Violence

Violence against women and girls is a global pandemic that is a human rights and public health issue as well as a major cause of death and disability. The prevalence of violence transcends boundaries of race, class, culture, social status and religion. UNIFEM estimates that six out of every ten women will experience some form of physical or sexual abuse in her lifetime. Violations can occur at home, in the workplace or in public. Of rising concern is the systematic use of rape and sexual assault as weapons of armed conflict, terror and intimidation. One of the most common forms of violence against women is intimate partner violence. There are also variations in the types of violence against women which include but are not limited to: human trafficking, dating violence, sexual assault, emotional and verbal abuse, and customary practices such as female genital mutilation and so-called “honor killings” and other forms of femicide. Re:Gender and its network members are working along with international partners to raise awareness about efforts to reduce and eliminate the scourge of violence.

The Feminist Majority Foundation

The name Feminist Majority Foundation is a consciousness-raiser, inspired by a Newsweek/Gallup public opinion poll that showed the majority of women (56%) in the United States self-identified as feminists. Most polls since then reveal that this majority continues with over two-thirds of young women self-identifying as feminists. Most men, especially young men, view themselves as supporters of the women's rights movement.

The Feminist Majority Foundation (FMF), which was founded in 1987, is a cutting edge organization dedicated to women's equality, reproductive health, and non-violence. In all spheres, FMF utilizes research and action to empower women economically, socially, and politically. Our organization believes that feminists - both women and men, girls and boys - are the majority, but this majority must be empowered.

Contact

1600 Wilson Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22209
Ph. (703) 522-2214
Fx. (703) 522-2219
http://www.feminist.org
femmaj@feminist.org


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Principal Staff

Eleanor Smeal, President
E-mail: esmeal@feminist.org

Katherine Spillar, Executive Vice President and Secretary
Ph. (310) 556-2500 x 102
E-mail: kspillar@feminist.org

Ina Coleman, Managing Director
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Abortion

Abortion is a necessity for millions of women worldwide, for their health, for their wellbeing, for their dreams of a better tomorrow. The reality is that a woman will seek an abortion—legal or otherwise—almost instinctively and in self defense. A woman will do this when an unwanted pregnancy presents an excessive strain on her or her family’s physical, emotional or economic resources. Throughout the ages, courageous women have made it their right and indeed their responsibility. In a civilized society we owe women the legal right to make their decision safely.

Birth Control

Contraceptives—birth control methods—prevent pregnancy. All women and men have a right to safe, effective, affordable and accessible contraception. Contraception reduces the number of unintended pregnancies and the need for abortion; it’s an essential and basic preventive health service globally.

The more contraceptive options a society has, along with easy access and the education to use them, the less a society has to depend upon abortion. In the United States, however, there are fewer contraceptive options than in other developed nations, access is far more complicated, and cost is prohibitive for far too many. In developed countries like The Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden—where effective contraceptive choices are easily accessible and inexpensive or free—women have lower abortion rates compared to the United States.

Campaign for Afghan Women and Girls

Campaign Objectives:
-Increase and monitor the provision of emergency and reconstruction assistance to women and girls
-Support Afghan women-led non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the Afghan Ministry for Women's Affairs, and the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission
-Increase security and safety for Afghan people, especially women and girls
-Promote women's rights, healthcare, and education

Mifepristone & Cancer Research

The Feminist Majority Foundation played a critical and decisive role in helping assure mifepristone's U.S. approval for safe and effective early medical abortion. In addition to fighting to expand women's safe abortion option, for more than a decade, the FMF has also been advocating for non-abortion clinical trials using mifepristone to treat cancers and other life-threatening conditions that solely or disproportionately affect women.

Campus Activism

The Feminist Majority Foundation (FMF) started the Campus Program to inform young feminists about the very real threats to abortion access, women’s rights, affirmative action, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights posed by right-wing extremists. FMF works with students on college campuses to effect change at the grassroots, national, and global levels. The Campus Program is built upon FMF’s philosophy that the most effective activism is informed activism, or study to action. Our program provides progressive students with opportunities to learn about timely feminist issues, develop their leadership and organizing skills, and connect with the larger pro-choice and feminist movements

Education Equality

Title IX is most well-known for increasing women's participation in sports. In 1971, only 294,015 girls participated in high school athletics. According to the U.S. Department of Education, today, over 2.7 million girls participate in high school athletics, an 847 percent increase. However, males are still the majority of high school and college athletes.

Girls Learn International

Girls Learn International (GLI) educates and energizes U.S. students in the global movement for girls’ access to education. GLI pairs Chapters in U.S. middle schools and high schools with Partner Schools in countries where girls still lag behind boys in access to education and where girls are far less likely than boys to stay in school past the primary grades. The GLI Program supports the empowerment of U.S. students as they discover that through their own creative initiatives, dedication, and passionate leadership, they can create real solutions that address the obstacles facing girls and women here around the world. Student-to-student, and student-to-parent, GLI is building a movement of informed advocates for universal girls’ education and a new generation of leaders and activists for social change.

Global Women's Rights

The Feminist Majority Foundation is committed to empowering women and girls around the world. Join us as we advocate for Afghan women and girls, women in Iran, increased funding for global sexual reproductive health and rights, the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), known as The Women's Treaty, and the worldwide elimination of violence against women.

Ms. Magazine

Ms. was the first U.S. magazine to feature prominent American women demanding the repeal of laws that criminalized abortion, the first to explain and advocate for the ERA, to rate presidential candidates on women's issues, to put domestic violence and sexual harassment on the cover of a women's magazine, to feature feminist protest of pornography, to commission and feature a national study on date rape, and to blow the whistle on the undue influence of advertising on magazine journalism.

National Cetner for Women and Policing

A program of the Feminist Majority Foundation, the National Center for Women & Policing (NCWP), promotes increasing the numbers of women at all ranks of law enforcement as a strategy to improve police response to violence against women, reduce police brutality and excessive force, and strengthen community policing reforms.

National Clinic Access Project

The National Clinic Access Project (NCAP) assists independent clinics and physicians as well as affiliated clinics, both non-profit clinics as well as for-profit. NCAP began as the National Clinic Defense Project in 1989 by mobilizing 10,000 pro-choice volunteers in response to Operation Rescue's threat to turn Los Angeles into the first "abortion-free city."

Rock for Choice

Rock for Choice was founded by L7 in the fall of 1991 to mobilize the music community to protect abortion rights and women's health clinics. After meeting with the Feminist Majority, which heads the largest clinic access Project in the country, L7 organized the first Rock for Choice concert at the Palace in Los Angeles on October 21, 1991. This historic concert featured Nirvana, Hole and Sister Double Happiness.

Feminists Against Sweatshops

Women make up 90 percent of sweatshop laborers. The majority of these women are between the ages of 15 and 22. Companies that use sweatshop labor to increase their own profit margins are taking advantage of predominantly young women.

Violence Against Women

Change the FBI definition of rape. Find out how you can encourage your community leaders to test the backlog of rape evidence kits. Watch a video about rape kits and order the action toolkit.


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Reports & Resources

 
The Feminist Chronicles,written by Toni Carabillo, Judith Meuli, and June Bundy Csida, provides the most thorough history to date of the women's movement and the advancements women have made in the U.S. from 1953 to 1993.
 
 
This Teacher's Guide, provided on FM's website in 1995, gives a sample approach to teaching women's history, including topic breakdowns and bibliography.
 
 
Get comprehensive data on women and policing, from gender-balance statistics in nationwide police departments to stats on women in leadership positions within law enforcement.
 
 
Including comprehensive statistics and analysis on clinic violence nationwide, the Annual Clinic Violence survey is the foremost source on threats and violence against reproductive health clinics, and law enforcement response.
 
 
In order to further clinics’ and communities’ ability to provide safe abortion access, the Feminist Majority Foundation and NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund have updated this booklet, first published in 1996.
 

Overview of research providing compelling evidence that increasing the number of female officers improves police response to violence against women and reduces police use of excessive force.
 
 
The creation of this 2007 Handbook has been a major activity of General Handbook Editor, Dr. Sue Klein, Director of the Feminist Majority Foundation Education Equity Program. This Handbook is especially valuable to the increased numbers of researchers, educators and educational activists interested in gender equity and their equity allies at all educational levels. In addition to schools of education, it is a valuable reference book for journalists, women's and gender studies faculty and students, and for professional organizations concerned with educational equity
 
 
Feminist Majority Foundation research confirmed widespread non-compliance with Title IX and the U.S. Constitution protections against sex discrimination in all but four states which instituted deliberate single-sex education in over 1,000 public K-12 schools during 2007-10. Key recommendations include rescinding the 2006 ED Title IX regulations which weakened safeguards against sex discriminatory sex segregation and empowering Title IX coordinators to identify and help stop this increased sex discrimination.
 
 
Feminist Majority's in-depth analysis of the gender gap and how it affected the controversial 2000 presidential election, as well as key races and feminist victories in Congress and statewide elections.
 
 
A variety of archived chats featuring well-known feminist leaders, as well as lesser-known women doing amazing work. Chat topics include emergency contraception, AIDS, clinic violence, and the courts.
 
 
FMF led the successful 12-year campaign for the approval of mifepristone in the United States. Learn about the campaign, the history of the struggle for mifepristone access, and current campaigns to ensure broad access to this early abortion pill.
 
Empowering Women Reports, 1995

Sports

Philanthropy

Business

Medicine


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Center News

Women's Resource Center

The Women's Resource Center is an integral part of Washington State University's commitment to equity and diversity. The Center works to promote a safe and supportive climate that enables women to engage as full and active participants within the university community. The Women's Resource Center helps transform the educational environment into a more inclusive and progressive institution by assisting, supporting, and mentoring women at Washington State University.

The Women's Resource Center develops programs to celebrate women's diversity and contributions, while actively confronting societal challenges and obstacles through activism and working for change. Our programs address gender, race, class, and their intersections, recognizing the relevance of these inter-related social issues. Offering resources and educational programs to members of our university, we engage the larger constituencies to act as change agents for a more diverse and inclusive educational system.

Contact


Pullman, WA 99164-4005
Ph. (509) 335-6849
Fx. (509) 335-4377
http://www.women.wsu.edu/
kim_barrett@wsu.edu


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Principal Staff

Turea Erwin, Director & NEW Leadership Inland Northwest Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-8200
E-mail: turea_erwin@wsu.edu

Kim Barrett, Program Support Specialist
Ph. (509) 335-4386
E-mail: kim_barrett@wsu.edu

Stephanie Russell, YWCA of WSU Program Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-2572
E-mail: stephanie.russell@email.wsu.edu

Joseph Pacific, Program Coordinator-Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services
Ph. (509) 335-1856
E-mail: jpacific@wsu.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
A core pillar of the Women's Resource Center, Women's Transit strives to extend the values of inspiration, encouragement, and empowerment to all students at Washignton State University. The primary goal of this program is to act as a resource to reduce the incidents of sexual assault in the community. Students who feel safe getting to and from classes, work, and social events are far more likely to succeed than students who are scared to simply live their lives while at school. We also believe that giving back to the community is incredibly important to a well-rounded education. We give nearly all students who apply the opportunity to learn valuable skills in communication, crisis management, and sexual assault risk reduction.
 
 
The Coalition for Women Students (CWS) was formed in 1912 as the Association for Women Students (AWS) by the Washington State College women students. The term “coalition” was adopted in the fall of 1993 to express a common vision for the student groups involved. A coalition is comprised of distinct groups or persons in alliance for joint action. In this case the joint action is heightening awareness of issues pertaining to women locally and globally.
 
 
APAW is committed to coordinating student programs that heighten awareness of Pacific and Asian women’s issues. APAW’s programs empower community and individual pride, celebrate our rich cultures, and highlight our diverse contributions. The Association of Pacific and Asian Women fosters leadership development opportunities for women by bringing ideas and vision into action on an individual and group level. Women’s leadership roles are supported and fostered within our organization.
 
 
The Black Women's Caucus (BWC) serves as a support system for African American Women on the WSU campus. Its main focus is to serve as an instrument through which African American women are able to express their concerns about issues they face globally as well as locally. BWC is also concerned with educating other students about the pioneering roles and major contributions of African American women in this society. Membership is open to all students who share the concerns of Black Women's Caucus.
 
 
Mujeres Unidas represents the interests and issues of Chicanas/Latinas at WSU and coordinates activities and opportunities of interest to multicultural women students. Members contribute to community projects and provide peer support for Chicanas and Latinas. In addition, MU provides women with the opportunity to gain leadership training and experience.
 
 
The purpose of the Native American Women's Association (NAWA) is to address the needs and concerns of Native American people, with a special emphasis on issues that affect Native American women. NAWA encourages women of color to assume leadership roles on campus and become actively involved in the community.
 
 
The YWCA of WSU is a member association of the YWCA of the USA. We have been part of the WSU community since 1895 and are proud to be part of this women's membership movement.

 


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Reports & Resources

Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
Whether you are looking to give two hours or fourty hours of your time this semester, Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services wants to bring you on as part of the team. No prior experience in ANYTHING is necessary. We will train everyone is driving, dispatching, and walking. You don't even need a driver license (we obviously won't place you as a driver, but there are many other things that you can do)!

 


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Altagracia Dilone Levat

Founded in 1970 as NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund, Legal Momentum is the nation's oldest legal advocacy organization dedicated to advancing the rights of women and girls. Legal Momentum is a leader in establishing litigation and public policy strategies to secure equality and justice for women. Its groundbreaking work on behalf of women and girls is currently focused on freedom from violence against women, equal work and equal pay, the health of women and girls, strong families, and strong communities. Its ambitious and wide-ranging legal program is known for its cutting-edge legal theories and as a source of expert assistance to other women's rights attorneys and organizations.

Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Center News

Impact of War and Militarization on Women

May 24, 2009 posted by admin

Last year’s UN Security Council Resolution 1820 recognized sexual violence as a war crime. Its passage is often cited as a milestone.  Given so many conflicts around the globe, however, what was this resolution’s real impact? If your heart drops every time you think about the continuing rape in the Congo, you are not alone! For NCRW’s upcoming Annual Conference we have assembled a special panel featuring experts on women, war and security. 


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LGBT Activism: Past, Present, Future

May 13, 2009 posted by admin

With the legalization of same-sex marriage spreading like wildfire in the Northeast  and exciting progress on hate crime protections (legislation passed the House AND Angie Zapata got justice),  what better time to discuss the past, present, and future of LGBT activism? 


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FAST FACT: For Young Black Girls in NYC, Safety is of Prime Concern

April 24, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird 60% of young black girls in New York City surveyed by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research indicated they worry about their personal safety.  89% attributed their concern to frequent fights at school. Despite this and other harsh realities, the study reveals the strength and resilience girls embody.  Produced by IWPR and The Black Women for Black Girls Giving Circle, Black Girls in New York City: Untold Strength and Resilience documents the lives of girls living in New York City.  The report discusses the daily challenges girls face as well as their modes of survival.  To read the whole report, click here.


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The Impact of the Global Recession

April 17, 2009 posted by Shyama Venkateswar The Gender Policy Group at Columbia University’s School for International and Public Affairs organized a lively panel discussion on “Gender, Jobs and This Recession” on Monday, April 13, 2009. I was invited to speak on the panel along with Sylvia Ann Hewlett, Melinda Wolfe, Subha Barry and Heidi Brown. Here are the main points that I addressed: The current economic crisis is unprecedented in terms of its global reach and impact; here’s what the current economic crisis looks like within the United States.

  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that current unemployment stands at 13.2 million.
  • 5.1 million jobs have been lost since December 2007.
  • The subprime lending crisis has particularly hit hard women and people of color because of predatory lending practices. NCRW’s research has shown that African American and Latina women borrowers are most likely to receive sub-prime loans at every income level. Women are 32% more likely than men to receive subprime mortgages.
  • In the financial sector, men’s unemployment in Feb was 6.9% while for women it was 6.6%
  • There have been increased reports of women who were secondary breadwinners in their households having to now become primary wage earner because of layoffs.

At the international level, the picture remains pretty grim as well:


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Keeping Women on the Economic Agenda

Last night I attended a dynamic panel hosted by Legal Momentum on Women’s Economic Equality: The Next Frontier in Women’s Rights.  The brilliant panelists duked it out, discussing the current economic situation, its impact on women, and in what directions we should be heading. 


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FAST FACT: LGBT Students of Color Face Alarming Rates of Harassment and Violence in School

February 28, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network reported the experiences of 2,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) middle and high school students of color who were African American or Black, Latino/a, Asian or Pacific Islander, Native American, and multiracial as part of their National School Climate Survey.  The report found that


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