Human Security

Measuring the Gender Asset Gap in Ghana

 There is an increasing recognition that the ownership of, access to and control over assets constitute a critical element in the determination of the well-being of households and individuals. Owing largely to data constraints, however, there has been a tendency for studies on assets and well-being/poverty to use the household as the unit of analysis. Such an approach tends to ignore the importance of intra-household disparities in asset ownership and well-being. Moreover, the dearth of individual-level data on asset ownership makes it extremely difficult to analyze gender disparities in asset ownership, wealth and well-being. As rightly noted by Grown et al. (2005), this lack of data seriously hampers efforts to track the progress of countries toward the Millennium Development Goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment.

URL: 
http://genderassetgap.iimb.ernet.in/articles/project-publications

The Right to Food, Gender Equality and Economic Policy

This report is the culmination of a two-day experts meeting, “The Right to Food, Gender Equality and Economic Policy,” which took place on September 16-17, 2011 at the Center for Women’s Global Leadership (CWGL). The meeting was organized as a means to contribute to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food’s work on gender equality, including a final report for the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2013. To this end, CWGL brought together economists, researchers and advocates, working from a feminist perspective on various aspects of the food system, to offer analysis and recommendations.

URL: 
http://www.cwgl.rutgers.edu/globalcenter/publications/Right%20to%20Food.pdf

What the Women Say: The Arab Spring and Implications for Women

 ICAN's first MENA regional issue brief. 


As the Arab world rumbles and shakes, women in the region are experiencing the good, the bad and the ugly that comes with instability, transition and crisis. From Tunisia and Egypt to Syria, Libya and Bahrain, women have been present and vocal in the street protest movements, standing shoulder to shoulder with the men, resisting the batons and tear gas, and being killed. Many have been key organizers and leaders in social networking, helping to articulate a common message and vision of freedom, democracy and equality, and providing logistical support to men at the frontlines of violence. They have also faced many of the
same physical and sexual threats and risks that women elsewhere have encountered during crises and transitions, including harassment, assault and death.

Despite their contribution, they are again facing exclusion from the political processes under way.

URL: 
http://www.icanpeacework.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/ICAN17.pdf
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