Globalization, Human Rights & Security

Through multilateralism, countries work together to establish international standards and norms and to share responsibilities for their application. Organizations such as the United Nations and the World Trade Organization are primary examples of multilateral institutions. Since the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, nine core international human rights treaties have been ratified. These include the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Also known as the international bill of rights for women, CEDAW was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1979. So far, 185 countries have ratified CEDAW, with the United States being one of only eight countries that are not parties to the convention. International human rights agreements such as CEDAW benefit women by protecting their interests across borders and cultures. Governments are required to report regularly to monitoring bodies, and non-governmental organizations often submit dissenting views providing alternative evidence and information on compliance.

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By Allie Bohm*As a colleague recently reminded me, our system of government was developed not to pass laws, but to make change slowly. Take, for...
The United States remains one of only seven countries that have not ratified CEDAW (the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination...
By Margot Baruch* Before CEDAW there was no international legal mechanism in place that called on states to assess gender inequalities in their...
By Linda Tarr-Whelan*NCRW asked leading research and policy expert Linda Tarr-Whelan to weigh in on the status of CEDAW. In addition to her responses...
By Don Kraus*The bumper sticker on my wife’s car reads, “Well-behaved women seldom make history!” I believe proponents of CEDAW,...

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