Violence Against Women, Global

CEDAW FORUM: There’s No Time Like the Present

The United States remains one of only seven countries that have not ratified CEDAW (the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women).  CEDAW is an international agreement on basic human rights for women and the most broadly endorsed human rights treaty within the United Nations, having been ratified by over 90% of UN member states. CEDAW outlines human rights such as the right to live free from violence, the ability to go to school, and access to the political system.


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CEDAW FORUM: The U.S. Needs a Human Rights Treaty for Women Domestically

By Margot Baruch* 

Before CEDAW there was no international legal mechanism in place that called on states to assess gender inequalities in their country. The Convention draws attention to 30 articles that deal with discrimination on the basis of being a woman. The treaty is divided into six parts - all related to ensuring that women are able to enjoy their “fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,” as stated in the preamble of the UDHR [Universal Declaration of Human Rights].  


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CEDAW FORUM: The Unfinished Business of Ratification

By Linda Tarr-Whelan*

NCRW asked leading research and policy expert Linda Tarr-Whelan to weigh in on the status of CEDAW. In addition to her responses, below is an excerpt from a previously published commentary from Linda featured on Women’s eNEws and The Huffington Post.

On Dec. 18, 1979, the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, or CEDAW, making it a watershed day for women around the globe.

In those heady days, I was deputy assistant to President Jimmy Carter for women's concerns. We expected speedy action after he sent the treaty to the Senate.


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CEDAW Forum: Time to Make History With CEDAW

By Don Kraus*

The bumper sticker on my wife’s car reads, “Well-behaved women seldom make history!” I believe proponents of CEDAW, the Women’s Treaty, have been minding their manners a bit too much. CEDAW is the most important international mechanism for women’s equality, and provides a universal standard for women’s human rights. The treaty is a basic framework for ending violence against women, ensuring girls access to education, and promoting economic opportunity and political participation for women.


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Enough talk - let's walk the walk

By Chloe Angyal*

As ethnic tension boils over into violence in Kyrgyzstan this week, rumors have begun to surface on the ground that amid the rioting, shooting and chaos, Kyrgyz women are being raped. Whether or not the rumor is true, the situation is all too familiar. When violence breaks out, women and girls, already vulnerable, are often among the first casualties, and the violence is often systematic, designed to demoralize their communities.


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“Violence Unmasked: The Men Behind the Abuse” Panel Sponsored by NOW-NYC

By Tunisia L. Riley*

In light of public figures connected to domestic violence scandals in New York like White Plains Mayor, 2010 Puerto Rican Day Parade Godfather Osvaldo Rios, and Governor Patterson’s aide , the New York City chapter of the National Organization of Women (NOW-NYC) brought together a panel discussion to address the men behind domestic abuse.


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Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is pervasive throughout the world, as both a public health and human rights issue. It “reflects and reinforces inequities between men and women and compromises the health, dignity, security and autonomy of its victims,” according to the UN Population Fund. Ending gender based violence must be a priority on the international human rights agenda. Violence against women and girls was a central theme of our annual conference 2010 (June 11-12 at Hunter College) Strategic Imperatives for Ending Violence against Women: Linkages to Education, Economic Security and Health, co-presented with the U.S. National Committee for UNIFEM. Click here for details. Get the latest facts, figures, and policy perspectives on our Big Five program page.
 

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