Women & Immigration: Improving Policy & Lives

Date/Time: 
02/24/2011


        


Honoring the 100th Anniversary of International Women's Day

Immigrant women make enormous contributions to U.S. society and face a number of intense challenges that are under-recognized in discussions and debate on immigration reform. Honoring the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day, this forum will bring together leading activists, policy makers, and researchers from across the country to discuss strategies for addressing women immigrants' unique concerns, including a lack of access to child care, health care and education, and disproportionate exposure to harassment and violence.

Discussion Moderators:

  • Jane Henrici and Cynthia Hess, IWPR Study Directors
  • Tova Wang, Demos Senior Democracy Fellow


Keynote Speaker:

Mee Moua, Vice President of Strategic Impact Initiatives at the Asian and Pacific Islander American Health  Forum. As a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, Moua was the first Hmong American elected to a state legislature in the U.S.

Speakers:

  • Elizabeth Barajas-Román, Director of Policy, National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health and Steering Committee member of the National Coalition for Immigrant Women's Rights
  • Michelle Brané, Director of the Detention and Asylum Program, the Women's Refugee Commission
  • Julissa Ferreras, New York City Council Member, Queens District 21 and Chair of the Council's Women's Issues Committee
  • Rachel Micah-Jones, Executive Director, Centro de los Derechos del Migrante
  • Margie McHugh, Co-Director, National Center on, Immigrant Integration Policy, Migration Policy Institute
  • Remziya Suleyman, Policy Coordinator, Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition
  • Representative, National Domestic Workers Alliance (invited)

Date: Tuesday, March 8, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Location: George Washington University's Marvin Center, Room 309
                  800 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Women's Policy Research, Dēmos, Heinirch Böll Stiftung, and the George Washington University Women's Studies Program.

For more information, click here.