Business & Entrepreneurship

The largest companies in the U.S. – those with gross annual revenues of at least $20 billion – report a larger representation of women and other underrepresented groups on their boards of directors. Seventy percent have at least two women and 53 percent have two or more directors from underrepresented groups. Women managers, however, are increasingly opting out of high-end careers when companies fail to meet their professional needs and goals. Fewer than 15 percent of Fortune 500 officers and directors are women, and graduate business schools (unlike law and medical schools) have far fewer women than men applicants. NCRW is supporting efforts to make the corporate environment more welcoming and the career ladder more accessible to women and people of color.

Re:Gender Resources

Member Organizations

Resources

Blog Posts

Did you know that women are more likely to face negative social consequences for negotiating?  This seems to go against the pervasive...
*By Áine Duggan*In his recent  LinkedIn post, PricewaterhouseCooper’s (PwC) Bob Moritz, Chairman and Senior Partner, shares steps...
By Linda Basch, PhD*On Wednesday, I attended the 2011 Breakfast of Champions for an overflow audience at the New York Stock Exchange organized by the...
We at the National Council for Research on Women were excited to participate in the Women Funding Network’s webinar “Investing with a...
Later this afternoon, NCRW President Linda Basch will giving remarks at the Women's Funding Network conference, The Power of Global Networks, on the...

News

  • March 7, 2012

     Frustrated that her previous efforts to get more women into the top echelons of European business have not yielded stronger results, Viviane Reding, the senior justice official in the European Union, was to announce a new effort Monday that...


  • March 6, 2012

     The European Commission has moved one step closer to imposing quotas on companies to increase the number of women in boardrooms.


  • February 24, 2012

     Aileen Lee argues that by adding new blood to the boardroom, companies get a four-fer, or more: 1) gender diversity, and in most cases, age diversity around the table; 2) better understanding of core customers; 3) Social-Mobile-Local...


  • February 15, 2012

     Despite a quota system to boost female participitation, the gender imbalance is still heavily skewed towards men


  • February 11, 2012

     Letter to the editor by Linda Basch, Ph.D., president of the National Council for Research on Women, regarding Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and the lack of women on corporate boards like Facebook's.