Health, Reproductive Rights & Sexuality

Full equality for women and girls can be attained only when they have the information and services they need to lead healthy lives and make informed and independent decisions about their health, reproductive health and sexuality. Health for women depends on many factors, including access to safe water and nutritious food; affordable care and insurance; disease prevention and access to comprehensive reproductive and maternal health services; and awareness and support for women with HIV/AIDS and other diseases and disabilities. Health is not limited to physical well-being but extends to sexuality, mental health and body image as well. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

State of the World's Mothers 2012: Nutrition in the First 1,000 Days

Save the Children’s State of The World's Mothers Report Ranks Niger as the Worst Country in the World to be a Mother

The report shows how low cost solutions like breastfeeding and basic hygiene can save more than 1 million children’s lives each year. Read the report, watch the videos and share info graphics. Then sign our petition to urge World Leaders to support child survival solutions.

URL: 
www.savethechildren.org/world-mothers

Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading? Canada’s Treatment of Federally-Sentenced Women with Mental Health Issues

The International Human Rights Program’s damning report, Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading?
URL: 
http://www.utorontoihrp.com/index.php/ihrp-news/8-ihrp-news/121-canadas-management-of-prisoners-with-serious-mental-health-issues-violates-international-law

Pay Matters: The Positive Economic Impacts of Paid Family Leave for Families, Businesses and the Public

With a growing need for family-friendly workplace policies, a new study commissioned by the National Partnership for Women & Families, with support from the Rockefeller Foundation, concludes that providing paid family leave to workers leads to positive economic outcomes for working families, businesses and the public.
 
The research, conducted by the Center for Women and Work at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, finds that women who use paid leave are far more likely to be working nine to 12 months after a child’s birth than those who do not take any leave.
URL: 
http://smlr.rutgers.edu/paymatters-cwwreport-january2012
Member Organization: 

An Early Assessment of the Potential Impact of Texas’ “Affiliation” Regulation on Access to Care for Low-income Women

As a federal appeals court considers the legality of Texas’ family planning “affiliation regulation,” a new report provides a preliminary assessment of the impact of the Texas rule on preventive care access by low-income women.

“An Early Assessment of the Potential Impact of Texas’ “Affiliation” Regulation on Access to Care for Low-income Women,” released by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative, reports on the impact of Texas’ “affiliation rule” on access to cancer screening, preventive health care, and family planning services by low-income women.

URL: 
http://www.gwumc.edu/sphhs/departments/healthpolicy/dhp_publications/pub_uploads/dhpPublication_0900DA16-5056-9D20-3DFD539FF662D155.pdf

Women’s Well-Being: Ranking America’s Top 25 Metro Areas

A report from Measure of America, a project of the Social Science Research Council.

URL: 
http://www.measureofamerica.org/womens_wellbeing
Syndicate content