Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Women Making Gains on Faculty at Harvard

 

By TAMAR LEWIN

 

Published: March 12, 2010

 

 

Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

In an era when women are increasingly prominent in medicine, law and business, why are there so few women scientists and engineers? A new research report by AAUW presents compelling evidence that can help to explain this puzzle. Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics presents in-depth yet accessible profiles of eight key research findings that point to environmental and social barriers – including stereotypes, gender bias and the climate of science and engineering departments in colleges and universities – that continue to block women’s participation and progress in science, technology, engineering, and math. The report also includes up to date statistics on girls' and women's achievement and participation in these areas and offers new ideas for what each of us can do to more fully open scientific and engineering fields to girls and women.

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/resource/why-so-few-women-in-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics/

NCRW Summary: Economic Recovery in the Cities

FEBRUARY 1, 2010 Representatives from New York City and surrounding cities gathered at Columbia University to discuss economic recovery in a citywide context. This discussion, hosted by David N. Dinkins, emphasized that U.S. cities and their metropolitan areas were hardest hit by this economic recession. The speakers and panelists examined the impact of President Obama’s policies on the economic challenges in the NY-NJ-Penn region.

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for women in Science, Engineering, and Technology.   

WOMEN IN CHEMISTRY SYMPOSIUM

Date/Time: 
03/16/2010

WOMEN IN CHEMISTRY SYMPOSIUM

All WST Center Events are co-sponsored with ADVANCE, free, and open to the public. Please RSVP to Irina Nikiforova if you are interested in attending.

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