Women's Leadership

Inside Women’s Power: Learning from Leaders

This book is based on an analysis of 60 interviews with prominent U.S. women regarding their leadership practices. Using a life course developmental perspective, the study places the leadership experiences of these prominent Caucasian leaders and leaders of color in a socio-historical context. The results show the progress to date, and what remains to be accomplished to achieve gender equity in leadership.

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Top Organizations Preparing Our Future Female Leaders

The Glass Hammer, January 14th, 2010

Jacqueline B. Libster (New York City)

Creating workforce gender equality is a multifaceted project, including the work to help women at the top right now, as well as planting the seeds for success for future generations. That’s why many organizations are working to help girls and young women develop leadership skills that will carry them from the classroom to the boardroom, by:

A First For New Jersey

When Susan Shin Angulo raised her right hand and put her left on the Bible last week, she broke through a barrier in New Jersey that had never been shattered before. After being sworn in by Assemblyman Louis D. Greenwald, Angulo became the first Korean-American woman to hold a seat in government in the state.
While there have been several Korean-American men to hold various governmental positions in the state, the Center for American Women and Politics in Rutgers University’s Eagleton Institute of Politics said Angulo is the first female government official of Korean descent to serve in any of the state’s elected public offices.

Women Leaders Gain Ground in NJ Politics

New Jersey inaugurated its first lieutenant governor, Kim Guadagno, yesterday but that was just one of a few firsts this year for women in state government.
While the spotlight may be on the state’s executive branch now, women made strides in the state’s legislature also. Assemblywoman Sheila Oliver, D-Essex, took office last Tuesday to become the state’s first black female and second overall female speaker of the Assembly, while Rutgers School of Law-Camden graduate Senator Barbara Buono, D-Middlesex, rose to a position as the legislative body’s majority speaker.
“To have women in such significant leadership roles really marks a change in politics in the state of New Jersey,” said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at the Eagleton Institute of Politics.
The state now ranks 16th in the nation in terms of the percentage of women serving in state legislature, she said.

Is Oakland Ready? Jean Quan Hopes To Crack Mayoral Ceiling

If all politics is local, Oakland City Council member Jean Quan should get a fair shake in that town's mayoral race this year against former California state Senate leader Don Perata. Quan, one of 12 women to ever serve on the City Council (and the first Asian-American woman), hopes to give Perata a run for his money (and he is said to have much more of it than she) on the merits of her two-plus decades of community-oriented work in Oakland.

Legislative Gains For Women a Hopeful Trend

 By My Central Jersey

 

January 3, 2010

 

 

For the first time ever, New Jersey finds itself among the top 10 states for representation of women in its state

Legislature.That trend indicates real opportunities for women in accessing levers of power.

It's a trend that should also be fostered and encouraged.To put it simply, democracies are strongest when those in

public office reflect the diversity of their populations.That includes gender as well as race. Just five short years ago, New

Jersey was ranked 43rd in the United States in terms of female representation in its state Legislature. Since then, seven  

assemblywomen and two female senators were elected to bring the total to 38 among the state's 120 lawmakers.

Top Fund Managers of the Decade Nominees Reflect Scarcity of Women

December 14, 2009 Posted by Vivienne Heston-Demirel


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