Business & Entrepreneurship

The largest companies in the U.S. – those with gross annual revenues of at least $20 billion – report a larger representation of women and other underrepresented groups on their boards of directors. Seventy percent have at least two women and 53 percent have two or more directors from underrepresented groups. Women managers, however, are increasingly opting out of high-end careers when companies fail to meet their professional needs and goals. Fewer than 15 percent of Fortune 500 officers and directors are women, and graduate business schools (unlike law and medical schools) have far fewer women than men applicants. NCRW is supporting efforts to make the corporate environment more welcoming and the career ladder more accessible to women and people of color.

Re:Gender Resources

Member Organizations

Resources

Blog Posts

Did you know that women are more likely to face negative social consequences for negotiating?  This seems to go against the pervasive...
*By Áine Duggan*In his recent  LinkedIn post, PricewaterhouseCooper’s (PwC) Bob Moritz, Chairman and Senior Partner, shares steps...
By Linda Basch, PhD*On Wednesday, I attended the 2011 Breakfast of Champions for an overflow audience at the New York Stock Exchange organized by the...
We at the National Council for Research on Women were excited to participate in the Women Funding Network’s webinar “Investing with a...
Later this afternoon, NCRW President Linda Basch will giving remarks at the Women's Funding Network conference, The Power of Global Networks, on the...

News

  • November 5, 2009

    A new mutual fund buys stock in companies managed by women and donates profits to good causes. But is this any way to make investments?


  • October 19, 2009

    Hedge funds run by women fall half as much during financial crisis as those managed by men, research shows


  • September 22, 2009

    It has been one year since the collapse of Lehman Brother and the ensuing economic crisis that forever changed Wall Street. A recent report by the National Council for Research on Women examined whether the meltdown would have been less severe if more...


  • September 10, 2009

    As financial firms continue to face severe setbacks as result of the weakened economy, Kelly Wallace reports that corporations headed by women are performing slightly stronger than those run by men.


  • August 8, 2009

    Re “No Doubts: Women Are Better Managers” (Corner Office, July 26), in which Carol Smith of the Elle Group described women’s qualities as bosses: