Business & Entrepreneurship

Flexible work arrangements and policies that address caregiving roles result in paybacks for both employers and employees. Research shows that employees with a satisfying work/life balance are more productive, creative, innovative and motivated at work and are less likely to leave their positions. Flexibility also encourages gender diversity in the workplace by easing the way for women to stay on their chosen career tracks while providing caregiving to children and family members or pursuing other interests and responsibilities.

Re:Gender Resources

Reports & Publications

Member Organizations

Resources

Blog Posts

By Linda Basch, PhD* This morning, I had the opportunity to hear Véronique Morali, President of the Global Women’s Forum at...
By Jennifer P. Patello*Can it really be that men are experiencing more work-life balance troubles than women? Apparently, as reported in the Families...
*By Kate MeyerLast week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal...
 Working America and the AFL-CIO recently launched the 2010 Ask a Working Woman survey. A similar survey has been done every 2 years, and in...

News

  • March 7, 2012

    The recent controversy over contraception and health insurance has focused on who should pay for the pill. But there is a wealth of economic evidence about the value of the pill – to taxpayers as well as to women in general.

     


  • February 29, 2012

    Lately it seems I can’t have a conversation with a women’s expert without hearing the phrase “opting out.” “Thirty percent of working women will opt out of the workplace during the course of their career,” they tell...


  • February 22, 2012

     As Roman Catholic leaders and government officials clash over the proper role of religion and reproductive health, shifts in health care economics are magnifying the tension. Financially stronger Catholic-sponsored medical centers are...


  • February 21, 2012

     Women are shunning academic careers in math-intensive fields because the lifestyle is incompatible with motherhood, researchers at Cornell University found in a study to be published next month in American Scientist Magazine.


  • February 17, 2012

     Discrimination against caregivers is still a reality in the American workplace.