Economic Development & Security

Women are more likely to be poor than men, both in the United States and across the globe. Female-headed households are more liable to live in poverty. Families headed by single women in the US are more than twice as likely as other families to be poor. The poverty divide is even more dramatic for people of color: in the US, African-American (26.5 percent) and Latina women (23.6 percent) register much higher poverty rates than white women (11.6 percent). Evidence-based, research-driven policies and programs that recognize the diverse realities of poverty and attack its root causes are critical for producing change.

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March 2, 2009 posted by admin It is undeniable that we are facing tough economic times.  In January, the unemployment rate registered 7.6%...
March 2, 2009 posted by admin The 53rd Commission on the Status of Women meetings start today at UN Headquarters in New York and will run until the...
February 25, 2009 posted by admin From Legal Momentum’s perspective, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will do a great deal of good...
February 11, 2009 posted by Shyama Venkateswar     [caption id="" align="alignright" width="298" caption=...
January 23, 2009 posted by Shyama Venkateswar, Kyla Bender-Baird, and Lisa Rast The room was filled to capacity at Demos’ latest panel...

News

  • September 23, 2011

    ”Women’s financial insecurity, as shown by the Census numbers, has many implications, including fewer assets over the lifespan, greater numbers of female elders in poverty, children who are getting a poorer start in life, stress-induced...


  • September 23, 2011

    Ms. Magazine takes a look at the latest poverty numbers and the National Women's Law Center report on women in poverty.

     


  • September 23, 2011

    Ellen Bravo highlights Obama’s Jobs Proposal. She notes that men have gone back to work at three times the rate of women since the official end of the recession. She also highlights women’s heightened vulnerability to changes in Social...


  • September 23, 2011

    Most jobs lost during the recession were middle wage jobs, and those created during and since the recession have been predominantly low wage jobs. The author states the rates of poverty among racial, age, and gender demographics, noting that women are...


  • September 23, 2011

    This updated report from the Institute for Women's Policy Research charts the fluctuation in men’s and women’s employment rates during the recession. It argues that men have been quicker to recover jobs lost while women’s recovery...