Women's & Girls' Leadership

From prime ministers to grass roots organizers, women and girls are attaining leadership positions in increasing numbers across government, civil society and the economy. But the glass ceiling is still firmly in place in many countries including in the US, where women are still vastly under-represented in government and senior leadership positions.

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Re:Gender Resources

Member Organizations

Resources

Blog Posts

Wendy Davis, the over-night liberal and feminist superstar, has pink sneakers. Did you know this fact? Of course you did.
*By Áine Duggan*In his recent  LinkedIn post, PricewaterhouseCooper’s (PwC) Bob Moritz, Chairman and Senior Partner, shares steps...
By Natasha Cline-Thomas*Each year, NCRW hosts an expert roundtable on the afternoon of its Awards Dinner. This year’s program Women 2012:...
At a stellar gathering of leaders from business, philanthropy, government, and non-profits, the National Council for Research on Women will kick off...

News

  • February 4, 2012

     Reuters asked Donna J. Kelley, a Babson associate professor of entrepreneurship and one of the GEM Women's 2010 report's lead authors, for a bit of insight about U.S. women and small business.


  • January 30, 2012

     Wisconsin has never sent a woman to the U.S. Senate or elected a female governor, and just more than a quarter of the seats in the state Legislature are held by women.

    Emerge Wisconsin is working to change that.


  • January 30, 2012

     The roster of congressional candidates for this year's elections is taking shape and one trend is emerging: 2012 could be another "Year of the Woman" in American politics.


  • January 26, 2012

     In 2011, women held 7.5% of executive officer top earner positions at Fortune 500 companies and a miniscule 3.6% of those firms have women as CEOs. According to a study by Pax World, Calvert and Walden Asset Management, a paltry 9.4% of...


  • January 26, 2012

    In the wake of online discussions about The New York Times coverage, or lack thereof, of female authors, Eugenia Williamson finds that public radio is worse: NPR and WBUR talked about male writers about 70 percent of the time.