advance gender equality and fight poverty in the developing world. To accomplish this, ICRW works with partners to conduct empirical research, build capacity and advocate for evidence-based, practical ways to change policies and programs.

Contact

1120 20th St. N.W.
Washington, DC 20036
Ph. (202) 797-0007
Fx. (202) 797-0020
http://www.icrw.org
info@icrw.org


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Principal Staff

Sarah Degnan Kambou, President

Lyric Thompson, Special Assistant to the President/Policy Advocate

Kristin Fack, Administrative Assistant
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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Adolescents

ICRW has been examining the lives of adolescents – especially girls – for more than two decades. Our work focuses on improving their well-being and identifying ways to change deeply entrenched traditional practices that prevent girls and young women from reaching their full potential. We believe that making the abilities, attitudes and options of adolescent girls and boys more equitable is one of the most effective ways to empower women. And our research shows that all aspects of young people’s lives – school, relationships, work, health and marriage – must be addressed in order to bring about lasting social change. Adolescent programs and policies require working with not only girls, but boys, parents, teachers, community members, leaders, schools and employers, too.
 
 
ICRW has been examining for more than 30 years how disparities between women and men affect agricultural productivity and food security. Our research helps development organizations, policymakers and others find practical ways to enhance women’s roles in agricultural production and trade, thereby improving their incomes and livelihoods.

ICRW analyzes the differences between the responsibilities, limitations and interests of male and female farmers to design strategies that provide services, training and incomes. Our findings and recommendations help identify sound approaches that ensure efforts reach women as well as men. Ultimately, we aim to help farmers become competitive participants in the agricultural marketplace and reap the financial benefits.
 
 
Economic development efforts to combat poverty can only succeed if women are part of the solution. Doing so yields a double dividend: When women are economically empowered, they raise healthier, better educated families. Their countries are more economically prosperous because of it, too.

Since our founding more than 30 years ago, ICRW's work has expanded understanding of women's economic contributions as well as the hurdles that prevent them from being successful. Our efforts focus on how gender affects economic development efforts related to assets and property rights as well as employment, enterprise development and financial services.
 
We strive to increase women's ownership, use and control of assets and property. We want to empower women as economic agents and better their ability to access markets on competitive and equitable terms. And with our partners, ICRW aims to integrate gender perspectives into program and institution activities. We believe such an approach improves the likelihood that efforts to strengthen women economically are successful.
 
 
ICRW was among the first organizations in the early 1990s to call attention to how gender inequality fueled the transmission of HIV and AIDS among women. Today, ICRW continues to push the AIDS agenda forward. As the global response moves from a focus on crisis management into a sustained, long-term strategy, our work centers around how HIV programs and policies can better serve the needs of women and girls. We work with partners to design, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of programs that strive to reduce women's social and biological vulnerability to HIV. We also aim to weave these programs into existing family planning, reproductive and maternal health services. Ultimately, we strive to influence national policies by guiding governments and others on how to address the role that gender norms play in the prevention, support and treatment of HIV.
 
 
ICRW strives to demonstrate that improved sexual and reproductive health outcomes are pre-conditions for achieving gender equality, empowering women and reducing global poverty. ICRW’s research in this area aims to build a sound evidence base to inform programs and policies by defining the fundamental connections between gender, reproductive health and development, highlighting the importance of adolescent transitions to adulthood, analyzing means for facilitating women’s access to safe and effective reproductive control options, and undertaking rigorous evaluations to demonstrate what works.
 
Our approach examines how gender equality is both a determinant and a consequence of demographic change. For example, our current research suggests that as fertility rates decline in developing countries, women gain increased access to higher education and formal employment opportunities. This in turn can facilitate more transformative shifts in gender relations. Findings such as these bolster the policy directive that advancing women’s and girls’ reproductive health creates conditions that improve the quality of life for individuals, families, communities and nations.
 
 
ICRW employs a multifaceted approach to reducing violence against women. We conduct empirical research to better understand the incidence of violence, costs associated with it and factors that lead to it. We also are building evidence on interventions designed to prevent violence against women, particularly comprehensive approaches that include economically empowering women, involving boys and men, protecting survivors of violence and rehabilitating men who are abusive. ICRW is examining the policy dimensions of violence prevention by evaluating the impact of and challenges to existing legislation and using our findings to advocate for stronger, more effective laws. Finally, ICRW participates in strategic regional and global networks that work to strengthen civil society and advance the field of preventing violence against women.

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Reports & Resources

For all publications, click here.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Click here for current employment opportunities.


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Front and Center: Women in Science, Environment and Technology

May 18, 2009 posted by admin


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