Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

“Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy,” Susan Kaufmann (2008)

"Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy," Susan Kaufmann (2008), explores barriers girls and women experience while outlining actions that state and federal government, local school boards, colleges and universities, and Michigan families can take to ensure that women take their full place in the highly-trained technology workforce.

URL: 
http://www.umich.edu/~cew/
Member Organization: 

University of Arizona Southwest Institute for Research on Women

Established at the University of Arizona in 1976 the University of Arizona's Women in Science and Technology (WISE) program encourages women to become leaders in the fields of science and technology. More information can be found here: http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

URL: 
http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

The Center’s program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS)

The Center's program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS) was featured in a recent addition of the Atlanta Journal Constitution. The front-page article featured Inman Middle School's GEMS club. The middle schoolers work with students from Georgia Tech's Center for the Study of Women, Science & Technology. The article can be found here:

URL: 
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/stories/2009/02/09/girlscience0209.html

Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Founded in 1974, the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University creates knowledge and seeks to implement change to promote gender equality. Our current focus is Moving Beyond the Stalled Gender Revolution. We are bringing together an intellectually diverse group of scholars to provide new insights into the barriers to women's advancement and to propose novel and workable solutions to advancing gender equality.

Contact

589 Capistrano Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8640
Ph. (650) 723-1994
Fx. (650) 725-0374
http://gender.stanford.edu/
gender-email@stanford.edu


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Principal Staff

Lori Nishiura Mackenzie, Executive Director
PH. (650) 723-1994
Email: lorim@stanford.edu

Shelley J. Correll, Director, Clayman Institute
Ph. (650) 723-1994
E-mail: scorrell@stanford.edu

Ann Enthoven, Program Manager
E-mail: ann.enthoven@stanford.edu

Andrea Rees Davies, Director of Programs and Research
E-mail: ardavies@stanford.edu

Wendy Skidmore, Program Associate

Marion Groh Marquardt, Web Specialist
Email: marionm@stanford.edu
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Ms. at 40 and the Future of Feminism

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Ms. magazine in January 2012 at Stanford University. A keynote speech by Ms. founding editor, Gloria Steinem, will be the centerpiece of a Winter Quarter series of events that looks back on what Ms. has meant to its readers over the last 40 years and that looks ahead to what feminism may mean for the next generation.  
 
 
According to national studies, women hold more than half of all professional occupations in the U.S. but fewer than 24 percent of all computing-related occupations, representing a huge pool of untapped talent. The numbers are not moving in favor of increasing women's participation in technology; in 2008 women earned only 18 percent of all computer science degrees. Back in 1985, women earned 37 percent of CS degrees, nearly double today's share.

The Clayman Institute for Gender Research conducted two studies looking at the participation of women in technology and offering new ideas and solutions for increasing the role women play in the development and use of technology.
 
 
The lectures will take place in Winter Quarter at Stanford University. Lecturers will be selected competitively. Nominations by must include a description of the contribution of the nominee to advancing gender equality. Special emphasis will be placed on inviting women of color, women who reach across traditional disciplinary boundaries, and women who play a public role in advancing gender equality. Nominations are accepted on a rolling basis as lecture slots are still available. Nominators are encouraged to contact the Clayman Institute [email] to discuss potential nominees and nomination requirements prior to submitting a nomination.
 
The Clayman Institute will provide publicity and will cover the costs of travel, a small honorarium, and networking events and meals.
 
 
"Art at the Institute" exhibits artists, female and male, whose work critically engages with contemporary discourses around gender. Work seen at Serra House ranges from paintings to photography, computer manipulated images, weaving, prints, and mixed media, and illustrates artists' rich use of imagery, form, political perspectives, and grrrl attitude. The program will highlight the ways contemporary art takes part in the ongoing dialogues surrounding gender. 
 
 
The Clayman Institute supports efforts that translate our research and programs into actions for change. We have posted videos, discussion guides, and other ways to keep the conversation going. Sometimes, research is the first stop on the way to change.

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Reports & Resources

 
Meeting the needs and expectations of dual-career academic couples - while still ensuring the high quality of university faculty - is one of the great challenges facing universities. Academic couples (those with both partners working in an academic environment) represent a deep pool of talent. Yet, dual-career academic hiring often remains difficult and controversial. The Clayman Institute's 2008 study, Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need to Know, surveyed 30,000 faculty at 13 of the nation's leading public and private research universities. The report reviews practices, policies and programs for administrators to successfully work with the hiring and retaining of dual-career academic couples. Our pages contain resources for academic institutions and dual-career couples alike.

Aging

Yalom, Marilyn & Carstensen, Laura (eds). Inside the American Couple. ( Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002>

Difficult Dialogues Program - Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Aging in the 21st Century consensus report. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University, 2002)

Economic and social status of women

Clayman Institute. 2008. Climbing The Tech Ladder; Obstacles and Solutions for Mid-Level Women in Information Technology. Written by A. Henderson, C. Simard, S. Gilmartin, L. Schiebinger, and T. Whitney.

Strober, Myra and Agnes Miling Keneko Chan. The Road Winds Uphill All the Way: Gender, Work, and Family in the United States and Japan. (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1999)

Family

Clayman Institute. 2008. Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need To Know. Written by L. Schiebinger, A. Henderson, and S. Gilmartin.

Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Wife. ( New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers Inc., 2001)

Yalom, Marilyn and Thorne, Barrie (eds). Rethinking the Family. (Albany, NY: State University New York Press, 1990)

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Rhode, Deborah L. Speaking of Sex: The Denial of Gender Inequality. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997)

Rhode, Deborah L. Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Difference. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990)

Boxer, Marilyn Jacoby. When Women Ask the Questions: Creating Women's Studies in America. (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998)

Freedman, Estelle. No Turning Back. ( Westminster, MD: Ballantine Books, 2002)

Global Issues

Walker-Moffat, Wendy. The Other Side of the Asian American Success Story. (San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995)

Mahadevi Varma. Translated by Neera Kuckerja Sohoni. Sketches from My Past: Encounters with India's Oppressed. (Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 1997)

Mankekar, Purnima. Screening Culture, Viewing Politics: Television, Womanhood and Nation in Modern India. ( Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000)

Zheng, Wang. Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories. (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, Berkeley, 1999)

Health and Health Care

Litt, Iris. Taking Our Pulse: The Health of America's Women. (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1997)

History

Freedman, Estelle. Maternal Justice: Miriam Van Waters and the Female Reform Tradition. (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1996)

Gelles, Edith. First Thoughts: Life and Letters of Abigail Adams. (New York, NY: Twayne Publishers, 1998)

Gelles, Edith. Portia: The World of Abigail Adams. (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1992)

McCurry, Stephanie. Masters of Small Worlds: Yeoman Households, Gender Relations and the Political Culture of Antebellum South Carolina Low Country. (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1995)

Offen, Karen. European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000)

Schiebinger, Londa. Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World ( Harvard University Press, 2004)
Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Breast. (New York, NY: Knopf, 1997)

Science

Schiebinger, L., (ed.). 2008. Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering. Stanford University Press, 2008 was published on March 12, 2008.  

Schiebinger, Londa. Nature's Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science (Beacon Press, 1993; Rutgers University Press, 2004)

Schiebinger, Londa. Has Feminism Changed Science? (Harvard University Press, 1999)

Schiebinger, Londa. The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Harvard University Press, 1989)

Sexuality

Lewin, Ellen. Inventing Lesbian Cultures in America. (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1996)

Mintz, Beth & Rothblum, Esther (eds). Lesbians in Academia: Degrees of Freedom. (New York, NY: Routledge, 1997)


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

The Clayman Institute offers a two-year postdoctoral fellowship that focus on the Institute's theme, "Beyond the Stalled Revolution: Reinvigorating Gender Equality in the Twenty-first Century." Recent Ph.D.'s in all disciplines of the humanities and social sciences whose research focuses on gender are eligible. We encourage scholars with a strong interest in interdisciplinary methods to apply. While in residence at the Institute, Postdoctoral Scholars are expected to participate in Clayman Institute activities throughout the academic year in addition to pursuing their own research.

Graduate Dissertation Fellowships

The Clayman Institute’s Graduate Dissertation Fellowships (GDF) are awarded to outstanding Stanford doctoral students who are engaged in research on women and/or gender. The fellowships will provide financial support for top gender scholars as they complete their dissertations, while encouraging interdisciplinary connections for their research. Clayman GDFs will have offices at the Clayman Institute, where they will participate in the intellectual life of the Clayman Institute as well as take part in professional development workshops during the academic year.  GDFs will be contributing to the writing and research efforts of the Clayman Institute. Fellowship funding is for three quarters: two quarters of research assistantship and one quarter teaching assistantship. In addition to the stipend, GDFs will receive $1,000 in research funding.

Marilyn Yalom Research Fund

The Marilyn Yalom Research Fund supports currently enrolled Stanford Ph.D. candidates working in the humanities on issues concerning women and gender in the humanities.  The research funds support original research or conference costs. Dr. Yalom has been part of the Clayman Institute since 1978, having served as both Associate Director and Acting Director. She is currently a Senior Scholar, and is well known as an internationally acclaimed historian of women's and gender issues.

Majorie Lozoff Graduate Prize

The Marjorie Lozoff Prize is awarded annually by the Marjorie Lozoff Fund for Research on Women and Gender to promote scholarship in areas that further women's development. All currently registered Stanford University graduate students, in any academic or professional discipline, are eligible. The range of research topics include, but are not limited to: men and women's role within the family; the role of women and gender in science, medicine, and engineering; women's participation in the professions and other areas of work; women as entrepreneurs; women and gender in developing societies; women and gender cross-culturally. Preference will be given to original research on current social issues.

Myra Strober Prize

The Myra Strober Prize honors the best Gender News article written by a Stanford graduate or undergraduate student.  The $1,500 annual prize highlights news articles about women’s education, work, family, or the nexus of work and family.


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Women's Research & Resource Center

The Spelman College Women’s Research & Resource Center embraces our unique identity and claims our pioneering role among historically Black and women’s colleges firmly rooted in the liberal arts tradition. We are committed to creating a global community of progressive women and men who envision a world free from injustice, exploitation, violence, poverty, waste, greed, illness, and misogyny. We are especially opposed to practices and images that debase African American and other women of color. 

Through curricular innovation, scholarship, activism and collaborations, the Women’s Center is educating future generation of free-thinking, unapologetic Black women who will document our stories, advocate for our rights, and join with others in the ongoing struggle to transform our communities and rescue the planet!

Principal Staff

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: bsheftal@spelman.edu

M. Bahati Kuumba, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: kuumba@spelman.edu

Ayoka Chenzira, Director of Digital Moving Salon
E-mail: chenzira@spelman.edu

Lillie Picard, Administrative Assistant
Ph. (404) 270-5625
E-mail: lpicard@spelman.edu

Dana Pride Jones, Program Coordinator
Ph. (404) 270-5627
E-mail: dpjones@spelman.edu
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Another premier component of the program is the Digital Moving Image Salon, which teaches students how to make films. Launched in 2004 by Dr. Ayoka Chenzira, an award-winning, internationally acclaimed film and video digital media artist, and the College’s first Cosby Chair, DMIS serves as a learning space, training ground, and production studio for students interested in documentary film making and digital media productions.
 
Juliana Montgomery graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in film studies from Spelman in 2006. She has the distinction of being Spelman's first graduate in the independent major she created, and was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Among the works that she associate produced was the 2009 Emmy Award-winning Coca-Cola advertisement, “Heist.”
“Spelman’s comparative women’s studies department not only supported my independent major and course of study, it made possible an environment through which my understanding of images of women – especially of women of color – within the visual media, could be realized,” said Montgomery.

Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference

Named for feminist author, scholar, activist and filmmaker Toni Cade Bambara, the conference acknowledges her legacy of scholarship and social activism.

“Year after year we’ve been able to motivate students to engage in creative ways to celebrate the life and legacy of one of our most important sheroes,” said Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D., founding director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center. “No one else remembers Toni Cade Bambara annually in the ways we do, and for that, I am sure the people she impacted for so many years, including me, are very grateful.”
 
The two-day conference is developed and facilitated by Spelman students who are led by Bahati Kuumba, Ph.D., associate professor of women's studies, and associate director of the Women's Research and Resource Center. It features paper presentations, workshops and performance pieces that delve into dimensions of Black/African women’s lives, scholarship and social change activism.

"The conference brings awareness to issues related to women of African descent and women of color who have been actively engaged in using their knowledge and organizational skills to forward social justice," said Kuumba.

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Center News

Girl Scouts of the USA

Founded in 1912, the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), has long been preparing girls for leadership roles. As the largest voluntary organization for girls in the world, the Girl Scouts are committed to peaking the interest and listening to the voices of millions of girls, as well as the women and men who serve them. The purpose of Girl Scouting is to inspire girls with the highest ideals of character and conduct, so that they may become capable and inspired citizens. Girl Scouting seeks to accomplish this goal through innovative programs that provide girls with opportunities to explore the world's possibilities while having fun with their peers in supportive, all-girl settings.

Contact

420 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10018-2798
Ph. (212) 852-8000 / 1 800 478-7248
Fx. (212) 852-6509/6510
http://www.girlscouts.org



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Principal Staff

Anna Maria Chávez, CEO

Connie L. Lindsey, Chair of the National Board of Directors

Nhadine Leung, Chief of Staff

Delphia York Duckens, Senior Vice President, Fund Development

Jaclyn E. Libowitz, Chief of Staff

Florence Corsello, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Business Services

Danny Boockvar, Chief Customer Officer, Girl Scouts of the USA

Deb Taft, Chief Development Officer, Girl Scouts of the USA

Michael Watson, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Girl Scouts of the USA
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The National Program Portfolio

The National Program Portfolio has two main parts – the National Leadership Journeys and the all new The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting. Complemented by the Girl Scout Cookie program, Girl Scout travel and Girl Scout awards, the National Program Portfolio is designed to help girls develop as leaders and build confidence by learning new skills. It also ensures that Girl Scouts at every level are sharing a powerful, national experience—girls together changing the world!

Journeys

On every Leadership Journey, everything girls do—whether it's performing science experiments, creating art projects, cooking simple meals, or learning to protect the planet's water supply—is aimed at giving them the benefits of the Girl Scout "Keys to Leadership": Discover, Connect, Take Action.

Girl's Guide

Everyone knows that Girl Scouts have badges. But The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting has more than just exciting, new badges for every age level. Each guide contains: 

-A colorful, easy-to-use binder specially designed for girls at each level. The binder comes chock full of essential information and badge activities—plus girls get to customize their own experience by choosing and adding in additional badge sets.

-Legacy, Financial Literacy, and Cookie Business badge activities—or, for Girl Scout Daisies, petal and leaf activities. For more information about the National Proficiency badges, check out How the National Girl Scout Program Portfolio Works.

-A detailed diagram showing where girls place the badges, pins, or awards with pride on their vests or sashes.
Ideas to help girls tie their badges right into their Journeys.
 
-Vintage illustrations and quotes from Girl Scout history to help girls feel connected to the proud traditions of the past.
An awards log showing girls every award and badge available at their level, as well as the entire badge program at every level, so girls can see how their skills will grow in Girl Scouting.
 
Highest Awards
 
We know you want to do good things for the world. Help the people who need it most. Protect animals that can't speak for themselves. Treat the environment with the respect it deserves. We know you have great ideas, ones that make a lasting difference. And that you're more than ready to work hard to put those ideas into motion. Girl Scouting's highest awards—the Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards—are your chance to make a lasting difference in your community . . . and in the larger world. Click below. And start changing the world today!
 
Travel
 
Every girl deserves a chance to see the world. Girl Scouts offers many different travel opportunities so girls can see new places, meet new people, and learn about different cultures and ideas. Whether exploring their own neighborhoods, going on overnight camping trips, participating in community service projects, or flying to one of the four world centers, Girl Scouts are continually expanding their horizons.
 
Girl Scout Cookies
 
When a Girl Scout sells you cookies, she's building a lifetime of skills and confidence. She learns goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics—aspects essential to leadership, to success, and to life.
By putting her mind and energies to something, a Girl Scout can overcome any challenge. There are no limits. She can be anything. She can do anything.
 
Program Basics
 
Girl Scouts earn badges, hike and camp, participate in the cookie program, and much more. They improve neighborhoods, protect the planet, design robots, and establish sports clinics. See what a great Girl Scout year can look like for each grade level by visiting Girl Scout GPS!
 
Girl Scout program starts girls off on a Journey of their choice from the National Leadership Journeys series. They'll earn awards, have fun, and take on projects that change the world.
 
Girls then add The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting to their program portfolio. TheGirl's Guide offers girls national proficiency badges, traditions and history, an awards log, and much more. Let Brownie Elf walk you through a fun video (below) describing the Girl's Guide. For complete information about what girls from kindergarten through high school do in Girl Scouts and the awards they can earn, please see the main Program page.

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Reports & Resources

 
While lack of financial literacy is a growing concern for everyone today, relatively little research has been done on how young people think about and experience money and finances, with even fewer studies focusing on girls specifically. To address this gap, the Girl Scout Research Institute conducted a nationwide survey with over 1,000 girls ages 8−17 and their parents to better understand girls' level of financial literacy and their confidence about, attitudes towards, and experiences with money. Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy reveals that girls need and want financial literacy skills to help them achieve their dreams, with 90 percent saying it is important for them to learn how to manage money. However, just 12 percent of girls surveyed feel "very confident" making financial decisions.

Financial Literacy

Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy (2013)

Girls and Media

The Net Effect: Girls and New Media (2002)

Beauty Redefined: Girls and Body Image Survey (2010)

Who's That Girl: Image and Social Media Survey (2010)

Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV (2011)

Girl Leadership, Beliefs, and Values

The Resilience Factor: A Key to Leadership in African American and Hispanic Girls (2011)

Good Intentions: The Beliefs and Values of Teens and Tweens Today (2009)

Transforming Leadership Continued (2009)

The New Leadership Landscape: What Girls Say About Election 2008 (2009)

Transforming Leadership: Focusing on Outcomes of the New Girl Scout Leadership Experience (2008)

Change It Up! What Girls Say About Redefining Leadership (2008)

Exploring Girls' Leadership (2007)

Girl Scouts Survey on The Beliefs and Moral Values of America's Children (1989)

Girl and Youth Development

Paths to Positive Youth Development (2003)

The Ten Emerging Truths: New Directions for Girls 11-17 (2002)

Snapshots of Young Lives Today (2001)

Healthy Living

Beauty Redefined: Girls and Body Image Survey (2010)

The New Normal? What Girls Say About Healthy Living (2006)

Weighing In: Helping Girls Be Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow (2004)

Feeling Safe: What Girls Say (2003)

How America's Youth Are Faring Since September 11th (2002)

Teens Before Their Time (2000)

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (2012)

The Net Effect: Girls and New Media (2002)

The Girl Difference: Short-Circuiting the Myth of the Technophobic Girl (2001)

Volunteerism

Voices of Volunteers 18-29 (2003)

The Community Connection: Volunteer Trends in a Changing World (2002)

National Profile of Adults in Girl Scouting: Executive Summary (1998)

Girl Scout Outcomes

Linking Leadership to Academic Success: The Girl Scout Difference (2012)

Mapping the Girl Scout Leadership Experience Outcomes to the Search Institute's Youth Developmental Assets(2012)

Transforming Leadership Continued (2009)**

Transforming Leadership: Focusing on Outcomes of the New Girl Scout Leadership Experience (2008)**

Girl Scouts Beyond Bars Evaluation Report (2008)**

GirlSports Basics National Evaluation (2003)

Junior Girl Scout Group Experience: Outcomes Measurement Guide (2002)

Tool Kit data analysis supplement (2001)

Tool Kit for Measuring Outcomes of Girl Scout Resident Camp (2000)

Girls, Families, and Communities Grow Through Girl Scouting (1997)

Girl Scouting

Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact Study (2012)

Defining Success: American Women, Achievement, and the Girl Scouts (1999)

National Profile of Adults in Girl Scouting: Executive Summary (1998)

Strength in Diversity: Toward a Broader Understanding of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Girl Scouting: Final Report (1994)

The Girl Scout Experience Among Young Girls Today: Towards a Marketing Strategy for Girl Scouting (1992)

Girl Scouts: Its Role in the Lives of American Women of Distinction (1991)

Girl Scouts: Who We Are, What We Think (1990)


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Center News

Wellesley Centers for Women

At the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), Wellesley College, we believe that disciplined, relevant research and theory paired with innovative training and action programs are key building blocks for social progress.
 
Since 1974, WCW has conducted interdisciplinary studies on issues such as: gender equity in education, sexual harassment in schools, child care, adolescent development, gender violence, and women’s leadership—studies that have influenced private practices and public policy.
 
WCW staff members provide professional development for educators, child caregivers, and youth workers that encourage children’s social-emotional development and enhance learning environments and safety.
 
Other WCW scholars have dedicated themselves to the prevention of psychological problems, the enhancement of psychological well-being, and the search for a more comprehensive understanding of human deve

Contact

106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481-8203
Ph. 781-283-2500
Fx. 781-283-2504
http://www.wcwonline.org
newswcw@wellesley.edu


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Child and Adolescent Development

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research studies and evaluations on issues related to child and adolescent development, including issues around race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and identity; the effects of early child care; the value of physical activity; preventing depression; examining unique family dynamics; and exploring sexuality and evaluating sex-education programming.

Childcare

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have studied the ability of public schools to prepare young children for lifelong learning and have shaped local, state, and federal policies. Our groundbreaking research, policy development, and training programs set the standards for out-of-school time, and continue to inform the field in new areas, including physical activity programming.

 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) have conducted research on a range of educational issues, including quality early education; equitable opportunities in STEM fields and literacy; and bullying prevention and sex-education programming. Scholars and trainers from WCW have also developed curricula and facilitated programs that promote equity and diversity and social-emotional learning in educational settings. Our research has raised public consciousness about serious education issues and has informed public policy.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted numerous research studies on issues related to gender violence, including bullying- and sexual harassment-prevention programs in schools, and patterns of and interventions for intimate partner violence, including family violence and teen dating violence.
 
 
Work by scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women led to Relational-Cultural Theory, an understanding that has dramatically changed counseling and psychotherapy practices. Through training institutes, this work continues to be developed and implemented. Researchers committed to the prevention of depression in at-risk youth have undertaken studies to identify effective intervention programming for adolescents and families. Trainers and educators at the Centers develop curricula and facilitate training to promote social-emotional learning in elementary schools.
 
 
Scholars are the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research on economic implications of public policy; undertaken studies and audits; facilitated network building; and produced valuable resources for advocates, policy makers, and legal professionals in the U.S. and abroad. This work covers a broad range of issues related to the social and economic development of women, children, and persons with disabilities.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers undertake research initiatives that explore issues affecting work/life balance, including child care, work-leave policies, and gender roles. Research and action programs that address women’s leadership inform business practice and policy in the U.S. and within our global-network-partner communities. The Women’s Review of Books, a special publication of the Centers, puts women’s perspectives and voices at the center of literary contributions.

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Reports & Resources

For all publications, click here.


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Center News

THE GIRLS REPORT: What We Know & Need to Know About Growing Up Female

"Seven years ago the National Council for Research on Women and its member centers issued major reports on the status of girls in society, in schools, and in youth organizations in the United States. Since then, university researchers and popular writers have focussed attention on girls. The Girls Report is a fresh and timely look at every aspect of life for girls as we look toward the new millenium.

"If the reports in the early 1990s struck a chord of concern and a call to action, the tone of this report is optimism and activism. As we say at Girls Incorporated, girls are strong, smart and bold unless society puts barriers in their way. Lynn Phillips and the National Council staff have captured the strength, the energy, and the possibilities of girls on their way to becoming young women, while calling on the rest of us to be vigilant in supporting girls' high hopes and expectations for their own achievement."

Teaser: 

The Girls Report surveys current studies on girls, mapping theoretical debates, countering popular myths with recent research findings, and highlighting successful programs serving diverse populations. Chapters on education, health, self-esteem, violence, sexuality, and economic realities conclude with clear recommendations for action. A comprehensive bibliography offers resources to educators, researchers, policymakers, and all concerned with increasing opportunities for girls.

Cover Image: 
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