Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Over the last 30 years, the number of women earning bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in math and science has increased significantly. This success has been largely due to the work of educational institutions, foundations, professional networks and research and advocacy organizations. Yet despite these efforts, a huge gap still exists between the numbers of women and men pursuing advanced studies and careers in science – especially in physics, chemistry, engineering, computer science and technology. Schools, colleges, the technology sector and businesses, as well as other sectors, need to intensify efforts to recruit and retain talented women in STEM fields. Advancement for women not only diversifies the workforce, but also provides gender balance in setting research goals, developing new product lines and enhancing innovative and strategic decision-making.

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Blog Posts

By Rebecca Chaleff*Last Thursday, September 22nd, I went to CUNY Graduate Center’s event, “Women in Science: Negotiating a Successful...
*By Kate MeyerLast week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal...
Female students have long surpassed their male peers in the rates at which they seek higher education. Yet across sectors, women’s...

News

  • April 9, 2010

    Twenty years ago, women were awarded twice as many computer science degrees as they were in 2008. Of course, there are more fields open to women today. But that only explains part of the reason this well-paid, fast-growing field is losing women.

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  • April 5, 2010

    Despite the expansive gender gap in investment management, research suggests that the small universe of women managing assets are dramatically outperforming their benchmarks, most notably in down markets.  This article highlights NCRW's Women in...


  • April 4, 2010

    Women in life sciences research still earn less than their male counterparts, with no obvious explanation for the disparity, researchers found. After accounting for professional characteristics and publication volume, female researchers earned an...


  • April 1, 2010

    For years, researchers have struggled to understand why so many women leave careers in science and engineering. Theories run the gamut, from family-unfriendly work schedules to innate differences between the genders. A new paper by McGill University...


  • March 22, 2010

    New research suggests that technically oriented women could face gender discrimination in their jobs at high-tech firms in part because of mismanaged projects.  Tech firms rely excessively on a "hero mindset" to save runaway coding...