Violence

Violence against women and girls is a global pandemic that is a human rights and public health issue as well as a major cause of death and disability. The prevalence of violence transcends boundaries of race, class, culture, social status and religion. UNIFEM estimates that six out of every ten women will experience some form of physical or sexual abuse in her lifetime. Violations can occur at home, in the workplace or in public. Of rising concern is the systematic use of rape and sexual assault as weapons of armed conflict, terror and intimidation. One of the most common forms of violence against women is intimate partner violence. There are also variations in the types of violence against women which include but are not limited to: human trafficking, dating violence, sexual assault, emotional and verbal abuse, and customary practices such as female genital mutilation and so-called “honor killings” and other forms of femicide. Re:Gender and its network members are working along with international partners to raise awareness about efforts to reduce and eliminate the scourge of violence.

Child Marriage

Child marriage most often occurs in poor, rural communities. In many regions, parents arrange their daughter’s marriage unbeknownst to the girl. That can mean that one day, she may be at home playing with her siblings, and the next, she’s married off and sent to live in another village with her husband and his family – strangers, essentially. She is pulled out of school. She is separated from her peers. And once married, she is more likely to be a victim of domestic violence and suffer health complications associated with early sexual activity and childbearing.

ICRW’s early research provided a deeper understanding of the scope, causes and consequences of child marriage. Now, our experts are focused on how to prevent – and ultimately end – the practice. 

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/what-we-do/adolescents/child-marriage

Legal Aid is a Lifeline

The National Federation of Women's Institutes (UK) launches a report into violence against women and legal aid to coincide with the report stage of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill (31 October). Throughout the report, victims of domestic violence reiterate how access to legal aid secured their safety and protection in often life-threatening circumstances.

URL: 
http://www.thewi.org.uk/standard.aspx?id=23519

Review of Combat Stress in Women Veterans Receiving VA Health Care and Disability Benefits

As directed by the Conference Report to Accompany the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-117), we conducted a review to assess the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) capacity to address combat stress in women veterans. We assessed women veterans use of VA health care for traumatic brain injury (TBI), post­ traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other mental health conditions, and whether the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) properly adjudicated women veterans’ disability claims for these conditions.
URL: 
http://www.va.gov/oig/52/reports/2011/VAOIG-10-01640-45.pdf
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