Environment, Sustainability & Energy

Gender is a leading factor for understanding the intersections of the environment, sustainability and energy. The poor (disproportionately women) are at a particular disadvantage from environmental degradation and lack of access to clean water and adequate, affordable energy. Women’s primary role in agricultural production, food preparation and water and fuel collection positions them as vital partners in building and implementing sound environmental policies. Investing in women is one of the most effective ways to advance sustainable development and fight global climate change. The diverse roles and needs of women must be recognized and addressed in programs ranging from rural development to green job creation and urban revitalization. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Feminism and Climate Change

By Kyla Bender-Baird

This Saturday I trudged through the snow to attend the 35th Scholar and Feminist Conference put on by the Barnard Center for Research on Women. Quite appropriately, considering the recent weather, we were discussing feminism and climate change. Commenting on the nearly 36 inches of snow dumped on New York City, Janet Jakobsen, director of BCRW, asked in her welcoming remarks, “Is this a once in a century event or a sign of global climate change?”


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ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT FORUM: Child Care and Green Jobs Key to Women’s Lasting Economic Security

By Sara K. Gould*

Linda Basch: How has ARRA impacted our economy from a local, community, or individual/family perspective?

Sara Gould: ARRA has provided a crucial injection of support to states during the worst of our nation’s current economic crisis. Take child care, for example: several states have used the funding to prevent budget cuts; some have reduced waiting lists for subsidized child care; and others have worked to improve the quality of child-care delivery.


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ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT FORUM: Green Recovery for a Few--Why Equity is Necessary to Ensure Green Jobs for Women and POC

By Yvonne Liu*

One year has passed since the Obama administration enacted the $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the largest boon to public spending and the safety net since the New Deal. Last week, President Obama linked economic recovery to investments in clean energy and green job creation in his State of the Union address.


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Does Women’s Proportional Strength Affect their Participation? Governing Local Forests in South Asia

Date/Time: 
03/30/2010

Bina Agarwal, Professor of Economics, Institute of Economic Growth, University of Delhi

Earth Day

Date/Time: 
04/22/2010

Earth Day

Women and Public Space

November 11, 2009 posted by Cheryl Huber*

Last month, NCRW staffer Kyla Bender-Baird spoke on a panel hosted by NYU Wagner Women's Caucus along with Cheryl Huber of New Yorkers for Parks and The International Women's Health Coalition's Khushbu Srivastava.  The panel discussed "The Impact of Women in Public Service."  Cheryl's comments on the intersections of gender and urban planning brought up an often over-looked perspective. 


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Front and Center: Women in Science, Environment and Technology

May 18, 2009 posted by admin


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VIOLENCE FORUM: Beyond Firewood

December 19, 2008 posted by Shyama Venkateswar

An op-ed just came across our desk that we wanted to share, as part of this week's Violence Forum here at TRD.  In a Boston Globe op-ed this week, Liv Ullmann, reminds us of the violence suffered by refugees in Darfur, Nepal, and Kenya.  Writes Ullmann:

For thousands of these impoverished women and girls, gathering firewood is more than a vital chore - it is often a matter of life and death. By doing what many of us achieve by simply turning on a stove, refugee women and girls regularly fall victim to rape, assault, theft, exploitation, and even murder... It's high time we get "beyond firewood" and explore alternative fuels and cutting-edge energy technologies, such as clean-burning fuels, fuel-efficient stoves, and solar cookers, Ullmann says.  We need to reduce women’s vulnerability to violence by investing in alternative sources of fuel that do not require women to travel long distances to collect firewood. 


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