Violence

Violence against women and girls is a global pandemic that is a human rights and public health issue as well as a major cause of death and disability. The prevalence of violence transcends boundaries of race, class, culture, social status and religion. UNIFEM estimates that six out of every ten women will experience some form of physical or sexual abuse in her lifetime. Violations can occur at home, in the workplace or in public. Of rising concern is the systematic use of rape and sexual assault as weapons of armed conflict, terror and intimidation. One of the most common forms of violence against women is intimate partner violence. There are also variations in the types of violence against women which include but are not limited to: human trafficking, dating violence, sexual assault, emotional and verbal abuse, and customary practices such as female genital mutilation and so-called “honor killings” and other forms of femicide. Re:Gender and its network members are working along with international partners to raise awareness about efforts to reduce and eliminate the scourge of violence.

Day of Action: End Rape in War!

Today is the culmination of the Nobel Women's Inititative's conference to end sexual violence in conflict.  And how appropriate--they are ending it with a day of action!  Love it.  Here is their call to action:

Did you know that up 500,000 women were raped during the Rwandan genocide?
Did you know that over 64,000 women were raped in Sierra Leone?
Did you know that over 40,000 women were raped in Bosnia-Herzegovina?
Did you know that thousands of women are raped every day in Sudan and Democratic Republic of Congo?

Enough is enough.
Thursday is our international day of action against sexual violence in conflict.


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Nobel Women’s Initiative’s Conference on Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict

Today marks the beginning of the Nobel Women’s Initiative’s Conference on Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict. This three-day conference gathers over 100 women—including Nobel Laureates Jody Williams, Shirin Ebadi and Mairead Maguire—to discuss how to end sexual violence in conflict. According to this article on the conference’s approach,


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