Women's Leadership

Critical Mass on Corporate Boards: Why Three or More Women Enhance Governance

Does it matter to corporate governance whether women serve on a board? If so, does it make a difference how many women serve? Is there a critical mass that can bring significant change to the boardroom and improve corporate governance?

URL: 
http://www.wcwonline.org/pdf/CriticalMassExecSummary.pdf
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Clearing The Hurdles: Women Building High Growth Businesses

Starting, funding, and growing a new venture are significant challenges for every entrepreneur. For women, the hurdles are even higher, due to widely held perceptions about them, their capabilities, and their businesses. Now, five leading experts on women dedicated to achieving success and claiming the rewards.

URL: 
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/clearing-the-hurdles/candida-brush/e/9780131112018

Medical women in academia: the silences we keep

There are more medical women today in academia as students, residents and faculty than ever before. However, a certain silence continues to dismiss the challenges they face in balancing career demands, family life, gender biases and harassment. This same silence continues to perpetuate a culture that is inhospitable to the retention of women in academic medicine.
 

URL: 
http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/reprint/167/8/877.pdf

Inside Women’s Power: Learning from Leaders

This book is based on an analysis of 60 interviews with prominent U.S. women regarding their leadership practices. Using a life course developmental perspective, the study places the leadership experiences of these prominent Caucasian leaders and leaders of color in a socio-historical context. The results show the progress to date, and what remains to be accomplished to achieve gender equity in leadership.

URL: 
http://www.wcwonline.org/component/page,shop.product_details/flypage,shop.flypage/product_id,784/category_id,410/manufacturer_id,0/option,com_virtuemart/Itemid,175/vmcchk,1/
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Top Organizations Preparing Our Future Female Leaders

The Glass Hammer, January 14th, 2010

Jacqueline B. Libster (New York City)

Creating workforce gender equality is a multifaceted project, including the work to help women at the top right now, as well as planting the seeds for success for future generations. That’s why many organizations are working to help girls and young women develop leadership skills that will carry them from the classroom to the boardroom, by:

A First For New Jersey

When Susan Shin Angulo raised her right hand and put her left on the Bible last week, she broke through a barrier in New Jersey that had never been shattered before. After being sworn in by Assemblyman Louis D. Greenwald, Angulo became the first Korean-American woman to hold a seat in government in the state.
While there have been several Korean-American men to hold various governmental positions in the state, the Center for American Women and Politics in Rutgers University’s Eagleton Institute of Politics said Angulo is the first female government official of Korean descent to serve in any of the state’s elected public offices.

Women Leaders Gain Ground in NJ Politics

New Jersey inaugurated its first lieutenant governor, Kim Guadagno, yesterday but that was just one of a few firsts this year for women in state government.
While the spotlight may be on the state’s executive branch now, women made strides in the state’s legislature also. Assemblywoman Sheila Oliver, D-Essex, took office last Tuesday to become the state’s first black female and second overall female speaker of the Assembly, while Rutgers School of Law-Camden graduate Senator Barbara Buono, D-Middlesex, rose to a position as the legislative body’s majority speaker.
“To have women in such significant leadership roles really marks a change in politics in the state of New Jersey,” said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at the Eagleton Institute of Politics.
The state now ranks 16th in the nation in terms of the percentage of women serving in state legislature, she said.

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