Great Recession

Third Anniversary of the Recovery Shows Job Growth for Women Slowed by Public Sector Job Losses

The deep recession that began in December 2007 and cost nearly 7.5 million jobs was harder on male workers, but the recovery that officially began in June 2009 has been slower for women. After losing ground at the start of the recovery, the pace of the recovery has picked up for women. Three years into the recovery (June 2009 to June 2012), women have gained back 24 percent of the jobs they lost during the recession; men have gained back 39 percent. However, heavy public sector job losses continue to hinder the recovery for both women and men, but especially for women: for every 10 private sector jobs women gained in the first three years of the recovery, they lost more than 4 public sector jobs.

 

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/resource/third-anniversary-recovery-shows-job-growth-women-slowed-public-sector-job-losses

Improved Job Growth in January for Both Women and Men: Women Re-Entering the Labor Force, But Men Leaving

 According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the February employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, job growth improved in January with 243,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. In January, women gained 95,000 jobs (almost 40 percent, above their share for the past year) and men gained 148,000.

by Institute for Women's Policy Research (February 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/improved-job-growth-in-january-for-both-women-and-men-women-re-entering-the-labor-force-but-men-leaving

Is the Recovery Starting for Women? Slow Job Growth in October for Both Women and Men

Job growth slowed in October with 80,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls. This is down from 104,000 new jobs in August and 158,000 in September. (September’s gains included more than 40,000 Verizon workers returning after a strike. August and September’s totals were revised by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in November). Women’s employment now appears to be rising. In October women gained 66,000 jobs, but men gained only 14,000. The revised numbers for August and September show 136,000 new jobs for women compared with 126,000 for men.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/is-the-recovery-starting-for-women-slow-job-growth-in-october-for-both-women-and-men/at_download/file

Modest Recovery Largely Leaves Women Behind

The deep recession that began in December 2007 cost workers nearly 7.5 million jobs before it officially ended in June 2009. Overall job growth during the recovery has been weak; the economy added only 841,000 jobs between June 2009 and September 2011. Although unemployment remains high and job growth unacceptably slow for both men and women, it is striking that women have actually lost jobs during the recovery.

 

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/resource/modest-recovery-largely-leaves-women-behind

Women and Men Living on the Edge: Economic Insecurity After the Great Recession

The IWPR/Rockefeller Survey of Economic Security, like several other recent surveys, finds that the effects of the 2007–2009 recession, known as the Great Recession, are both broad and deep. The IWPR/Rockefeller survey shows that more than one and a half years after the recession came to an official end, and the recovery supposedly began, many women and men report that they are still suffering significant hardships. They are having difficulty paying for basics like food (26 million women and 15 million men), health care (46 million women and 34 million men), rent or mortgage (32 million women and 25 million men), transportation (37 million women and 28 million men), utility bills (41 million women and 27 million men), and they have difficulty saving for the future (65 million women and 53 million men). On almost every measure of insecurity and hardship the survey reveals the Great Recession has visited more hardship on women than it has on men.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/women-and-men-living-on-the-edge-economic-insecurity-after-the-great-recession

Retirement on the Edge: Women, Men, and Economic Insecurity After the Great Recession

The Great Recession dramatically altered the lives of many Americans, creating pronounced economic stress and uncertainty for both individuals and families. Even after the recession was officially declared over, unemployment levels remained persistently high, while housing values remained notably low. These circumstances led the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) to develop and analyze the IWPR/Rockefeller Survey of Economic Security, which was administered to 2,746 adults aged 18 and older between September and November 2010. The sample for the survey was stratified to yield approximately equal numbers of white, black, and Hispanic respondents, with results weighted by American Community Survey data to reflect the non-institutional, adult population of the nation.
URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/retirement-on-the-edge-women-men-and-economic-insecurity-after-the-great-recession/
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