Economic Development & Security

With women in the US living longer and postponing retirement, whether out of necessity or by choice, many face economic hardship and discrimination. Although illegal in theory, older women may, in practice, be excluded from job or promotional opportunities based on misconceptions about their abilities or customer preferences for youth. Dual discrimination on the job is evidenced by older women being denied access to training programs and being channeled into positions without upward mobility. Retirement benefits are being further eroded by a weakening of organized labor, economic restructuring and budget cutbacks.

Re:Gender Resources

Reports & Publications

Member Organizations

Resources

Blog Posts

This Sunday, bouquets of roses, Hallmark cards, and restaurant reservations will be deployed by citizenry anxious to promote and valorize an ideal...
A recent New York Times editorial states that under the Obama administration the homeless population has remained steady. The American Recovery and...
By Kyla Bender-BairdThe day is finally here! Today is the Economic Security Summit, Reinvesting in Women and Families: Developing an Economy for the...

News

  • July 9, 2012

    USA Today interviews JoAnn Manson, one of the Women's Health Initiative hormone replacement therapy study's lead investigators and a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School

     


  • June 21, 2012

    A first-of-a-kind study published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders finds damaging eating disorders are common among women 50 and older — and 62% of those surveyed say their weight or shape has a negative impact on their...


  • April 4, 2012

     Two economists envision a scary -- and scarily realistic -- future where the working population expands slower and slower, and jobless recoveries are the only recoveries we know


  • April 2, 2012

     On average, raises stop at age 37 for women and age 45 for men. That's according to research by PayScale.com and is based on surveys completed by about 1.5 million people who hold a bachelor's degree or higher.


  • March 11, 2012

     Women work two-thirds of the world's working hours and produce half of the world's food. Yet, women earn only 10 percent of the world's income and own less than 1 percent of the world's property.