Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Beware Those Who Blame Gender Pay Gap On Women's Choices

See:  Beware Those Who Blame Gender Pay Gap On Women's Choices

FromCenter for Gender Studies at Radford University

Author: Hilary Lips

Date Published: April 12, 2011

Teaser: 

It would be wonderful to be able to report that the gender pay gap is disappearing. The data does not support this conclusion, though.

Beware Those Who Blame Gender Pay Gap On Women's Choices

URL: 
http://www.forbes.com/sites/womensmedia/2011/04/12/beware-those-who-blame-womens-choices-for-gender-pay-gap/

Confronting Contradictions: Exploring the Tensions of Women as Breadwinners

See: Confronting Contradictions: Exploring the Tensions of Women as Breadwinners

FromCenter for Gender in Organizations at Simmons School of Management

Date Published: March 2013

Teaser: 

Over the past decade, U.S. women have increasingly taken up the “breadwinner” role in their homes. This shift hasbeen well documented across different groups of women.Today close to 40% of women with children, includingsingle working mothers, are either the sole breadwinner orbring home as much or more than their workingspouse/partner.

Confronting Contradictions: Exploring the Tensions of Women as Breadwinners

URL: 
http://www.simmons.edu/som/docs/insights_36.pdf

Policy in Action: New Jersey's Family Leave Insurance Program at Age Three

See: Policy in Action: New Jersey's Family Leave Insurance Program at Age Three

FromCenter for Women and Work at Rutgers University

Authors: Karen White, Linda Houser, and Elizabeth Nisbet

Date Published: January 2013

 

Teaser: 
New Jersey took a strong step forward in May 2008, when Family Leave Insurance (FLI) was signed into law. The legislation provides eligible workers up to six weeks of partial wage replacement when they need to take time to bond with a new child or care for a seriously ill family member.

Policy in Action: New Jersey's Family Leave Insurance Program at Age Three

URL: 
http://www.njtimetocare.com/sites/default/files/FLI%20Report%201-31%20release%202-5-13%20posted.pdf

Making Care Count: A Century of Gender, Race, and Paid Care Work

See: Making Care Count: A Century of Gender, Race, and Paid Care Work

FromCenter for Women and Work at University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Author: Mignon Duffy

Date Published: February 12, 2011

 

Teaser: 

There are fundamental tasks common to every society: children have to be raised, homes need to be cleaned, meals need to be prepared, and people who are elderly, ill, or disabled need care. Day in, day out, these responsibilities can involve both monotonous drudgery and untold rewards for those performing them, whether they are family members, friends, or paid workers. 

Making Care Count: A Century of Gender, Race, and Paid Care Work

There are fundamental tasks common to every society: children have to be raised, homes need to be cleaned, meals need to be prepared, and people who are elderly, ill, or disabled need care. Day in, day out, these responsibilities can involve both monotonous drudgery and untold rewards for those performing them, whether they are family members, friends, or paid workers. These are jobs that cannot be outsourced, because they involve the most intimate spaces of our everyday lives--our homes, our bodies, and our families.

URL: 
http://books.google.com/books/about/Making_Care_Count.html?id=3qCRU8opmRAC

Gender-Specific Measures of Economic Conditions and Child Abuse

See: Gender-Specific Measures of Economic Conditions and Child Abuse

FromCenter for the Study of Women in Society at University of Oregon

Author: Jason Lindo

Date Published: Spring 2013

Teaser: 

The steady decline in rates of child abuse in the United States over the past two decades presents something of a puzzle for researchers. A huge literature spanning several disciplines suggests that poverty is a key determinant of abuse. Yet there hasn't been even a slight uptick in rates of abuse during either of the most recent recessions, despite substantial increases in poverty. 

Gender-Specific Measures of Economic Conditions and Child Abuse

URL: 
http://csws.uoregon.edu/wp-content/docs/publications/ResearchMatters/Spring_13_CSWS_RM_Lindo.pdf
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