Economic Development & Security

Women [and men] today are seeking greater flexibility in their jobs to balance more effectively their work and family responsibilities. Lack of such arrangements often forces women to opt out of pursuing their career goals. When they return to work, women find themselves at a disadvantage in terms of earnings, opportunities and promotions. Employers who adopt more flexibility in the workplace allow women and men to lead more productive and effective lives.

Re:Gender Resources

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Blog Posts

By Melissa StevensonAt the June 22nd brown bag lunch, “Changing Workplace Scheduling as an Anti-Poverty Strategy,” sponsored by Half in...
By Jennifer P. Patello*Can it really be that men are experiencing more work-life balance troubles than women? Apparently, as reported in the Families...
Originally posted on Igniting Change, the Ms. Foundation for Women blog
*By Kate MeyerLast week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal...
This just in!  Eileen Applebaum from the Center for Economic and Policy Research and Ruth  Milkman have released findings from their latest...

News

  • March 8, 2012

    Last month's long overdue hearing by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) revealed that shocking, blatant attacks on working women are going on more than three decades after passage of the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act, which...


  • March 8, 2012

    According to a new study from the Federal Reserve, due to be published shortly, between 1993 and 2006, there was a decline in the workforce of 0.1 percent a year on average in the number of college-educated women, with similarly educated spouses...


  • March 7, 2012

    The recent controversy over contraception and health insurance has focused on who should pay for the pill. But there is a wealth of economic evidence about the value of the pill – to taxpayers as well as to women in general.

     


  • February 29, 2012

    Lately it seems I can’t have a conversation with a women’s expert without hearing the phrase “opting out.” “Thirty percent of working women will opt out of the workplace during the course of their career,” they tell...


  • February 21, 2012

     Women are shunning academic careers in math-intensive fields because the lifestyle is incompatible with motherhood, researchers at Cornell University found in a study to be published next month in American Scientist Magazine.