Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

University of Arizona Southwest Institute for Research on Women

Established at the University of Arizona in 1976 the University of Arizona's Women in Science and Technology (WISE) program encourages women to become leaders in the fields of science and technology. More information can be found here: http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

URL: 
http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

The Center’s program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS)

The Center's program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS) was featured in a recent addition of the Atlanta Journal Constitution. The front-page article featured Inman Middle School's GEMS club. The middle schoolers work with students from Georgia Tech's Center for the Study of Women, Science & Technology. The article can be found here:

URL: 
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/stories/2009/02/09/girlscience0209.html

THE GIRLS REPORT: What We Know & Need to Know About Growing Up Female

"Seven years ago the National Council for Research on Women and its member centers issued major reports on the status of girls in society, in schools, and in youth organizations in the United States. Since then, university researchers and popular writers have focussed attention on girls. The Girls Report is a fresh and timely look at every aspect of life for girls as we look toward the new millenium.

"If the reports in the early 1990s struck a chord of concern and a call to action, the tone of this report is optimism and activism. As we say at Girls Incorporated, girls are strong, smart and bold unless society puts barriers in their way. Lynn Phillips and the National Council staff have captured the strength, the energy, and the possibilities of girls on their way to becoming young women, while calling on the rest of us to be vigilant in supporting girls' high hopes and expectations for their own achievement."

Teaser: 

The Girls Report surveys current studies on girls, mapping theoretical debates, countering popular myths with recent research findings, and highlighting successful programs serving diverse populations. Chapters on education, health, self-esteem, violence, sexuality, and economic realities conclude with clear recommendations for action. A comprehensive bibliography offers resources to educators, researchers, policymakers, and all concerned with increasing opportunities for girls.

Cover Image: 

Balancing the Equation: Where are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering, and Technology?

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by NCRW, now Re:Gender network members. Also included are Recommendations, which emphasize that an increase in women and girls' participation in all levels of science, engineering and technology requires strong leadership, changes in cultural values and practices, and systemic reform.

Click here to order a copy.

Teaser: 

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by Re:Gender network members.

TO ORDER A COPY, Download Order Form.

 

Cover Image: 

Front and Center: Women in Science, Environment and Technology

May 18, 2009 posted by admin


<< Back to the Full Blog

Science for Everyone

Adler Planetarium Oct 15, 2008 SCIENCE FOR EVERYONE By Veronica Arreola, Director of the Women in Science and Engineering program at the University of Illinois-Chicago


<< Back to the Full Blog

Syndicate content