Domestic and Workplace Violence

Iraqi Refugees: Women’s Rights and Security Critical to Returns

The Iraqi refugee crisis is far from over and recent violence is creating further displacement. Iraqi women will resist returning home, even if conditions improve in Iraq, if there is no focus on securing their rights as women and assuring their personal security and their families’ well being.

URL: 
http://www.refugeesinternational.org/policy/field-report/iraqi-refugees-womens-rights-and-security-critical-returns

NCRW Fact Sheet: Ending Violence Against Women--An Imperative for a Healthy Nation

Ending violence against women should become a national imperative. Policies and laws need to be strengthened both at the national and state levels to protect women, girls, LGBT people, and other marginalized groups. Such measures are key to national security and building a thriving, healthy society.

Attachment: 

NCRW Fact Sheet: Under the Radar--Immigrant Women and Violence

Violence against immigrant women is nearly impossible to estimate with any precision. Immigration status, cultural and language barriers, and economic hardship intersect and often prevent women who experience violence from coming forward. The two most common forms of abuse experienced by immigrant women are intimate partner violence and exploitative work conditions.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Women and Immigrant Rights

Unlike immigrant men, immigrant women are often caught in a double bind and suffer abuse and violence both crossing the borders and on the job. They also tend to receive inadequate and low wages, have higher family caretaking demands and reproductive health care needs.

Attachment: 

NCRW Policy Brief: Violence

Ending violence against women needs to become a national priority. A safe society for women and girls is a prerequisite to enable them to lead productive and successful lives.

Attachment: 

NCRW Fact Sheet: Violence Against Women Act

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is the most comprehensive federal legislation ever enacted to protect women, children, and families from violence. Programs under the act are administered through the Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women.

Attachment: 

Center for the Education of Women

The University of Michigan Center for the Education of Women (CEW) advances the personal, educational, career, professional and leadership potential of women. The services, programs, applied research, and action initiatives conducted by CEW promote inclusiveness and equity within the University, across the state and throughout the nation.

Founded in 1964, the Center for the Education of Women, within the University of Michigan, was one of the nation's first comprehensive, university-based centers focused on women.  Designed to serve the needs of women students as well as women returning to school or work, CEW (then known as the Center for the Continuing Education of Women) was founded with a three part mission of service, advocacy, and research. CEW maintains that mission today, serving University students, staff and faculty, community members, women and men, facing educational, employment or other life issues.

Contact

330 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2274
Ph. (734) 764-6005
Fx. (734) 998-6203
http://www.cew.umich.edu
cew.mail@umich.edu
contactcew@umich.edu

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Principal Staff

Gloria Thomas, Executive Director
Ph. (734) 764-7640
E-mail: gthomas@umich.edu

Wanlanda Ault, Fianance Assistant

Kristina Bee, Development and Scholarship Assistant

Jacqueline Bowman, Senior Counselor and Program Specialist

Eilisha Dermont, Communications Manager
Ph. (734) 764-6277
E-mail: edermont@umich.edu

Kirsten Elling, Associate Director for Counseling, Programs and Services

Connie Hansen, Assistant to the Director
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

RESEARCH

Center researchers are currently analyzing the results of the Faculty Work-Life Study, a joint project of the Center for the Education of Women and the UM Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. The survey of UM faculty included questions about climate, workload, sources of satisfaction and stress, and incorporate AAUDI questions for comparison to similar institutions.  This project also provides comparison to the 1998 FWLS.

Contingent Faculty in a Tenure Track World - CEW researchers held focus groups with full- and part-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty at twelve research universities across the country. In total, we conducted 24 ninety-minute focus groups with a total of 343 full- and part-time NTT faculty. A report of the project is available  and a video based on the project explores the responses of focus group members. The project was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The National Clearinghouse on Academic Worklife  (www.academicworklife.org) combines into a single website information resources and community discussions to support those who study or participate in academic work.  Up to date articles and policy examples are available on topics ranging from family-friendly benefits, tenure attainment, and faculty satisfaction to policy development, productivity, and demographics.  An email newsletter is also available free to subscribers. This clearinghouse was developed  through a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Dual Career Ladder Project, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, resulted in several publications based on the findings of our institutional survey of U.S. institutions of higher education.  highlighting the numbers, working conditions and perceived contributions of non tenure track faculty.  These are available on the CEW website.

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

CEW’s Advanced Leadership Program offers middle management University of Michigan staff, recommended by their supervisors, an eight-month skill development workshop series and accompanying change management project.  This program has been offered annually for nearly 10 years. 

 

Focus on Leadership, addresses the need for leadership development and training for staff not yet in key middle-management positions or not yet ready for the more extensive Advanced Leadership Program.  Offered to approximately 30 individuals annually, this program offers participants an introduction to leadership concepts while it assists participants in developing an identity as a potential leader.

 

Emerging Leaders Iniative  CEW is currently developing an innovative nine-month program for emerging leaders (those with less than 6 years in their career fields) over the course of two years. The program will focus on women from a specific Michigan urban region, combining those from the private and the non-profit sectors.  The program combines in-person sessions, career coaching by senior leaders, and ongoing support and learning using web 2.0 tools including social media and online learning. 

PROGRAMS

CEW offers about 50 programs each term, covering topics such as careers, career change and job searching, work-life balance, leadership development, and focused programs for graduate students and post-docs.  In addition, CEW brings special events and speakers to the campus and community. 

In addition, CEW leads three support networks for University of Michigan women: Women of Color in the Academy Project and Junior Women Faculty Network for women faculty and the Women of Color Task Force for women staff.  These networks offer support, mentoring, and learning opportunities for participants.  The Task Force delivers a campus-wide career conference annually, with about 550 participants. 

CEW provides free counseling to students, faculty and staff of the University as well as to women and men in the community.  Each year over 1,000 adults are seen by CEW’s professional counselors.


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Reports & Resources

2012
 
"Factors Contributing to Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction among Non-Tenure-Track Faculty" By Jean Waltman, Inger Bergom, Carol Hollenshead, Jeanne Miller, and Louise August. The Journal of Higher Education, May/June 2012 83:3.  
 
Success for Nontraditional Students at Elite Institution, On Campus with Women v.40, no 3. By Gloria D. Thomas and Carol Hollenshead
 
2010
 
 
2009
 
 
"Satisfaction and Discontent: Voices of Non-Tenure-Track Faculty," By Inger Bergom and Jean Waltman. In On Campus With Women, vol 37, #3, 2009.
 
2008
 
Women of Color Faculty at the University of Michigan: Recruitment, Retention, and Campus Climate. Aimee Cox, PhD, Research Investigator Center for the Education of Women, CEW Jean Campbell Research Scholar (Executive Summary)
 
 
 
Developing a Transparent Tenure Process (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
Enabling Junior Faculty Success (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
2007
 

Post-Apartheid South Africa: Creating Critically Leaderful Schools that Make a Difference, 
Juliet Perumal, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) and CEW Visting Scholar, 2007.

How American Men's Participation in Housework and Child-care Affects Wives' Careers. 
Renge Jibu, CEW Visiting Scholar

 
 
 
2006
Attrition Among Female Tenure-Track Faculty, paper presented at AIR, May 18, 2006, Louise August
 
A Commitment to Volunteerism. Louise August, Carol Hollenshead and Sally Schmall
 

The Gender Impact of the Proposed Michigan Civil Rights Initiative: Research Brief. 
Susan Kaufmann

 

It Isn't Over: The Continuing Under-Representation of Female Faculty, paper presented at AIR, 
May 18, 2006, Louise August.

 
Non Tenure Track Faculty: The Landscape at U.S. Institutions of Higher Education: Full Report. Includes the Executive Summary as well as tables and charts reporting analyses of the survey data.
 
 
 
 
 
 
2005
 
 
 
 

Tenure Clock, Modified Duties, and Sick Leave Policies: Creating 'A Network of Support and Understanding' for University of Michigan Faculty Women During Pregnancy and Childbirth, 
Jean Waltman and Louise August

"Gender, Family, and Flexibility in Academia" Jeanne E. Miller and Carol Hollenshead in ChangeNovember/December 2005, pp.58-62
 
2004
 
"Developing and Implementing Work – Family Policies for Faculty," Beth Sullivan, Carol Hollenshead and Gilia Smith in Academe: Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors. November-December 2004.
 
2003
 
The 2003 Michigan Women's Leadership Index: Executive Summary, produced jointly by CEW and the Detroit Women's Economic Club.
 
Women at the University of Michigan: A Statistical Report on the Status of Women Students, Staff and Faculty on the Ann Arbor Campus, compiled by staff from CEW, Human Resource Records and Information Services, and the Office of Budget and Planning. (Replaced by 2010 Report)
 
2002
 
 
Sexing the Single Girl. Deborah Siegel, CEW Visiting Scholar
 
“Work/family policies in higher education: Survey data and case studies of policy implementation" by Carol S. Hollenshead, Beth Sullivan, Gilia C. Smith, Louise August, and Susan Hamilton is a chapter of The Challenge of Balancing Faculty Careers and Family Work, New Directions in Higher Education no. 130, 2005, 41-65.
 
2001
 
 
2000
 
 
Women and Higher Education 2000: Michigan: a "Smart State" for Women? Susan Kaufmann, Sally Sharp, Jeanne E. Miller, and Jean Waltman

Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity­ (Findings) A joint report from CEW, Catalyst, and the University of Michigan Business School 
Women and the MBA. The full report is available through Catalyst.

Before 2000
 
Former Women Faculty: Reasons for Leaving One Research University. Stacy A. Wenzel and Carol Hollenshead 1998

The Michigan Faculty Work-Life Study 1999. Executive SummaryComplete Report
.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholar Program

The Visiting Scholar Program is an opportunity for scholars to pursue research projects relevant to women using the vast resources available through the Center for the Education of Women (CEW) and the University of Michigan. Scholars must hold a Ph.D. or equivalent degree. A scholar's stay at the Center can range from one to twelve months, as appropriate to the scholar's research needs. Visiting Scholars prepare a working paper based upon their research, which is published as part of the Center's series of occasional papers.

Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship

The Center for the Education of Women announces the Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship with a grant of up to $3,200. The fund will support research by a graduate student from the Islamic World or Africa matriculating in the Rackham Graduate School.


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Ms. Foundation for Women

Forty years ago, four visionary women established the Ms. Foundation for Women to elevate women's voices and create positive change. Today, we're a dynamic and powerful entity that is leading the charge on women's issues nationwide.
 
We start with the knowledge that our fight is not yet over. It's true that women have come a long way since the 1970s, but for every woman who has reached the "top" (and who still face discrimination, by the way), there are millions of women struggling to earn a living wage, gain access to basic health care, secure affordable child care and participate in the opportunities that should be available to every person in the U.S.
 
At the Ms. Foundation, we work to bring attention to the real challenges facing women, especially women of color and low-income women, living in poverty, working paycheck to paycheck or both.

Contact

12 MetroTech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Ph. 212/742-2300
Fx. 212/742-1653
http://forwomen.org/
info@ms.foundation.org


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Principal Staff

Anika Rahman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Deborah Jacobs, Vice President, Advocacy and Policy

Alesia Soltanpanah, Vice President, Development
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
It's ridiculous and alarming that birth control and basic health services are still "controversial." We're leading the fight to protect women's reproductive rights, including abortion, access to contraception and health care, particularly in low-income communities and communities of color.
 
Equal Pay for Women

Forty years ago, a woman would earn only 56% of what a man would earn in an identical job. Today, the pay gap is stuck at 77%. We aren't satisfied, and we won't quit until women earn equal pay for equal work.
 
Affordable Child Care & Quality Child Care Jobs

Did you know that the full-time child care costs for an infant eat up 41% of the average single mother's income? Or that the very people we rely on to take care of our children earn some of the lowest wages in the country? Affordable child care and quality child care jobs are essential to the health and stability of U.S. families. We need policies that support working parents and providers and reflect real family values. 
 
 
Whether it's a colleague, friend or family member, it is likely that you know someone who has been affected by child sexual abuse. Each of us has a role to play in breaking the silence and supporting solutions. Preventing child sexual abuse is within our power, and we are working to provide information, education and resources to keep our children safe. 
 
Immigration Law that's Right for Women
 
The majority of immigrants are women – women who are often concentrated in low-wage jobs without access to health care and other benefits, women who have fewer protections from gender-based violence, and women who disproportionately suffer from failed immigration policies. We're advancing immigrants' rights in support of women.

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Reports & Resources

Click here for Ms. Foundation publications.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Grants

We believe that women are the engine for change in their communities. By funding game changing organizations that are successfully addressing pivotal issues of reproductive health; affordable child care with living wage jobs; and ending child sexual abuse – we are having real impact on the lives of women, children, families and paving the road toward a nation of justice for all.
 
As a national grantmaker, we support organizations at all levels, from grassroots to state and national organizations. We believe that women most directly impacted by an issue are the real experts and we select groups that are of the community they work in.
We choose our grantees carefully, informed by decades of work in the field. Our goals is to connect with emerging and established groups poised to act when and where change is needed.

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Women's Resource Center

The Women's Resource Center is an integral part of Washington State University's commitment to equity and diversity. The Center works to promote a safe and supportive climate that enables women to engage as full and active participants within the university community. The Women's Resource Center helps transform the educational environment into a more inclusive and progressive institution by assisting, supporting, and mentoring women at Washington State University.

The Women's Resource Center develops programs to celebrate women's diversity and contributions, while actively confronting societal challenges and obstacles through activism and working for change. Our programs address gender, race, class, and their intersections, recognizing the relevance of these inter-related social issues. Offering resources and educational programs to members of our university, we engage the larger constituencies to act as change agents for a more diverse and inclusive educational system.

Contact


Pullman, WA 99164-4005
Ph. (509) 335-6849
Fx. (509) 335-4377
http://www.women.wsu.edu/
kim_barrett@wsu.edu


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Principal Staff

Turea Erwin, Director & NEW Leadership Inland Northwest Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-8200
E-mail: turea_erwin@wsu.edu

Kim Barrett, Program Support Specialist
Ph. (509) 335-4386
E-mail: kim_barrett@wsu.edu

Stephanie Russell, YWCA of WSU Program Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-2572
E-mail: stephanie.russell@email.wsu.edu

Joseph Pacific, Program Coordinator-Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services
Ph. (509) 335-1856
E-mail: jpacific@wsu.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
A core pillar of the Women's Resource Center, Women's Transit strives to extend the values of inspiration, encouragement, and empowerment to all students at Washignton State University. The primary goal of this program is to act as a resource to reduce the incidents of sexual assault in the community. Students who feel safe getting to and from classes, work, and social events are far more likely to succeed than students who are scared to simply live their lives while at school. We also believe that giving back to the community is incredibly important to a well-rounded education. We give nearly all students who apply the opportunity to learn valuable skills in communication, crisis management, and sexual assault risk reduction.
 
 
The Coalition for Women Students (CWS) was formed in 1912 as the Association for Women Students (AWS) by the Washington State College women students. The term “coalition” was adopted in the fall of 1993 to express a common vision for the student groups involved. A coalition is comprised of distinct groups or persons in alliance for joint action. In this case the joint action is heightening awareness of issues pertaining to women locally and globally.
 
 
APAW is committed to coordinating student programs that heighten awareness of Pacific and Asian women’s issues. APAW’s programs empower community and individual pride, celebrate our rich cultures, and highlight our diverse contributions. The Association of Pacific and Asian Women fosters leadership development opportunities for women by bringing ideas and vision into action on an individual and group level. Women’s leadership roles are supported and fostered within our organization.
 
 
The Black Women's Caucus (BWC) serves as a support system for African American Women on the WSU campus. Its main focus is to serve as an instrument through which African American women are able to express their concerns about issues they face globally as well as locally. BWC is also concerned with educating other students about the pioneering roles and major contributions of African American women in this society. Membership is open to all students who share the concerns of Black Women's Caucus.
 
 
Mujeres Unidas represents the interests and issues of Chicanas/Latinas at WSU and coordinates activities and opportunities of interest to multicultural women students. Members contribute to community projects and provide peer support for Chicanas and Latinas. In addition, MU provides women with the opportunity to gain leadership training and experience.
 
 
The purpose of the Native American Women's Association (NAWA) is to address the needs and concerns of Native American people, with a special emphasis on issues that affect Native American women. NAWA encourages women of color to assume leadership roles on campus and become actively involved in the community.
 
 
The YWCA of WSU is a member association of the YWCA of the USA. We have been part of the WSU community since 1895 and are proud to be part of this women's membership movement.

 


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Reports & Resources

Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
Whether you are looking to give two hours or fourty hours of your time this semester, Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services wants to bring you on as part of the team. No prior experience in ANYTHING is necessary. We will train everyone is driving, dispatching, and walking. You don't even need a driver license (we obviously won't place you as a driver, but there are many other things that you can do)!

 


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