Economic Development & Security

Women are active players driving the economy, nationally and globally. They are important breadwinners for their families, grow most of the world’s food and are entering the formal and informal sectors of the labor market in increasing numbers. Despite their enormous contributions, women are still largely absent from leadership positions and their voices and perspectives are often missing from economic policymaking at the local, regional, national and international levels. To promote their wellbeing, women need access to adequate income and quality education to support themselves and their families. Women still earn less than men and make up a disproportionate number of the poor, both nationally and globally. In the United States, women’s wellbeing and advancement depend on their access to basic services, opportunities and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, advanced education, health care and adequate housing. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Study of Rabbinic Compensation by Gender

 This Study of Rabbinic Compensation by Gender is undertaken by the Central Conference of American Rabbis (“CCAR”) as a service to CCAR rabbis and all the congregations, organizations and communities which they serve and in furtherance of the Reform Movement’s long-standing commitment to economic justice.

This study relies upon the data collected in the 2010-2011 Study of Rabbinic Compensation. That study was conducted by an independent actuarial firm, Buck Consulting, LLC, a Xerox Company (“Buck”), with the assistance of the Reform Pension Board (“RPB”), for the CCAR in partnership with the Union for Reform Judaism (“URJ”). Gender material for this study was computed and analyzed by Mayeri Research/The Internet Poll (New York).

This study indicates:

URL: 
http://www.ccarnet.org/media/filer_public/2012/06/20/salary_study_by_gender.pdf

Community College Partnerships for Student and Career Success: Program Profile of Carreras en Salud

Postsecondary students with children often need an array of supports to succeed in their studies, which can require significant coordination among new and existing services (Conway, Blair, and Helmer 2012; Henrici n.d.; Miller, Gault, and Thorman 2011). Such supports might include financial aid, academic and career counseling, job placement assistance, transportation, housing, child care, and classes in English-as-a-Second Language. To more effectively provide an expanded range of student resources, community colleges often partner with local nonprofits, private businesses and foundations, and government institutions (Altstadt 2011; Bragg et al. 2007; Bray, Painter, and Rosen 2011; Conway, Blair, and Helmer 2012; Leutz 2007; Singh 2007; Wilson 2010).

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/community-college-partnerships-for-student-and-career-success-program-profile-of-carreras-en-salud

The Impact of the New York City FY 2013 Executive Budget Proposal on Women, Children and Families

 Developed in collaboration with the Fiscal Policy Institute, the report highlights the disproportionate burden that the Executive Budget proposal places on women, children and families. NYWF hopes that this document will be instrumental in efforts to advance economic security and justice for all in New York City.

URL: 
http://www.nywf.org/pdf/NYWF_FY2013_Gender_Budget_Analysis_NYC.pdf
Member Organization: 

Women and Alzheimer's Disease: The Caregiver's Crisis

 The Working Mother Research Institute surveyed nearly 2,500 women, including more than 1,200 who have cared for a loved one with Alzheimer's, to get a clear picture of how the responsibility of caregiving affects their emotional, financial and work lives, as well as their families.

URL: 
http://www.workingmother.com/research-institute/women-and-alzheimers-disease-caregivers-crisis
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