Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Confronting Contradictions: Exploring the Tensions of Women as Breadwinners

URL: 
http://www.simmons.edu/som/docs/insights_36.pdf
Member Organization: 

Policy in Action: New Jersey's Family Leave Insurance Program at Age Three

See: Policy in Action: New Jersey's Family Leave Insurance Program at Age Three

FromCenter for Women and Work at Rutgers University

Authors: Karen White, Linda Houser, and Elizabeth Nisbet

Date Published: January 2013

 

Teaser: 
New Jersey took a strong step forward in May 2008, when Family Leave Insurance (FLI) was signed into law. The legislation provides eligible workers up to six weeks of partial wage replacement when they need to take time to bond with a new child or care for a seriously ill family member.

Policy in Action: New Jersey's Family Leave Insurance Program at Age Three

URL: 
http://www.njtimetocare.com/sites/default/files/FLI%20Report%201-31%20release%202-5-13%20posted.pdf
Member Organization: 

Making Care Count: A Century of Gender, Race, and Paid Care Work

See: Making Care Count: A Century of Gender, Race, and Paid Care Work

FromCenter for Women and Work at University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Author: Mignon Duffy

Date Published: February 12, 2011

 

Teaser: 

There are fundamental tasks common to every society: children have to be raised, homes need to be cleaned, meals need to be prepared, and people who are elderly, ill, or disabled need care. Day in, day out, these responsibilities can involve both monotonous drudgery and untold rewards for those performing them, whether they are family members, friends, or paid workers. 

Making Care Count: A Century of Gender, Race, and Paid Care Work

There are fundamental tasks common to every society: children have to be raised, homes need to be cleaned, meals need to be prepared, and people who are elderly, ill, or disabled need care. Day in, day out, these responsibilities can involve both monotonous drudgery and untold rewards for those performing them, whether they are family members, friends, or paid workers. These are jobs that cannot be outsourced, because they involve the most intimate spaces of our everyday lives--our homes, our bodies, and our families.

URL: 
http://books.google.com/books/about/Making_Care_Count.html?id=3qCRU8opmRAC
Member Organization: 

Gender-Specific Measures of Economic Conditions and Child Abuse

See: Gender-Specific Measures of Economic Conditions and Child Abuse

FromCenter for the Study of Women in Society at University of Oregon

Author: Jason Lindo

Date Published: Spring 2013

Teaser: 

The steady decline in rates of child abuse in the United States over the past two decades presents something of a puzzle for researchers. A huge literature spanning several disciplines suggests that poverty is a key determinant of abuse. Yet there hasn't been even a slight uptick in rates of abuse during either of the most recent recessions, despite substantial increases in poverty. 

Gender-Specific Measures of Economic Conditions and Child Abuse

URL: 
http://csws.uoregon.edu/wp-content/docs/publications/ResearchMatters/Spring_13_CSWS_RM_Lindo.pdf

When Grandmothers Are Mothers, Too

This Sunday, bouquets of roses, Hallmark cards, and restaurant reservations will be deployed by citizenry anxious to promote and valorize an ideal Mother.  But what if you are a “mother” operating outside of the normative, mainstream designation? Is there a prize for you, too?

We could ask the thousands of grandmothers doing double duty as mothers while their daughters (or sons) serve time in prison. Jessica Dixon Weaver, a lawyer and legal scholar at Southern Methodist University, has spent considerable time exploring this version of mother, particularly in African American communities shaped by mass incarceration over the last 30 years.


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Great Gifts for Mothers of Young Children: Quality, Accessible, Affordable Early Care and Education

Quality early care and education are truly a gifts that will keep on giving, not only to mothers, but to all of us.  We’re not saying that it’s only important to mothers; fathers need and want this too.  However, there has been much research on its impact on mothers, especially single mothers.  According to the Center for American Progress, “...although mothers are now the primary breadwinners or co-breadwinners in nearly two-thirds of American households with children, women spend more than twice as much time as men providing primary care to children.


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Why Negotiation is Only Part of the Solution

Did you know that women are more likely to face negative social consequences for negotiating?  This seems to go against the pervasive notion that women effectively negotiating for high salaries will be a magic bullet for closing the wage gap.  According to Hannah Riley Bowles, Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and Linda Babcock, Carnegie Mellon University, in their article How Can Women Escape the Compensation Negotiation Dilemma? Relational Accounts Are One Answer, “…women entering compensation negotiations face a dilemma: They have to weigh the benefits of negotiating against the social consequences of having negotiated.”


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