Women's & Girls' Leadership

From prime ministers to grass roots organizers, women and girls are attaining leadership positions in increasing numbers across government, civil society and the economy. But the glass ceiling is still firmly in place in many countries including in the US, where women are still vastly under-represented in government and senior leadership positions. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Abigail Quigley McCarthy Center for Women

 The Abigail Quigley McCarthy Center for Women’s Research, Resources, and Scholarship at St. Catherine University works to build a community of faculty and student scholars and activists working on issues of race, class, gender, and other differences; gather and share resources relating to these issues; and highlight the leadership and work of women at the University and in various communities for women’s justice and equality. 

Throughout its history, the Center has been a catalyst and supporter of many projects and programs that address women’s issues, from the building of a strong Women’s Studies program to a student-directed campaign to address the concerns of student parents. The Center’s commitment to open, honest dialogue about tough issues and a belief in the necessity of work for justice form the backbone of the work we do.

Contact

2004 Randolph Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105
Ph. 651-690-6783

http://www2.stkate.edu/center-for-women/home
aqmcenterforwomen@stkate.edu


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W
Member Organizations: 

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Steps to Political Equality from Gloria Thomas

By Gloria Thomas*

Women will not have achieved political equality until critical societal changes have taken place. First, women’s successes in being elected and appointed to political positions, corporate and non-profit executive leadership roles, as well as significant public and private boards must no longer be an anomaly to demonstrate equality has been accomplished. When we reach this point, there will no longer be a need for organizations like The White House Project to inspire women to run for public office. Nor will there be a need for other leadership programs designed to provide women with the skills and networks necessary to pursue various executive level positions and to provide the staying power to succeed once they are in these roles.


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Center for the Education of Women

The University of Michigan Center for the Education of Women (CEW) advances the personal, educational, career, professional and leadership potential of women. The services, programs, applied research, and action initiatives conducted by CEW promote inclusiveness and equity within the University, across the state and throughout the nation.

Founded in 1964, the Center for the Education of Women, within the University of Michigan, was one of the nation's first comprehensive, university-based centers focused on women.  Designed to serve the needs of women students as well as women returning to school or work, CEW (then known as the Center for the Continuing Education of Women) was founded with a three part mission of service, advocacy, and research. CEW maintains that mission today, serving University students, staff and faculty, community members, women and men, facing educational, employment or other life issues.

Contact

330 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2274
Ph. (734) 764-6005
Fx. (734) 998-6203
http://www.cew.umich.edu
cew.mail@umich.edu
contactcew@umich.edu

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Principal Staff

Gloria Thomas, Executive Director
Ph. (734) 764-7640
E-mail: gthomas@umich.edu

Wanlanda Ault, Fianance Assistant

Kristina Bee, Development and Scholarship Assistant

Jacqueline Bowman, Senior Counselor and Program Specialist

Eilisha Dermont, Communications Manager
Ph. (734) 764-6277
E-mail: edermont@umich.edu

Kirsten Elling, Associate Director for Counseling, Programs and Services

Connie Hansen, Assistant to the Director
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RESEARCH

Center researchers are currently analyzing the results of the Faculty Work-Life Study, a joint project of the Center for the Education of Women and the UM Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. The survey of UM faculty included questions about climate, workload, sources of satisfaction and stress, and incorporate AAUDI questions for comparison to similar institutions.  This project also provides comparison to the 1998 FWLS.

Contingent Faculty in a Tenure Track World - CEW researchers held focus groups with full- and part-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty at twelve research universities across the country. In total, we conducted 24 ninety-minute focus groups with a total of 343 full- and part-time NTT faculty. A report of the project is available  and a video based on the project explores the responses of focus group members. The project was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The National Clearinghouse on Academic Worklife  (www.academicworklife.org) combines into a single website information resources and community discussions to support those who study or participate in academic work.  Up to date articles and policy examples are available on topics ranging from family-friendly benefits, tenure attainment, and faculty satisfaction to policy development, productivity, and demographics.  An email newsletter is also available free to subscribers. This clearinghouse was developed  through a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Dual Career Ladder Project, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, resulted in several publications based on the findings of our institutional survey of U.S. institutions of higher education.  highlighting the numbers, working conditions and perceived contributions of non tenure track faculty.  These are available on the CEW website.

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

CEW’s Advanced Leadership Program offers middle management University of Michigan staff, recommended by their supervisors, an eight-month skill development workshop series and accompanying change management project.  This program has been offered annually for nearly 10 years. 

 

Focus on Leadership, addresses the need for leadership development and training for staff not yet in key middle-management positions or not yet ready for the more extensive Advanced Leadership Program.  Offered to approximately 30 individuals annually, this program offers participants an introduction to leadership concepts while it assists participants in developing an identity as a potential leader.

 

Emerging Leaders Iniative  CEW is currently developing an innovative nine-month program for emerging leaders (those with less than 6 years in their career fields) over the course of two years. The program will focus on women from a specific Michigan urban region, combining those from the private and the non-profit sectors.  The program combines in-person sessions, career coaching by senior leaders, and ongoing support and learning using web 2.0 tools including social media and online learning. 

PROGRAMS

CEW offers about 50 programs each term, covering topics such as careers, career change and job searching, work-life balance, leadership development, and focused programs for graduate students and post-docs.  In addition, CEW brings special events and speakers to the campus and community. 

In addition, CEW leads three support networks for University of Michigan women: Women of Color in the Academy Project and Junior Women Faculty Network for women faculty and the Women of Color Task Force for women staff.  These networks offer support, mentoring, and learning opportunities for participants.  The Task Force delivers a campus-wide career conference annually, with about 550 participants. 

CEW provides free counseling to students, faculty and staff of the University as well as to women and men in the community.  Each year over 1,000 adults are seen by CEW’s professional counselors.


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Reports & Resources

2012
 
"Factors Contributing to Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction among Non-Tenure-Track Faculty" By Jean Waltman, Inger Bergom, Carol Hollenshead, Jeanne Miller, and Louise August. The Journal of Higher Education, May/June 2012 83:3.  
 
Success for Nontraditional Students at Elite Institution, On Campus with Women v.40, no 3. By Gloria D. Thomas and Carol Hollenshead
 
2010
 
 
2009
 
 
"Satisfaction and Discontent: Voices of Non-Tenure-Track Faculty," By Inger Bergom and Jean Waltman. In On Campus With Women, vol 37, #3, 2009.
 
2008
 
Women of Color Faculty at the University of Michigan: Recruitment, Retention, and Campus Climate. Aimee Cox, PhD, Research Investigator Center for the Education of Women, CEW Jean Campbell Research Scholar (Executive Summary)
 
 
 
Developing a Transparent Tenure Process (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
Enabling Junior Faculty Success (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
2007
 

Post-Apartheid South Africa: Creating Critically Leaderful Schools that Make a Difference, 
Juliet Perumal, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) and CEW Visting Scholar, 2007.

How American Men's Participation in Housework and Child-care Affects Wives' Careers. 
Renge Jibu, CEW Visiting Scholar

 
 
 
2006
Attrition Among Female Tenure-Track Faculty, paper presented at AIR, May 18, 2006, Louise August
 
A Commitment to Volunteerism. Louise August, Carol Hollenshead and Sally Schmall
 

The Gender Impact of the Proposed Michigan Civil Rights Initiative: Research Brief. 
Susan Kaufmann

 

It Isn't Over: The Continuing Under-Representation of Female Faculty, paper presented at AIR, 
May 18, 2006, Louise August.

 
Non Tenure Track Faculty: The Landscape at U.S. Institutions of Higher Education: Full Report. Includes the Executive Summary as well as tables and charts reporting analyses of the survey data.
 
 
 
 
 
 
2005
 
 
 
 

Tenure Clock, Modified Duties, and Sick Leave Policies: Creating 'A Network of Support and Understanding' for University of Michigan Faculty Women During Pregnancy and Childbirth, 
Jean Waltman and Louise August

"Gender, Family, and Flexibility in Academia" Jeanne E. Miller and Carol Hollenshead in ChangeNovember/December 2005, pp.58-62
 
2004
 
"Developing and Implementing Work – Family Policies for Faculty," Beth Sullivan, Carol Hollenshead and Gilia Smith in Academe: Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors. November-December 2004.
 
2003
 
The 2003 Michigan Women's Leadership Index: Executive Summary, produced jointly by CEW and the Detroit Women's Economic Club.
 
Women at the University of Michigan: A Statistical Report on the Status of Women Students, Staff and Faculty on the Ann Arbor Campus, compiled by staff from CEW, Human Resource Records and Information Services, and the Office of Budget and Planning. (Replaced by 2010 Report)
 
2002
 
 
Sexing the Single Girl. Deborah Siegel, CEW Visiting Scholar
 
“Work/family policies in higher education: Survey data and case studies of policy implementation" by Carol S. Hollenshead, Beth Sullivan, Gilia C. Smith, Louise August, and Susan Hamilton is a chapter of The Challenge of Balancing Faculty Careers and Family Work, New Directions in Higher Education no. 130, 2005, 41-65.
 
2001
 
 
2000
 
 
Women and Higher Education 2000: Michigan: a "Smart State" for Women? Susan Kaufmann, Sally Sharp, Jeanne E. Miller, and Jean Waltman

Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity­ (Findings) A joint report from CEW, Catalyst, and the University of Michigan Business School 
Women and the MBA. The full report is available through Catalyst.

Before 2000
 
Former Women Faculty: Reasons for Leaving One Research University. Stacy A. Wenzel and Carol Hollenshead 1998

The Michigan Faculty Work-Life Study 1999. Executive SummaryComplete Report
.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholar Program

The Visiting Scholar Program is an opportunity for scholars to pursue research projects relevant to women using the vast resources available through the Center for the Education of Women (CEW) and the University of Michigan. Scholars must hold a Ph.D. or equivalent degree. A scholar's stay at the Center can range from one to twelve months, as appropriate to the scholar's research needs. Visiting Scholars prepare a working paper based upon their research, which is published as part of the Center's series of occasional papers.

Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship

The Center for the Education of Women announces the Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship with a grant of up to $3,200. The fund will support research by a graduate student from the Islamic World or Africa matriculating in the Rackham Graduate School.


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Center for Gender in Organizations

The work of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO), an academic research institute, serves as a fundamental call to action. Our research and experience repeatedly demonstrate that gender equity and diversity greatly improve work practice and overall organizational effectiveness.
 
Gender is an organizational issue. Our research emphatically shows that businesses benefit when they view gender equity as a strategic imperative and a source of competitive advantage.

Contact

300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
Ph. 617-521-3824
Fx. 617-521-3878
http://www.simmons.edu/som/centers/cgo/index.php
cgo@simmons.edu


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Principal Staff

Patricia Deyton, Director
Specialization: Nonprofit and general management, gender and diversity
E-mail: patricia.deyton@simmons.edu

Stacy Blake-Beard, Senior Faculty Affiliate
Specialization: Organization behavior, mentoring, diversity
E-mail: stacy.blakebeard@simmons.edu
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Gender, Equity, and Change

The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) takes a unique approach to addressing gender and diversity issues in the workplace. Rather than seeing gender as a problem that individual women and men confront at work, we believe gender is deeply embedded in an organization's culture and practices. It is at this level of analysis that the most significant research is undertaken and from which real change emerges.

Leadership

Understanding leadership similarities and differences of women and men as well as their resulting impact on organizations is a linchpin of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) research. In addition to studying leadership issues, we also regularly examine the progress women have made in achieving leadership positions in varied organizations to understand the lessons learned and consider, as well, the contributions made by role models and mentors.

Diversity

CGO uses a "complexity lens" to understand gender and diversity. Through this lens, differences are seen as a simultaneous process of identity and institutional practices. The new insight gained through the use of this lens has led CGO to the development of a theory of simultaneity to strengthen diversity efforts. Simply stated, the theory works with the reality that all people have multiple identities, all of which are present "at the table" in any interaction and any of which may be more or less salient in any particular situation.

Globalization

Globalization research focuses on the growing interconnectedness of workforces, stemming from trends such as outsourcing, immigration and technological change. The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) seeks to understand the impact of multiple cultures and identities on work practices and global workforce productivity and to help ensure that traditional white, North American standards are not automatically applied to the rest of the world.

Entrepreneurship


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Reports & Resources

CGO Commentaries

CGO Commentaries are articles adapted from talks or papers delivered by our faculty affiliates and other distinguished scholars and practitioners. They highlight current and emerging topics in gender equity, diversity and organizational studies.

CGO Insights Briefing Notes

CGO Insights is a series of short briefing notes on topics promoting organizational effectiveness through improved gender equity and diversity. These are written for practitioners and scholars alike.

CGO Working Papers

CGO Working Papers disseminate trends and new developments in research, theory, and practice related to gender equity, diversity and organizational effectiveness.

Books

CGO faculty and affiliates have authored and edited more than a dozen books. CGO faculty affiliates have authored and edited many books.


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Center News

Institute for Research on Women

At the forefront of feminist research for over thirty years, the Institute for Research on Women (IRW) advances cutting-edge, interdisciplinary scholarship on gender, sexuality and women. Part of the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the IRW was founded in 1977 by faculty and administrators seeking to expand feminist scholarship and activism beyond the university’s fledgling Women’s Studies program. Today, the IRW supports a broad range of programming designed to stimulate research on gender, sexuality and women within and across the disciplines, throughout and beyond Rutgers. Promoting faculty and student connections and building intellectual community are also central to the IRW’s mission.

Contact

160 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8555
Ph. (732) 932-9072
Fx. (732) 932-0861
http://irw.rutgers.edu/
irw@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel, Ph.D., Director

Sarah Tobias, Ph.D., Associate Director
E-mail: stobias@rci.rutgers.edu

Marlene Importico, Program Coordinator
E-mail: importic@rci.rutgers.edu

Yomaira Figueroa, IRW Learning Community Coordinator
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The IRW fosters feminist research at Rutgers through creative programming tied to an annual theme. The weekly Faculty/Graduate Seminar brings together faculty and advanced graduate students from a broad range of disciplines and from all three Rutgers campuses. Participants present works-in-progress, addressing the IRW’s annual theme from a range of disciplinary and methodological perspectives. The Distinguished Lecture Series presents innovative research by prominent feminist scholars and activists from Rutgers and other universities, exploring the annual theme in depth. The Undergraduate Learning Community extends the strengths of the IRW’s programs and research community to advanced undergraduate students who attend the IRW’s lecture series, develop research projects related to the annual theme, and work with IRW seminar fellows as mentors. Recent annual themes have included The Culture of Rights/The Rights of Culture (2008-9), Gendered Agency (2009-10) and The Art & Science of Happiness (2010-11).
 
In addition to its thematic programming, the IRW regularly organizes a one-to-three day Spring Colloquium addressing emergent debates in feminist activism and scholarship. Previous topics include the intersections of labor, class and sexuality; immigrant women’s collective organizing and the tensions between gender and disability studies.
 
Other regular programs include a workshop on Negotiating Basics for Women Entering the Academic Job Market, featuring women faculty of different ranks from the sciences, social sciences and humanities, and a Graduate Student Forum on Feminist Scholarship, enabling graduate students to share and receive feedback on their research.

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Reports & Resources

Books

Gender and Culture at the Limits of Rights, edited by Dorothy L. Hodgson (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), explores the concept of "women's rights as human rights” and the way in which a rights-based analysis can promote or limit the attainment of gender justice. Most of the essays in the volume were originally presented as part of the 2008-9 IRW seminar and its accompanying spring colloquium.

No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminism, edited by Nancy Hewitt (Rutgers University Press, 2010) showcases a group of papers that were first presented at an IRW colloquium. The contributors "address issues of race, class and sexuality within histories of women's rights and feminism as well as the cultural and intellectual currents and social and political priorities that marked movements for women's advancement and liberation. The concept of waves surging and receding cannot fully capture these multiple and overlapping movements, chronologies, issues, and sites."

The papers collected in The Sex of Class: Women Transforming American Labor, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble (Cornell University Press, 2007), examines the role sex plays in the workforce, as well as contemporary and historical domestic and global labor movements. 

The Journal of International Labor and Working-Class History issued a special edition on “Working-Class Subjectivities and Sexualities” in Spring 2006. Edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble and Victoria Hattam, several of the articles in this volume were first presented as papers at spring colloquium organized by the IRW and ILWCH in 2004. 

Gendering Disability, edited by Bonnie G. Smith and Beth Hutchison (Rutgers University Press, 2004), collects work presented at a three-day IRW conference that brought together gender studies and disabilities studies scholars.

Feminist Locations: Local and Global, Theory and Practice edited by Marianne DeKoven (Rutgers University Press, 2001), is based on scholarship presented at the IRW from 1995 to 1998.

Transitions, Environments, Translations: Feminisms in International Politics edited by Joan W. Scott, Cora Kaplan, and Debra Keates (Routledge, 1997), from work presented at a conference jointly presented by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton and the IRW.

With the Women's Rights Litigation Clinic at Rutgers Law School-Newark, the IRW co-sponsored The Project on Reproductive Rights Laws for the 1990s which culminated in the 1989 Rutgers University Press volume Reproductive Laws for the 1990s, co-edited by Sherrill Cohen and Nadine Taub.

Describing the impetus for Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory and Writing By Black Women (Rugters University Press, 1989), Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English Cheryl Wall writes, “I took the idea for a one-day conference to then-IRW director Carol Smith, who embraced it enthusiastically. The conference on October 22-23, 1987, was one of the most gratifying experiences of my career. The room for the symposium was filled with many of the most brilliant scholars and writers of my generation. The book became one of the foundational texts in black feminist criticism. I will forever be grateful for the support of the IRW.”

Women, Households, and the Economy, edited by Lourdes Beneria and Catharine R. Stimpson (Rutgers University Press, 1987), collects papers presented at a two-day conference stemming from a grant from the Russell Sage Foundation “to bring together a group of scholars on the cutting edge of the thinking about women and the economy.”

Working Papers

Revised and condensed versions of work presented at our weekly seminar have been published in four volumes. Copies are available on request from the IRW. 
 
Femininities, Masculinities, and The Politics of Sexual Difference(s): Working Papers from the 2003-2004 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Beth Hutchison and Amanda B. Chaloupka
 
Reconfiguring Class and Gender: Working Papers from the 2002-2003 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Amanda B. Chaloupka, and Beth Hutchison
 
Modes of Knowledge and Action: Working Papers from the Women in the Public Sphere Seminar 1998-1999, edited by Beth Hutchison
 

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 Visiting Global Scholars

As part of its commitment to foster feminist research at Rutgers and beyond, the IRW hosts feminist researchers from around the world as visiting global scholars. Visiting global scholars are able to pursue their own research and writing in a supportive environment and access Rutgers’ unique feminist resources. They also participate in the IRW seminar, present public lectures to the university community and speak in classes and community forums.


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Ms. Foundation for Women

Forty years ago, four visionary women established the Ms. Foundation for Women to elevate women's voices and create positive change. Today, we're a dynamic and powerful entity that is leading the charge on women's issues nationwide.
 
We start with the knowledge that our fight is not yet over. It's true that women have come a long way since the 1970s, but for every woman who has reached the "top" (and who still face discrimination, by the way), there are millions of women struggling to earn a living wage, gain access to basic health care, secure affordable child care and participate in the opportunities that should be available to every person in the U.S.
 
At the Ms. Foundation, we work to bring attention to the real challenges facing women, especially women of color and low-income women, living in poverty, working paycheck to paycheck or both.

Contact

12 MetroTech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Ph. 212/742-2300
Fx. 212/742-1653
http://forwomen.org/
info@ms.foundation.org


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Principal Staff

Anika Rahman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Deborah Jacobs, Vice President, Advocacy and Policy

Alesia Soltanpanah, Vice President, Development
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Projects & Campaigns

 
It's ridiculous and alarming that birth control and basic health services are still "controversial." We're leading the fight to protect women's reproductive rights, including abortion, access to contraception and health care, particularly in low-income communities and communities of color.
 
Equal Pay for Women

Forty years ago, a woman would earn only 56% of what a man would earn in an identical job. Today, the pay gap is stuck at 77%. We aren't satisfied, and we won't quit until women earn equal pay for equal work.
 
Affordable Child Care & Quality Child Care Jobs

Did you know that the full-time child care costs for an infant eat up 41% of the average single mother's income? Or that the very people we rely on to take care of our children earn some of the lowest wages in the country? Affordable child care and quality child care jobs are essential to the health and stability of U.S. families. We need policies that support working parents and providers and reflect real family values. 
 
 
Whether it's a colleague, friend or family member, it is likely that you know someone who has been affected by child sexual abuse. Each of us has a role to play in breaking the silence and supporting solutions. Preventing child sexual abuse is within our power, and we are working to provide information, education and resources to keep our children safe. 
 
Immigration Law that's Right for Women
 
The majority of immigrants are women – women who are often concentrated in low-wage jobs without access to health care and other benefits, women who have fewer protections from gender-based violence, and women who disproportionately suffer from failed immigration policies. We're advancing immigrants' rights in support of women.

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Reports & Resources

Click here for Ms. Foundation publications.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Grants

We believe that women are the engine for change in their communities. By funding game changing organizations that are successfully addressing pivotal issues of reproductive health; affordable child care with living wage jobs; and ending child sexual abuse – we are having real impact on the lives of women, children, families and paving the road toward a nation of justice for all.
 
As a national grantmaker, we support organizations at all levels, from grassroots to state and national organizations. We believe that women most directly impacted by an issue are the real experts and we select groups that are of the community they work in.
We choose our grantees carefully, informed by decades of work in the field. Our goals is to connect with emerging and established groups poised to act when and where change is needed.

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Ann Ida Gannon Center for Women and Leadership

The Gannon Center for Women and Leadership within Loyola University Chicago is dedicated to the development of women as scholars and leaders. The center aims to provide outstanding role models and mentors and to offer resources and research data that enable women to expand upon their workplace, community, and academic contributions. The four areas of activity of the center are: Women and Leadership Archives, Women Studies Program, Institute for Women and Leadership, and a Heritage Room representing Mundelein College.

Contact

1032 W. Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60660
Ph. 773-508-8430
Fx. 773-508-8492
http://www.luc.edu/gannon/
gannoncenter@luc.edu


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Principal Staff

Dawn A. Harris, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: gannoncenter@luc.edu


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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Baum Speaker Series

In 2006, the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership became the fortunate recipient of a bequest from the estate of the late Ann and Alvin Baum Family for a speaker series. The series invites women of national and international renown to frame an informed discussion with members of our Loyola community, our neighborhood and city on issues at the intersection of women and leadership, public policy and social justice.

 


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Gannon Scholars

The Gannon Scholars Leadership Program is a four-year progressive program that engages students in the development of leadership, service and scholarship. We provide opportunities for leaders to investigate and analyze areas of concern in our suffering world in order to creatively design and apply workable solutions to build a more just social world order. Working collaboratively within the University and with global and local partners, we promote an innovative and interdisciplinary approach to shape women leaders for the 21st Century.

Faculty Fellows Program

To encourage research on women and their contributions to society, and to promote active learning and scholarship, the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership is pleased to sponsor the Faculty Fellowship Program in Women's Studies Scholarship. Funded by the Gannon Center's Endowment, up to two fellows will be appointed for the Spring semester each year and released from a semester of teaching. (The fellowship does not include release from the faculty member's other departmental or college duties. Faculty applying for the program should negotiate these duties with his/her chair and/or Dean.) Special consideration will be given to the study of women and leadership.

Johnson Scholarship

The Carroll and Adelaide Johnson Scholarship Fund offers rising juniors of Loyola University Chicago opportunities to conduct interdisciplinary research related to a social justice issue that is focused on women and leadership. The Johnsons established the fund through Loyola University's Gannon Center for Women and Leadership for students with demonstrated financial need.

Visiting Scholars Program

The Visiting Scholar Program brings researchers from around the world to Loyola for a month to a year to study issues of concern to women. The primary purpose of the program is to provide research support for a scholar conducting research on women's issues. The Visiting Scholar is awarded an office within the lakeside center, a computer and Internet access, library privileges and the friendly support of a community of feminists. The Gannon Center is located on the second floor of Piper Hall. Its location on the northeast side of Chicago offers easy access to public transportation for research work in notable libraries and archives in the area as well as exceptional cultural opportunities. The center has a developing Women and Leadership Archives that may be helpful to some scholars.

WISER (Women in Science Enabling Research)

The WISER program was designed in 1993 to provide undergraduate women at Loyola University Chicago with an introduction to laboratory research, and to create a community of scientists through which undergraduate women could be mentored and encouraged toward careers in the sciences. Students are welcome to participate in and attend lectures, panel discussions, and workshops organized by WISER. Undergraduate students are also invited to apply to the Laura L. Mayer Summer Internship Program as a means of gaining laboratory experience.


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International Center for Research on Women

ICRW's mission is to empower women, advance gender equality and fight poverty in the developing world. To accomplish this, ICRW works with partners to conduct empirical research, build capacity and advocate for evidence-based, practical ways to change policies and programs.

Contact

1120 20th St. N.W.
Washington, DC 20036
Ph. (202) 797-0007
Fx. (202) 797-0020
http://www.icrw.org
info@icrw.org


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Principal Staff

Sarah Degnan Kambou, President

Lyric Thompson, Special Assistant to the President/Policy Advocate

Kristin Fack, Administrative Assistant
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Adolescents

ICRW has been examining the lives of adolescents – especially girls – for more than two decades. Our work focuses on improving their well-being and identifying ways to change deeply entrenched traditional practices that prevent girls and young women from reaching their full potential. We believe that making the abilities, attitudes and options of adolescent girls and boys more equitable is one of the most effective ways to empower women. And our research shows that all aspects of young people’s lives – school, relationships, work, health and marriage – must be addressed in order to bring about lasting social change. Adolescent programs and policies require working with not only girls, but boys, parents, teachers, community members, leaders, schools and employers, too.
 
 
ICRW has been examining for more than 30 years how disparities between women and men affect agricultural productivity and food security. Our research helps development organizations, policymakers and others find practical ways to enhance women’s roles in agricultural production and trade, thereby improving their incomes and livelihoods.

ICRW analyzes the differences between the responsibilities, limitations and interests of male and female farmers to design strategies that provide services, training and incomes. Our findings and recommendations help identify sound approaches that ensure efforts reach women as well as men. Ultimately, we aim to help farmers become competitive participants in the agricultural marketplace and reap the financial benefits.
 
 
Economic development efforts to combat poverty can only succeed if women are part of the solution. Doing so yields a double dividend: When women are economically empowered, they raise healthier, better educated families. Their countries are more economically prosperous because of it, too.

Since our founding more than 30 years ago, ICRW's work has expanded understanding of women's economic contributions as well as the hurdles that prevent them from being successful. Our efforts focus on how gender affects economic development efforts related to assets and property rights as well as employment, enterprise development and financial services.
 
We strive to increase women's ownership, use and control of assets and property. We want to empower women as economic agents and better their ability to access markets on competitive and equitable terms. And with our partners, ICRW aims to integrate gender perspectives into program and institution activities. We believe such an approach improves the likelihood that efforts to strengthen women economically are successful.
 
 
ICRW was among the first organizations in the early 1990s to call attention to how gender inequality fueled the transmission of HIV and AIDS among women. Today, ICRW continues to push the AIDS agenda forward. As the global response moves from a focus on crisis management into a sustained, long-term strategy, our work centers around how HIV programs and policies can better serve the needs of women and girls. We work with partners to design, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of programs that strive to reduce women's social and biological vulnerability to HIV. We also aim to weave these programs into existing family planning, reproductive and maternal health services. Ultimately, we strive to influence national policies by guiding governments and others on how to address the role that gender norms play in the prevention, support and treatment of HIV.
 
 
ICRW strives to demonstrate that improved sexual and reproductive health outcomes are pre-conditions for achieving gender equality, empowering women and reducing global poverty. ICRW’s research in this area aims to build a sound evidence base to inform programs and policies by defining the fundamental connections between gender, reproductive health and development, highlighting the importance of adolescent transitions to adulthood, analyzing means for facilitating women’s access to safe and effective reproductive control options, and undertaking rigorous evaluations to demonstrate what works.
 
Our approach examines how gender equality is both a determinant and a consequence of demographic change. For example, our current research suggests that as fertility rates decline in developing countries, women gain increased access to higher education and formal employment opportunities. This in turn can facilitate more transformative shifts in gender relations. Findings such as these bolster the policy directive that advancing women’s and girls’ reproductive health creates conditions that improve the quality of life for individuals, families, communities and nations.
 
 
ICRW employs a multifaceted approach to reducing violence against women. We conduct empirical research to better understand the incidence of violence, costs associated with it and factors that lead to it. We also are building evidence on interventions designed to prevent violence against women, particularly comprehensive approaches that include economically empowering women, involving boys and men, protecting survivors of violence and rehabilitating men who are abusive. ICRW is examining the policy dimensions of violence prevention by evaluating the impact of and challenges to existing legislation and using our findings to advocate for stronger, more effective laws. Finally, ICRW participates in strategic regional and global networks that work to strengthen civil society and advance the field of preventing violence against women.

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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

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Girl Scouts of the USA

Founded in 1912, the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), has long been preparing girls for leadership roles. As the largest voluntary organization for girls in the world, the Girl Scouts are committed to peaking the interest and listening to the voices of millions of girls, as well as the women and men who serve them. The purpose of Girl Scouting is to inspire girls with the highest ideals of character and conduct, so that they may become capable and inspired citizens. Girl Scouting seeks to accomplish this goal through innovative programs that provide girls with opportunities to explore the world's possibilities while having fun with their peers in supportive, all-girl settings.

Contact

420 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10018-2798
Ph. (212) 852-8000 / 1 800 478-7248
Fx. (212) 852-6509/6510
http://www.girlscouts.org



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Principal Staff

Anna Maria Chávez, CEO

Connie L. Lindsey, Chair of the National Board of Directors

Nhadine Leung, Chief of Staff

Delphia York Duckens, Senior Vice President, Fund Development

Jaclyn E. Libowitz, Chief of Staff

Florence Corsello, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Business Services

Danny Boockvar, Chief Customer Officer, Girl Scouts of the USA

Deb Taft, Chief Development Officer, Girl Scouts of the USA

Michael Watson, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Girl Scouts of the USA
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The National Program Portfolio

The National Program Portfolio has two main parts – the National Leadership Journeys and the all new The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting. Complemented by the Girl Scout Cookie program, Girl Scout travel and Girl Scout awards, the National Program Portfolio is designed to help girls develop as leaders and build confidence by learning new skills. It also ensures that Girl Scouts at every level are sharing a powerful, national experience—girls together changing the world!

Journeys

On every Leadership Journey, everything girls do—whether it's performing science experiments, creating art projects, cooking simple meals, or learning to protect the planet's water supply—is aimed at giving them the benefits of the Girl Scout "Keys to Leadership": Discover, Connect, Take Action.

Girl's Guide

Everyone knows that Girl Scouts have badges. But The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting has more than just exciting, new badges for every age level. Each guide contains: 

-A colorful, easy-to-use binder specially designed for girls at each level. The binder comes chock full of essential information and badge activities—plus girls get to customize their own experience by choosing and adding in additional badge sets.

-Legacy, Financial Literacy, and Cookie Business badge activities—or, for Girl Scout Daisies, petal and leaf activities. For more information about the National Proficiency badges, check out How the National Girl Scout Program Portfolio Works.

-A detailed diagram showing where girls place the badges, pins, or awards with pride on their vests or sashes.
Ideas to help girls tie their badges right into their Journeys.
 
-Vintage illustrations and quotes from Girl Scout history to help girls feel connected to the proud traditions of the past.
An awards log showing girls every award and badge available at their level, as well as the entire badge program at every level, so girls can see how their skills will grow in Girl Scouting.
 
Highest Awards
 
We know you want to do good things for the world. Help the people who need it most. Protect animals that can't speak for themselves. Treat the environment with the respect it deserves. We know you have great ideas, ones that make a lasting difference. And that you're more than ready to work hard to put those ideas into motion. Girl Scouting's highest awards—the Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards—are your chance to make a lasting difference in your community . . . and in the larger world. Click below. And start changing the world today!
 
Travel
 
Every girl deserves a chance to see the world. Girl Scouts offers many different travel opportunities so girls can see new places, meet new people, and learn about different cultures and ideas. Whether exploring their own neighborhoods, going on overnight camping trips, participating in community service projects, or flying to one of the four world centers, Girl Scouts are continually expanding their horizons.
 
Girl Scout Cookies
 
When a Girl Scout sells you cookies, she's building a lifetime of skills and confidence. She learns goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics—aspects essential to leadership, to success, and to life.
By putting her mind and energies to something, a Girl Scout can overcome any challenge. There are no limits. She can be anything. She can do anything.
 
Program Basics
 
Girl Scouts earn badges, hike and camp, participate in the cookie program, and much more. They improve neighborhoods, protect the planet, design robots, and establish sports clinics. See what a great Girl Scout year can look like for each grade level by visiting Girl Scout GPS!
 
Girl Scout program starts girls off on a Journey of their choice from the National Leadership Journeys series. They'll earn awards, have fun, and take on projects that change the world.
 
Girls then add The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting to their program portfolio. TheGirl's Guide offers girls national proficiency badges, traditions and history, an awards log, and much more. Let Brownie Elf walk you through a fun video (below) describing the Girl's Guide. For complete information about what girls from kindergarten through high school do in Girl Scouts and the awards they can earn, please see the main Program page.

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Reports & Resources

 
While lack of financial literacy is a growing concern for everyone today, relatively little research has been done on how young people think about and experience money and finances, with even fewer studies focusing on girls specifically. To address this gap, the Girl Scout Research Institute conducted a nationwide survey with over 1,000 girls ages 8−17 and their parents to better understand girls' level of financial literacy and their confidence about, attitudes towards, and experiences with money. Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy reveals that girls need and want financial literacy skills to help them achieve their dreams, with 90 percent saying it is important for them to learn how to manage money. However, just 12 percent of girls surveyed feel "very confident" making financial decisions.

Financial Literacy

Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy (2013)

Girls and Media

The Net Effect: Girls and New Media (2002)

Beauty Redefined: Girls and Body Image Survey (2010)

Who's That Girl: Image and Social Media Survey (2010)

Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV (2011)

Girl Leadership, Beliefs, and Values

The Resilience Factor: A Key to Leadership in African American and Hispanic Girls (2011)

Good Intentions: The Beliefs and Values of Teens and Tweens Today (2009)

Transforming Leadership Continued (2009)

The New Leadership Landscape: What Girls Say About Election 2008 (2009)

Transforming Leadership: Focusing on Outcomes of the New Girl Scout Leadership Experience (2008)

Change It Up! What Girls Say About Redefining Leadership (2008)

Exploring Girls' Leadership (2007)

Girl Scouts Survey on The Beliefs and Moral Values of America's Children (1989)

Girl and Youth Development

Paths to Positive Youth Development (2003)

The Ten Emerging Truths: New Directions for Girls 11-17 (2002)

Snapshots of Young Lives Today (2001)

Healthy Living

Beauty Redefined: Girls and Body Image Survey (2010)

The New Normal? What Girls Say About Healthy Living (2006)

Weighing In: Helping Girls Be Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow (2004)

Feeling Safe: What Girls Say (2003)

How America's Youth Are Faring Since September 11th (2002)

Teens Before Their Time (2000)

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (2012)

The Net Effect: Girls and New Media (2002)

The Girl Difference: Short-Circuiting the Myth of the Technophobic Girl (2001)

Volunteerism

Voices of Volunteers 18-29 (2003)

The Community Connection: Volunteer Trends in a Changing World (2002)

National Profile of Adults in Girl Scouting: Executive Summary (1998)

Girl Scout Outcomes

Linking Leadership to Academic Success: The Girl Scout Difference (2012)

Mapping the Girl Scout Leadership Experience Outcomes to the Search Institute's Youth Developmental Assets(2012)

Transforming Leadership Continued (2009)**

Transforming Leadership: Focusing on Outcomes of the New Girl Scout Leadership Experience (2008)**

Girl Scouts Beyond Bars Evaluation Report (2008)**

GirlSports Basics National Evaluation (2003)

Junior Girl Scout Group Experience: Outcomes Measurement Guide (2002)

Tool Kit data analysis supplement (2001)

Tool Kit for Measuring Outcomes of Girl Scout Resident Camp (2000)

Girls, Families, and Communities Grow Through Girl Scouting (1997)

Girl Scouting

Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact Study (2012)

Defining Success: American Women, Achievement, and the Girl Scouts (1999)

National Profile of Adults in Girl Scouting: Executive Summary (1998)

Strength in Diversity: Toward a Broader Understanding of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Girl Scouting: Final Report (1994)

The Girl Scout Experience Among Young Girls Today: Towards a Marketing Strategy for Girl Scouting (1992)

Girl Scouts: Its Role in the Lives of American Women of Distinction (1991)

Girl Scouts: Who We Are, What We Think (1990)


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