Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Breaking the Social Security Glass Ceiling

The National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare Foundation , the National Organization for Women Foundation and the Institute for Women's Policy Research briefed Congressional staff today on their research examining the challenges facing America 's elderly women and their families. Their report, Breaking the Social Security Glass Ceiling also proposes initiatives to ensure Social Security benefits are adequate for all Americans, particularly for women and women of color.
 
Here are just some of the recommendations in this groundbreaking report:

Women and the Risk of Disability Research: Insights from a Landmark Study by The State Farm® Center for Women and Financial Services at The American College

The majority of Americans lack basic knowledge about the likelihood of a disability and are unprepared to handle this kind of life-changing event. These gaps put families and financial futures in jeopardy, according to a new study released today by The State Farm® Center for Women and Financial Services at The American College.

URL: 
http://womenscenter.theamericancollege.edu/uploads/documents/Women-and-the-Risk-of-Disability-Study-5-4-12-v1a.pdf

What About Women (and Retirement)?

New “Retirement Revealed” data looks at women’s retirement planning and financial situations, with additional insights based on age and marital status, and a special report about women currently raising children.

From the ING Retirement Research Institute

 

URL: 
http://ing.us/rri/content/what-about-women-and-retirement

State of the World's Mothers 2012: Nutrition in the First 1,000 Days

Save the Children’s State of The World's Mothers Report Ranks Niger as the Worst Country in the World to be a Mother

The report shows how low cost solutions like breastfeeding and basic hygiene can save more than 1 million children’s lives each year. Read the report, watch the videos and share info graphics. Then sign our petition to urge World Leaders to support child survival solutions.

URL: 
www.savethechildren.org/world-mothers

Pay Matters: The Positive Economic Impacts of Paid Family Leave for Families, Businesses and the Public

With a growing need for family-friendly workplace policies, a new study commissioned by the National Partnership for Women & Families, with support from the Rockefeller Foundation, concludes that providing paid family leave to workers leads to positive economic outcomes for working families, businesses and the public.
 
The research, conducted by the Center for Women and Work at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, finds that women who use paid leave are far more likely to be working nine to 12 months after a child’s birth than those who do not take any leave.
URL: 
http://smlr.rutgers.edu/paymatters-cwwreport-january2012
Member Organization: 

Gender Segregation in Fields of Study at Community Colleges and Implications for Future Earnings

Postsecondary education yields myriad benefits, including increased earnings potential, higher lifetime wages, and access to quality jobs. But postsecondary degrees are not all equalin the benefits they bring to students and women tend to obtain degrees in fields with lower earnings. Women with associate degrees earn approximately 75 percent of what men with associate degrees earn (U.S. Department of Commerce and the Executive Office of the President, 2011). This wage gap occurs in part because women with AA degrees—like women at all degree levels—often work in lower-paid, female-dominated occupations (Hegewisch, et al. 2010).

by Layla Moughari, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (May 2012)

 

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/gender-segregation-in-fields-of-study-at-community-colleges-and-implications-for-future-earnings
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