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Women 2012: Taking a Worldwide Reading

Women 2012: Taking a Worldwide Reading  on Tuesday, March 6th, at Federal Reserve Bank of New York. To read the event press release, click here. Photos by Don Pollard for NCRW. CLICK ON FIRST PHOTO to activate slideshow.

Women 2012: Good News on Health and Education Bad News on Pay and Clout

By Natasha Cline-Thomas*

Each year, NCRW hosts an expert roundtable on the afternoon of its Awards Dinner. This year’s program Women 2012: Taking a Worldwide Reading was enlightening. It featured four leading experts who discussed findings from major national and global status reports on women and gender equality. They were: Iris Bohnet, Academic Dean, Professor of Public Policy, Director of the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School; Jeni Klugman, Director, Gender and Development, World Bank; Racquel Russell, Special Assistant to the President for Mobility and Opportunity, White House Domestic Policy Council; and Saadia Zahidi, Co-Author, World Economic Forum Gender Gap Report. Pat Mitchell, President and CEO, The Paley Center for Media moderated.


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An Unforgettable Celebration with Stellar Women Leaders

By Natasha Cline-Thomas*


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Stellar Honorees -- NCRW Celebrates 30th Anniversary March 6th

At a stellar gathering of leaders from business, philanthropy, government, and non-profits, the National Council for Research on Women will kick off 30 years of transforming the way the world looks at women and girls at its annual Making a Difference for Women Awards Dinner on Tuesday, March 6th.
            The Council will honor: Beth Brooke of Ernst & Young; Abigail Disney, Pamela Hogan, and Gini Retiker of the Women, War & Peace series on PBS; Anita Hill of Brandeis University; and Soledad O’Brien of CNN at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City.


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Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership

NCRW held an expert panel on February 28, 2011 at American Express with senior leaders from business, government, and academia to explore the case for, barriers to, and action steps needed to expand the number of women in leadership positions. While many overt barriers to women’s advancement have been largely dismantled, and the pipeline to leadership is filled with highly qualified women, the embedded prejudices in our institutions and culture as well as the expectations women have for their professional and personal lives, especially younger women, still pose challenges.

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