Violence

Violence against women and girls is a global pandemic that is a human rights and public health issue as well as a major cause of death and disability. The prevalence of violence transcends boundaries of race, class, culture, social status and religion. UNIFEM estimates that six out of every ten women will experience some form of physical or sexual abuse in her lifetime. Violations can occur at home, in the workplace or in public. Of rising concern is the systematic use of rape and sexual assault as weapons of armed conflict, terror and intimidation. One of the most common forms of violence against women is intimate partner violence. There are also variations in the types of violence against women which include but are not limited to: human trafficking, dating violence, sexual assault, emotional and verbal abuse, and customary practices such as female genital mutilation and so-called “honor killings” and other forms of femicide. Re:Gender and its network members are working along with international partners to raise awareness about efforts to reduce and eliminate the scourge of violence.

“Understanding Disabled Women’s Experience with Abuse: Recasting Identities while Conducting Collaborative Anticipatory Research”

Date/Time: 
03/10/2010

Deborah Olson, assistant professor, Special Education

This project complements research being conducted by the Trauma Healing Project, which is examining how survivors experience trauma in order to understand the mechanisms of healing and to promote healing practices to service providers and the community.

The research will be expanded to include women with disabilities who are also survivors of trauma.

Location: 330 Hendricks Hall, Jane Grant Conference Room

Finding Face: A Film About Violence Against Women

Date/Time: 
03/04/2010

“‘Finding Face’ details the controversial case of Tat Marina, who was attacked with acid in Cambodia in 1999. At 16, Marina was a rising star in Phnom Penh’s karaoke music scene. She was coerced into an abusive relationship with Cambodia’s Undersecretary of State, Svay Sitha, and subsequently doused with a liter of nitric acid—allegedly by his wife—that disfigured her face. A decade later, despite the fact that there were multiple witnesses to the crime, no charges have ever been filed in the case” (from the Finding Face website).

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