Globalization, Human Rights & Security

Through multilateralism, countries work together to establish international standards and norms and to share responsibilities for their application. Organizations such as the United Nations and the World Trade Organization are primary examples of multilateral institutions. Since the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, nine core international human rights treaties have been ratified. These include the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Also known as the international bill of rights for women, CEDAW was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1979. So far, 185 countries have ratified CEDAW, with the United States being one of only eight countries that are not parties to the convention. International human rights agreements such as CEDAW benefit women by protecting their interests across borders and cultures. Governments are required to report regularly to monitoring bodies, and non-governmental organizations often submit dissenting views providing alternative evidence and information on compliance.

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By Shyama Venkateswar, Ph.D.*The National Council for Research on Women participates in the US Civil Society Working Group on Women, Peace, and...
By Martha F. Davis* By itself, CEDAW (the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) is just words. But...
By Alexandra Mazzeo*Yesterday, The Opportunity Agenda and the U.S. Human Rights Network hosted a telebriefing on two key human rights treaties and...
By June Zeitlin*Women’s rights are human rights, and human rights are women’s rights. This is the mantra of CEDAW, the most...

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