Women in Fund Management

Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass — and Why it Matters

For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

Our report, Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass – and Why it Matters, explores the under-representation of women in the field, draws on research suggesting the benefits women can bring, and lays out concrete action steps for change. Specifically, we call on the financial services industry to develop a “critical mass principle” with quantifiable benchmarks and guidelines for increasing the number of women at all leadership levels.

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For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

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GIRLS FORUM: Kathy Cloninger--Developing Girls of Courage, Confidence, and Character

February 11, 2009 posted by admin According to a recent report by the Inter-Parliamentary Union, the United States ranks 69th in the world in female representation in our national legislature (just below Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, which tied for 68th). And the situation isn’t improving quickly; it’s been estimated that if we continue adding women in Congress at the current rate, we will reach parity in about 500 years. Women are grossly underrepresented not only in politics but in business; while we make up 51.3% of the population, but we account for only 15.7% of Fortune 500 corporate officers and 2% of Fortune 500 CEOs. This is not only a flagrant waste of brainpower, it’s dangerous; a number of people have made the observation that a higher proportion of women on Wall Street might well have prevented the economic meltdown we’re all suffering from. In other words, we have a leadership problem in this country,


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Gender Equality as an Investment Concept

January 23, 2009 posted by Shyama Venkateswar, Kyla Bender-Baird, and Lisa Rast The room was filled to capacity at Demos’ latest panel for their Women’s Leadership Initiative.  Women (and a few men) from all sectors joined together to discuss gender equality as an investment concept.  Anne Black from Goldman Sachs discussed their 10,000 Women initiative.  The driving idea behind this timely initiative is that investing in women’s business skills is the fastest way to grow GDP.  Joe Keefe from Pax World Mutual Fund, which recently took over Pax’s Women’s Equity Fund, argued that gender equality should be framed as an investment imperative, not a moral one. In fact, gender equality helps to grow the bottom line.  Finally, Ritu Sharma, co-founder of Women Thrive Worldwide, demonstrated the importance of building crucial infrastructure to aid women across the globe, who otherwise spend much of their day gathering water and fuel, and caregiving.


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