Women's Leadership

Ann Ida Gannon Center for Women and Leadership

The Gannon Center for Women and Leadership within Loyola University Chicago is dedicated to the development of women as scholars and leaders. The center aims to provide outstanding role models and mentors and to offer resources and research data that enable women to expand upon their workplace, community, and academic contributions. The four areas of activity of the center are: Women and Leadership Archives, Women Studies Program, Institute for Women and Leadership, and a Heritage Room representing Mundelein College.

Contact

1032 W. Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60660
Ph. 773-508-8430
Fx. 773-508-8492
http://www.luc.edu/gannon/
gannoncenter@luc.edu


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Principal Staff

Dawn A. Harris, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: gannoncenter@luc.edu


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Baum Speaker Series

In 2006, the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership became the fortunate recipient of a bequest from the estate of the late Ann and Alvin Baum Family for a speaker series. The series invites women of national and international renown to frame an informed discussion with members of our Loyola community, our neighborhood and city on issues at the intersection of women and leadership, public policy and social justice.

 


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Gannon Scholars

The Gannon Scholars Leadership Program is a four-year progressive program that engages students in the development of leadership, service and scholarship. We provide opportunities for leaders to investigate and analyze areas of concern in our suffering world in order to creatively design and apply workable solutions to build a more just social world order. Working collaboratively within the University and with global and local partners, we promote an innovative and interdisciplinary approach to shape women leaders for the 21st Century.

Faculty Fellows Program

To encourage research on women and their contributions to society, and to promote active learning and scholarship, the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership is pleased to sponsor the Faculty Fellowship Program in Women's Studies Scholarship. Funded by the Gannon Center's Endowment, up to two fellows will be appointed for the Spring semester each year and released from a semester of teaching. (The fellowship does not include release from the faculty member's other departmental or college duties. Faculty applying for the program should negotiate these duties with his/her chair and/or Dean.) Special consideration will be given to the study of women and leadership.

Johnson Scholarship

The Carroll and Adelaide Johnson Scholarship Fund offers rising juniors of Loyola University Chicago opportunities to conduct interdisciplinary research related to a social justice issue that is focused on women and leadership. The Johnsons established the fund through Loyola University's Gannon Center for Women and Leadership for students with demonstrated financial need.

Visiting Scholars Program

The Visiting Scholar Program brings researchers from around the world to Loyola for a month to a year to study issues of concern to women. The primary purpose of the program is to provide research support for a scholar conducting research on women's issues. The Visiting Scholar is awarded an office within the lakeside center, a computer and Internet access, library privileges and the friendly support of a community of feminists. The Gannon Center is located on the second floor of Piper Hall. Its location on the northeast side of Chicago offers easy access to public transportation for research work in notable libraries and archives in the area as well as exceptional cultural opportunities. The center has a developing Women and Leadership Archives that may be helpful to some scholars.

WISER (Women in Science Enabling Research)

The WISER program was designed in 1993 to provide undergraduate women at Loyola University Chicago with an introduction to laboratory research, and to create a community of scientists through which undergraduate women could be mentored and encouraged toward careers in the sciences. Students are welcome to participate in and attend lectures, panel discussions, and workshops organized by WISER. Undergraduate students are also invited to apply to the Laura L. Mayer Summer Internship Program as a means of gaining laboratory experience.


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International Center for Research on Women

ICRW's mission is to empower women, advance gender equality and fight poverty in the developing world. To accomplish this, ICRW works with partners to conduct empirical research, build capacity and advocate for evidence-based, practical ways to change policies and programs.

Contact

1120 20th St. N.W.
Washington, DC 20036
Ph. (202) 797-0007
Fx. (202) 797-0020
http://www.icrw.org
info@icrw.org


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Principal Staff

Sarah Degnan Kambou, President

Lyric Thompson, Special Assistant to the President/Policy Advocate

Kristin Fack, Administrative Assistant
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Adolescents

ICRW has been examining the lives of adolescents – especially girls – for more than two decades. Our work focuses on improving their well-being and identifying ways to change deeply entrenched traditional practices that prevent girls and young women from reaching their full potential. We believe that making the abilities, attitudes and options of adolescent girls and boys more equitable is one of the most effective ways to empower women. And our research shows that all aspects of young people’s lives – school, relationships, work, health and marriage – must be addressed in order to bring about lasting social change. Adolescent programs and policies require working with not only girls, but boys, parents, teachers, community members, leaders, schools and employers, too.
 
 
ICRW has been examining for more than 30 years how disparities between women and men affect agricultural productivity and food security. Our research helps development organizations, policymakers and others find practical ways to enhance women’s roles in agricultural production and trade, thereby improving their incomes and livelihoods.

ICRW analyzes the differences between the responsibilities, limitations and interests of male and female farmers to design strategies that provide services, training and incomes. Our findings and recommendations help identify sound approaches that ensure efforts reach women as well as men. Ultimately, we aim to help farmers become competitive participants in the agricultural marketplace and reap the financial benefits.
 
 
Economic development efforts to combat poverty can only succeed if women are part of the solution. Doing so yields a double dividend: When women are economically empowered, they raise healthier, better educated families. Their countries are more economically prosperous because of it, too.

Since our founding more than 30 years ago, ICRW's work has expanded understanding of women's economic contributions as well as the hurdles that prevent them from being successful. Our efforts focus on how gender affects economic development efforts related to assets and property rights as well as employment, enterprise development and financial services.
 
We strive to increase women's ownership, use and control of assets and property. We want to empower women as economic agents and better their ability to access markets on competitive and equitable terms. And with our partners, ICRW aims to integrate gender perspectives into program and institution activities. We believe such an approach improves the likelihood that efforts to strengthen women economically are successful.
 
 
ICRW was among the first organizations in the early 1990s to call attention to how gender inequality fueled the transmission of HIV and AIDS among women. Today, ICRW continues to push the AIDS agenda forward. As the global response moves from a focus on crisis management into a sustained, long-term strategy, our work centers around how HIV programs and policies can better serve the needs of women and girls. We work with partners to design, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of programs that strive to reduce women's social and biological vulnerability to HIV. We also aim to weave these programs into existing family planning, reproductive and maternal health services. Ultimately, we strive to influence national policies by guiding governments and others on how to address the role that gender norms play in the prevention, support and treatment of HIV.
 
 
ICRW strives to demonstrate that improved sexual and reproductive health outcomes are pre-conditions for achieving gender equality, empowering women and reducing global poverty. ICRW’s research in this area aims to build a sound evidence base to inform programs and policies by defining the fundamental connections between gender, reproductive health and development, highlighting the importance of adolescent transitions to adulthood, analyzing means for facilitating women’s access to safe and effective reproductive control options, and undertaking rigorous evaluations to demonstrate what works.
 
Our approach examines how gender equality is both a determinant and a consequence of demographic change. For example, our current research suggests that as fertility rates decline in developing countries, women gain increased access to higher education and formal employment opportunities. This in turn can facilitate more transformative shifts in gender relations. Findings such as these bolster the policy directive that advancing women’s and girls’ reproductive health creates conditions that improve the quality of life for individuals, families, communities and nations.
 
 
ICRW employs a multifaceted approach to reducing violence against women. We conduct empirical research to better understand the incidence of violence, costs associated with it and factors that lead to it. We also are building evidence on interventions designed to prevent violence against women, particularly comprehensive approaches that include economically empowering women, involving boys and men, protecting survivors of violence and rehabilitating men who are abusive. ICRW is examining the policy dimensions of violence prevention by evaluating the impact of and challenges to existing legislation and using our findings to advocate for stronger, more effective laws. Finally, ICRW participates in strategic regional and global networks that work to strengthen civil society and advance the field of preventing violence against women.

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Reports & Resources

For all publications, click here.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Click here for current employment opportunities.


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Girl Scouts of the USA

Founded in 1912, the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), has long been preparing girls for leadership roles. As the largest voluntary organization for girls in the world, the Girl Scouts are committed to peaking the interest and listening to the voices of millions of girls, as well as the women and men who serve them. The purpose of Girl Scouting is to inspire girls with the highest ideals of character and conduct, so that they may become capable and inspired citizens. Girl Scouting seeks to accomplish this goal through innovative programs that provide girls with opportunities to explore the world's possibilities while having fun with their peers in supportive, all-girl settings.

Contact

420 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10018-2798
Ph. (212) 852-8000 / 1 800 478-7248
Fx. (212) 852-6509/6510
http://www.girlscouts.org



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Principal Staff

Anna Maria Chávez, CEO

Connie L. Lindsey, Chair of the National Board of Directors

Nhadine Leung, Chief of Staff

Delphia York Duckens, Senior Vice President, Fund Development

Jaclyn E. Libowitz, Chief of Staff

Florence Corsello, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Business Services

Danny Boockvar, Chief Customer Officer, Girl Scouts of the USA

Deb Taft, Chief Development Officer, Girl Scouts of the USA

Michael Watson, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Girl Scouts of the USA
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The National Program Portfolio

The National Program Portfolio has two main parts – the National Leadership Journeys and the all new The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting. Complemented by the Girl Scout Cookie program, Girl Scout travel and Girl Scout awards, the National Program Portfolio is designed to help girls develop as leaders and build confidence by learning new skills. It also ensures that Girl Scouts at every level are sharing a powerful, national experience—girls together changing the world!

Journeys

On every Leadership Journey, everything girls do—whether it's performing science experiments, creating art projects, cooking simple meals, or learning to protect the planet's water supply—is aimed at giving them the benefits of the Girl Scout "Keys to Leadership": Discover, Connect, Take Action.

Girl's Guide

Everyone knows that Girl Scouts have badges. But The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting has more than just exciting, new badges for every age level. Each guide contains: 

-A colorful, easy-to-use binder specially designed for girls at each level. The binder comes chock full of essential information and badge activities—plus girls get to customize their own experience by choosing and adding in additional badge sets.

-Legacy, Financial Literacy, and Cookie Business badge activities—or, for Girl Scout Daisies, petal and leaf activities. For more information about the National Proficiency badges, check out How the National Girl Scout Program Portfolio Works.

-A detailed diagram showing where girls place the badges, pins, or awards with pride on their vests or sashes.
Ideas to help girls tie their badges right into their Journeys.
 
-Vintage illustrations and quotes from Girl Scout history to help girls feel connected to the proud traditions of the past.
An awards log showing girls every award and badge available at their level, as well as the entire badge program at every level, so girls can see how their skills will grow in Girl Scouting.
 
Highest Awards
 
We know you want to do good things for the world. Help the people who need it most. Protect animals that can't speak for themselves. Treat the environment with the respect it deserves. We know you have great ideas, ones that make a lasting difference. And that you're more than ready to work hard to put those ideas into motion. Girl Scouting's highest awards—the Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards—are your chance to make a lasting difference in your community . . . and in the larger world. Click below. And start changing the world today!
 
Travel
 
Every girl deserves a chance to see the world. Girl Scouts offers many different travel opportunities so girls can see new places, meet new people, and learn about different cultures and ideas. Whether exploring their own neighborhoods, going on overnight camping trips, participating in community service projects, or flying to one of the four world centers, Girl Scouts are continually expanding their horizons.
 
Girl Scout Cookies
 
When a Girl Scout sells you cookies, she's building a lifetime of skills and confidence. She learns goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics—aspects essential to leadership, to success, and to life.
By putting her mind and energies to something, a Girl Scout can overcome any challenge. There are no limits. She can be anything. She can do anything.
 
Program Basics
 
Girl Scouts earn badges, hike and camp, participate in the cookie program, and much more. They improve neighborhoods, protect the planet, design robots, and establish sports clinics. See what a great Girl Scout year can look like for each grade level by visiting Girl Scout GPS!
 
Girl Scout program starts girls off on a Journey of their choice from the National Leadership Journeys series. They'll earn awards, have fun, and take on projects that change the world.
 
Girls then add The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting to their program portfolio. TheGirl's Guide offers girls national proficiency badges, traditions and history, an awards log, and much more. Let Brownie Elf walk you through a fun video (below) describing the Girl's Guide. For complete information about what girls from kindergarten through high school do in Girl Scouts and the awards they can earn, please see the main Program page.

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Reports & Resources

 
While lack of financial literacy is a growing concern for everyone today, relatively little research has been done on how young people think about and experience money and finances, with even fewer studies focusing on girls specifically. To address this gap, the Girl Scout Research Institute conducted a nationwide survey with over 1,000 girls ages 8−17 and their parents to better understand girls' level of financial literacy and their confidence about, attitudes towards, and experiences with money. Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy reveals that girls need and want financial literacy skills to help them achieve their dreams, with 90 percent saying it is important for them to learn how to manage money. However, just 12 percent of girls surveyed feel "very confident" making financial decisions.

Financial Literacy

Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy (2013)

Girls and Media

The Net Effect: Girls and New Media (2002)

Beauty Redefined: Girls and Body Image Survey (2010)

Who's That Girl: Image and Social Media Survey (2010)

Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV (2011)

Girl Leadership, Beliefs, and Values

The Resilience Factor: A Key to Leadership in African American and Hispanic Girls (2011)

Good Intentions: The Beliefs and Values of Teens and Tweens Today (2009)

Transforming Leadership Continued (2009)

The New Leadership Landscape: What Girls Say About Election 2008 (2009)

Transforming Leadership: Focusing on Outcomes of the New Girl Scout Leadership Experience (2008)

Change It Up! What Girls Say About Redefining Leadership (2008)

Exploring Girls' Leadership (2007)

Girl Scouts Survey on The Beliefs and Moral Values of America's Children (1989)

Girl and Youth Development

Paths to Positive Youth Development (2003)

The Ten Emerging Truths: New Directions for Girls 11-17 (2002)

Snapshots of Young Lives Today (2001)

Healthy Living

Beauty Redefined: Girls and Body Image Survey (2010)

The New Normal? What Girls Say About Healthy Living (2006)

Weighing In: Helping Girls Be Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow (2004)

Feeling Safe: What Girls Say (2003)

How America's Youth Are Faring Since September 11th (2002)

Teens Before Their Time (2000)

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (2012)

The Net Effect: Girls and New Media (2002)

The Girl Difference: Short-Circuiting the Myth of the Technophobic Girl (2001)

Volunteerism

Voices of Volunteers 18-29 (2003)

The Community Connection: Volunteer Trends in a Changing World (2002)

National Profile of Adults in Girl Scouting: Executive Summary (1998)

Girl Scout Outcomes

Linking Leadership to Academic Success: The Girl Scout Difference (2012)

Mapping the Girl Scout Leadership Experience Outcomes to the Search Institute's Youth Developmental Assets(2012)

Transforming Leadership Continued (2009)**

Transforming Leadership: Focusing on Outcomes of the New Girl Scout Leadership Experience (2008)**

Girl Scouts Beyond Bars Evaluation Report (2008)**

GirlSports Basics National Evaluation (2003)

Junior Girl Scout Group Experience: Outcomes Measurement Guide (2002)

Tool Kit data analysis supplement (2001)

Tool Kit for Measuring Outcomes of Girl Scout Resident Camp (2000)

Girls, Families, and Communities Grow Through Girl Scouting (1997)

Girl Scouting

Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact Study (2012)

Defining Success: American Women, Achievement, and the Girl Scouts (1999)

National Profile of Adults in Girl Scouting: Executive Summary (1998)

Strength in Diversity: Toward a Broader Understanding of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Girl Scouting: Final Report (1994)

The Girl Scout Experience Among Young Girls Today: Towards a Marketing Strategy for Girl Scouting (1992)

Girl Scouts: Its Role in the Lives of American Women of Distinction (1991)

Girl Scouts: Who We Are, What We Think (1990)


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Center News

Center for Entrepreneurial Women’s Leadership

The Center for Entrepreneurial Women's Leadership at Babson College is dedicated to advancing enterprising women at all stages of their professional development and helping the organizations they work in achieve a competitive advantage through leveraging the talents of an increasingly gender diverse work force.

Contact

231 Forest Street
Babson Park, MA 02457-0310
Ph. (781) 239-5001/(781) 235-1200
Fx. (781) 239-5702
http://www.babson.edu/cwl
cwl@babson.edu


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Principal Staff

Susan Duffy, Executive Director

Majorie Feld, Faculty Director

Joan Whalen, Coordinator
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Real Women, Real Stories

Innovators. Change makers. Boundary breakers and visionaries. The women of Babson live Entrepreneurial Thought and Action® daily. Whether students, faculty, staff, alumni or friends of the college, Babson community members are leading the way to a more prosperous, sustainable and lively way of doing business as women leaders.


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Reports & Resources

Married Professional Women’s Career Exit: Integrating Identity and Social Networks

CWL Newsletter: This monthly newsletter is available for online subscription at http://www.babson.edu/cwl/newsletter. It includes information about upcoming events, research, and Center news.

CWL and The Commonwealth Institute. The Top Woman-Led Businesses in Massachusetts: 2008 Critical Issues Survey.

Allen, I. Elaine, PhD, Nan Langowitz DBA, and Maria Minniti, PhD. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) 2006 Report on Women and Entrepreneurship. 


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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Grants and Scholarships

The Center sponsors the Women's Leadership Program for high-potential women in Babson's top-ranked undergraduate and MBA programs. Women's Leadership students receive enriched mentoring and learning opportunities designed to enhance their leadership skills and career readiness. Women accepted into the program at the point of admission to Babson College are also supported through a scholarship award.
 
 
There are plenty of opportunities to help with the Center for Women's Leadership at Babson College. The personal touch of involvement directly impacts the education experience for Babson and its students. Volunteers are needed to help with interviewing candidates for Women's Leadership scholarships, mentoring students in the Women's Leadership program, and assisting these students in their career development. Providing internships and employment opportunities is another way to help with this important initiative.

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Center for Women in Government & Civil Society

The Vision of the Center for Women in Government & Civil Society (CWGCS) is a world where women and men of all backgrounds participate equally in shaping the future.
 
CWGCS seeks to deepen and broaden political access and economic opportunities for women by strengthening the capacity of government, nonprofit and business sectors to implement gender-responsive, inclusive and equitable policies, practices and services
 
The Center for Women in Government & Civil Society is part of the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy.

Contact

135 Western Ave.
Albany, NY 12222
Ph. (518) 442-3900
Fx. (518) 442-3877
http://www.cwig.albany.edu
cwgcs@uamail.albany.edu


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Principal Staff

Dina Refki, Executive Director
Ph. (518) 442-5127
E-mail: drefki@albany.edu

Diana Abbas, Senior Research Aide
E-mail: dabbas@albany.edu

Amy Barasch, Esp., Senior Research Associate
E-mail: abarasch@albany.edu

Bonnie Beard, Program Director
E-mail: bbeard@albany.edu

Cara Long, Deputy Director
E-mail: clong@albany.edu

Abigya Eshete, Project Coordinator
E-mail: cwgcs@albany.edu

Sue Faerman, Academic Chair of the Women's Leadership Academy and Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
E-mail: sfaerman@albany.edu

Judith Saidel, Senior Research Associate
E-mail: saidel@albany.edu
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The Entrepreneurship Option for Low-Income Teenage Girls
 
CWIG is currently working on a proposal to start a research-based entrepreneurship program for low-income girls who are at risk for not completing high school. Research will target African-American and Latina women who are entrepreneurs, as well as take into account the perspectives of female entrepreneurs from all backgrounds. Project participants will join researchers at the college level in all levels of curriculum development and research phases. This project is being conducted with the Liberty Partnership Project.
 
Nonprofit Education Initiative
 
The Nonprofit Education Initiative (NEI) is a four-year collaborative undertaking that involves nonprofits working on issues related to women, children, and families; regional voluntary sector leaders; and government policymakers and business representatives. The NEI will advance collaborative learning among nonprofit leaders and managers and strengthen the capacities and leadership of diverse voluntary sector organizations. The goals of the initiative are to strengthen collaboration among statewide associations; build stronger connections between nonprofits and the communities and universities they serve; increase the competencies and capacities of statewide nonprofits; and strengthen the technological capacity and competence of consortium members.
 
Completing the Public Record: Appointed Policy Makers in State Government
 
CWIG is conducting work on demographic data on top-ranking gubernatorial appointees. In related research, the center is also studying policy priorities and influences on agenda-setting by the executive branch department heads. Both quantitative and interview data will be used to analyze 35 women and men bureaucratic leaders in eight states. Nontraditional Employment for Women study.
 
Liberty Partnership Project
 
A prevention program aimed at young women and men in grades 7-12 who are at risk for leaving school before graduation. The project offers a range of services to support people in obtaining their diploma, entering higher education, and preparing themselves for the workforce. The program is designed to address academic, personal, and social growth through a focus on the following: educational achievement; self-empowerment; workforce preparation and career exploration; and public policy leadership development.

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Reports & Resources

Women in Federal and State-Level Judgeships (2010).

Glass Ceiling in Gubernatorial Appointments, 1997-2007 (2008).

Appointed Policy Makers in State Government: Single-State Profile (1998).

Appointed Policy Makers in State Government: Pre-Election Update (1998).


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Fellowship on Women & Public Policy

The Fellowship experience blends theory with practice through direct policy field placement, academic coursework, professional development sessions, conferences, and community service activities. Fellows are provided with opportunities to gain specific skills and develop an extensive network of people working in their subject area as well as related professional arenas. 
The program runs annually from mid-January through the end of June. Participants are selected on a competitive basis based on academic achievement and work / life experience. 
 
A highly intensive program, Fellows are required to work thirty hours each week at their placement office, Monday -Thursday. In addition, the program includes: 3 graduate courses (Tuesday and Thursday evening and one independent research) and professional development every Friday throughout the course of the Fellowship. 
Fellows receive a $10,000 stipend, tuition waivers and receive nine graduate credits from the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy, University at Albany, SUNY.

 


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