Violence Against Women, Global

NCRW Fact Sheet: Ending Violence Against Women--An Imperative for a Healthy Nation

Ending violence against women should become a national imperative. Policies and laws need to be strengthened both at the national and state levels to protect women, girls, LGBT people, and other marginalized groups. Such measures are key to national security and building a thriving, healthy society.

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NCRW Fact Sheet: Women and Immigrant Rights

Unlike immigrant men, immigrant women are often caught in a double bind and suffer abuse and violence both crossing the borders and on the job. They also tend to receive inadequate and low wages, have higher family caretaking demands and reproductive health care needs.

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NCRW Fact Sheet: The International Violence Against Women Act

I-VAWA would apply the force of U.S. diplomacy and provide $1 billion over five years to institute measures to prevent the abuse and exploitation that affects so many women worldwide.

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International Center for Research on Women

ICRW's mission is to empower women, advance gender equality and fight poverty in the developing world. To accomplish this, ICRW works with partners to conduct empirical research, build capacity and advocate for evidence-based, practical ways to change policies and programs.

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1120 20th St. N.W.
Washington, DC 20036
Ph. (202) 797-0007
Fx. (202) 797-0020
http://www.icrw.org
info@icrw.org


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Principal Staff

Sarah Degnan Kambou, President

Lyric Thompson, Special Assistant to the President/Policy Advocate

Kristin Fack, Administrative Assistant
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Adolescents

ICRW has been examining the lives of adolescents – especially girls – for more than two decades. Our work focuses on improving their well-being and identifying ways to change deeply entrenched traditional practices that prevent girls and young women from reaching their full potential. We believe that making the abilities, attitudes and options of adolescent girls and boys more equitable is one of the most effective ways to empower women. And our research shows that all aspects of young people’s lives – school, relationships, work, health and marriage – must be addressed in order to bring about lasting social change. Adolescent programs and policies require working with not only girls, but boys, parents, teachers, community members, leaders, schools and employers, too.
 
 
ICRW has been examining for more than 30 years how disparities between women and men affect agricultural productivity and food security. Our research helps development organizations, policymakers and others find practical ways to enhance women’s roles in agricultural production and trade, thereby improving their incomes and livelihoods.

ICRW analyzes the differences between the responsibilities, limitations and interests of male and female farmers to design strategies that provide services, training and incomes. Our findings and recommendations help identify sound approaches that ensure efforts reach women as well as men. Ultimately, we aim to help farmers become competitive participants in the agricultural marketplace and reap the financial benefits.
 
 
Economic development efforts to combat poverty can only succeed if women are part of the solution. Doing so yields a double dividend: When women are economically empowered, they raise healthier, better educated families. Their countries are more economically prosperous because of it, too.

Since our founding more than 30 years ago, ICRW's work has expanded understanding of women's economic contributions as well as the hurdles that prevent them from being successful. Our efforts focus on how gender affects economic development efforts related to assets and property rights as well as employment, enterprise development and financial services.
 
We strive to increase women's ownership, use and control of assets and property. We want to empower women as economic agents and better their ability to access markets on competitive and equitable terms. And with our partners, ICRW aims to integrate gender perspectives into program and institution activities. We believe such an approach improves the likelihood that efforts to strengthen women economically are successful.
 
 
ICRW was among the first organizations in the early 1990s to call attention to how gender inequality fueled the transmission of HIV and AIDS among women. Today, ICRW continues to push the AIDS agenda forward. As the global response moves from a focus on crisis management into a sustained, long-term strategy, our work centers around how HIV programs and policies can better serve the needs of women and girls. We work with partners to design, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of programs that strive to reduce women's social and biological vulnerability to HIV. We also aim to weave these programs into existing family planning, reproductive and maternal health services. Ultimately, we strive to influence national policies by guiding governments and others on how to address the role that gender norms play in the prevention, support and treatment of HIV.
 
 
ICRW strives to demonstrate that improved sexual and reproductive health outcomes are pre-conditions for achieving gender equality, empowering women and reducing global poverty. ICRW’s research in this area aims to build a sound evidence base to inform programs and policies by defining the fundamental connections between gender, reproductive health and development, highlighting the importance of adolescent transitions to adulthood, analyzing means for facilitating women’s access to safe and effective reproductive control options, and undertaking rigorous evaluations to demonstrate what works.
 
Our approach examines how gender equality is both a determinant and a consequence of demographic change. For example, our current research suggests that as fertility rates decline in developing countries, women gain increased access to higher education and formal employment opportunities. This in turn can facilitate more transformative shifts in gender relations. Findings such as these bolster the policy directive that advancing women’s and girls’ reproductive health creates conditions that improve the quality of life for individuals, families, communities and nations.
 
 
ICRW employs a multifaceted approach to reducing violence against women. We conduct empirical research to better understand the incidence of violence, costs associated with it and factors that lead to it. We also are building evidence on interventions designed to prevent violence against women, particularly comprehensive approaches that include economically empowering women, involving boys and men, protecting survivors of violence and rehabilitating men who are abusive. ICRW is examining the policy dimensions of violence prevention by evaluating the impact of and challenges to existing legislation and using our findings to advocate for stronger, more effective laws. Finally, ICRW participates in strategic regional and global networks that work to strengthen civil society and advance the field of preventing violence against women.

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Wellesley Centers for Women

At the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), Wellesley College, we believe that disciplined, relevant research and theory paired with innovative training and action programs are key building blocks for social progress.
 
Since 1974, WCW has conducted interdisciplinary studies on issues such as: gender equity in education, sexual harassment in schools, child care, adolescent development, gender violence, and women’s leadership—studies that have influenced private practices and public policy.
 
WCW staff members provide professional development for educators, child caregivers, and youth workers that encourage children’s social-emotional development and enhance learning environments and safety.
 
Other WCW scholars have dedicated themselves to the prevention of psychological problems, the enhancement of psychological well-being, and the search for a more comprehensive understanding of human deve

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106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481-8203
Ph. 781-283-2500
Fx. 781-283-2504
http://www.wcwonline.org
newswcw@wellesley.edu


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Child and Adolescent Development

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research studies and evaluations on issues related to child and adolescent development, including issues around race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and identity; the effects of early child care; the value of physical activity; preventing depression; examining unique family dynamics; and exploring sexuality and evaluating sex-education programming.

Childcare

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have studied the ability of public schools to prepare young children for lifelong learning and have shaped local, state, and federal policies. Our groundbreaking research, policy development, and training programs set the standards for out-of-school time, and continue to inform the field in new areas, including physical activity programming.

 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) have conducted research on a range of educational issues, including quality early education; equitable opportunities in STEM fields and literacy; and bullying prevention and sex-education programming. Scholars and trainers from WCW have also developed curricula and facilitated programs that promote equity and diversity and social-emotional learning in educational settings. Our research has raised public consciousness about serious education issues and has informed public policy.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted numerous research studies on issues related to gender violence, including bullying- and sexual harassment-prevention programs in schools, and patterns of and interventions for intimate partner violence, including family violence and teen dating violence.
 
 
Work by scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women led to Relational-Cultural Theory, an understanding that has dramatically changed counseling and psychotherapy practices. Through training institutes, this work continues to be developed and implemented. Researchers committed to the prevention of depression in at-risk youth have undertaken studies to identify effective intervention programming for adolescents and families. Trainers and educators at the Centers develop curricula and facilitate training to promote social-emotional learning in elementary schools.
 
 
Scholars are the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research on economic implications of public policy; undertaken studies and audits; facilitated network building; and produced valuable resources for advocates, policy makers, and legal professionals in the U.S. and abroad. This work covers a broad range of issues related to the social and economic development of women, children, and persons with disabilities.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers undertake research initiatives that explore issues affecting work/life balance, including child care, work-leave policies, and gender roles. Research and action programs that address women’s leadership inform business practice and policy in the U.S. and within our global-network-partner communities. The Women’s Review of Books, a special publication of the Centers, puts women’s perspectives and voices at the center of literary contributions.

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