Education & Education Reform

Women and girls have made substantial progress in educational attainment. Today in the US women receive more than half of all college degrees – and have almost achieved parity with men in advanced degrees in law, medicine and other disciplines. But several gaps persist, and more importantly, disparities remain among diverse women according to race, income, immigrant status and other socio-economic factors. Improving access to quality education for all students including adolescent girls and mothers needs to become a national and global priority. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Effective_Philanthropy

Mary Ellen S. Capek is a Principal in Capek & Associates, a philanthropic and nonprofit research and consulting group based in Corrales, New Mexico, and a Visiting Scholar at the Anderson Schools of Management at the University of New Mexico.

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Organizational Success Through Deep Diversity & Gender Equality (by Mary Ellen Capek, Former Executive Director)

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THE GIRLS REPORT: What We Know & Need to Know About Growing Up Female

"Seven years ago the National Council for Research on Women and its member centers issued major reports on the status of girls in society, in schools, and in youth organizations in the United States. Since then, university researchers and popular writers have focussed attention on girls. The Girls Report is a fresh and timely look at every aspect of life for girls as we look toward the new millenium.

"If the reports in the early 1990s struck a chord of concern and a call to action, the tone of this report is optimism and activism. As we say at Girls Incorporated, girls are strong, smart and bold unless society puts barriers in their way. Lynn Phillips and the National Council staff have captured the strength, the energy, and the possibilities of girls on their way to becoming young women, while calling on the rest of us to be vigilant in supporting girls' high hopes and expectations for their own achievement."

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The Girls Report surveys current studies on girls, mapping theoretical debates, countering popular myths with recent research findings, and highlighting successful programs serving diverse populations. Chapters on education, health, self-esteem, violence, sexuality, and economic realities conclude with clear recommendations for action. A comprehensive bibliography offers resources to educators, researchers, policymakers, and all concerned with increasing opportunities for girls.

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Balancing the Equation: Where are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering, and Technology?

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by NCRW, now Re:Gender network members. Also included are Recommendations, which emphasize that an increase in women and girls' participation in all levels of science, engineering and technology requires strong leadership, changes in cultural values and practices, and systemic reform.

Click here to order a copy.

Teaser: 

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by Re:Gender network members.

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New York University

Founded in 2000, as a part of the Roundtable of Institutions of People of Color, the Women of Color Policy Network, an Affiliate of the Research Center for Leadership in Action at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, NYU is the country's only research and policy group focusing on women of color housed at a nationally ranked top 10 public policy program. The Network conducts original research and collects critical data on women of color that is used to inform public policy outcomes at the local, state, and national levels. The Network also serves as a hub for women of color scholars, leaders, and practitioners.

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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

  • Beyond The Window Summer Youth Public Policy Institute
  • Strategic Conversations in Public Service

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Reports & Resources

  • In the Shadow of the UN: The Global North and South in NYC
  • Making Ends Meet: Women and Poverty in New York City
  • Race, Gender, and the Recession
  • Women Of Color In New York City:Still Invisible In Policy
  • Women of Color in New York City: The Challenges of the New Global Economy
  • Women of Color in New York City and the Millennium Development Goals: The Case for Localization
  • Understanding Client and Occupation Barriers in New York City
  • Race Realities in New York City
  • We Speak: New York City Women Living with HIV/AIDS
  • Third Annual Status of Women of Color Report: Young Women of Color in New York City
  • Gender, Race, Class and Welfare Reform

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Center News

Keeping Women on the Economic Agenda

Last night I attended a dynamic panel hosted by Legal Momentum on Women’s Economic Equality: The Next Frontier in Women’s Rights.  The brilliant panelists duked it out, discussing the current economic situation, its impact on women, and in what directions we should be heading. 


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American University

The Women & Politics Institute advances the study and discussion of women and politics, promotes opportunities for women in politics, and trains young women to become political leaders. The Institute offers Graduate and Undergraduate Certificates in Women, Policy, and Political Leadership (WPPL) that provide students with the opportunity to take courses taught by nationally recognized experts within their fields, to work in career building internships with women’s organizations and in the offices of women members of Congress, and to attend leadership workshops and lectures featuring distinguished women leaders.

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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

  • Graduate and Undergraduate Certificates in Women, Policy and Political Leadership (WPPL) – This 15-credit hour program provides students with the information and skills they need to be involved in issues in women and politics. The program combines traditional courses that provide students with the theoretical and methodological foundation in the study of women and politics in addition to interactive weekend seminars that feature leading experts in the field working on women’s issues.
  • Campaign College: AU Women to Win is the first program in the nation to train college women to run for elected office and to participate in student government on their campus. Campaign College provides students with the necessary skills to be involved in campus politics and hopes to inspire future women candidates for local, state, and national office.
  • WeLEAD: Women bringing women to the power center. Run by the Institute’s Young Women Leaders Board, WeLEAD is the only training in the country that specifically works to increase the number of women working in political professions such as congressional and administrative staffing, campaign consulting, and lobbying, as well as encourages young women to run for office. The Young Women Leaders Board is a bipartisan group of women in their late twenties and early thirties who work in politics and actively mentor the participants in the program.
  • Women As Leaders – Women as Leaders programs provide delegations of international women elected officials, political activists, business leaders, and judges with the opportunity to meet their U.S. counterparts for cross cultural exchanges. Trainings with women judges have included meetings with U.S. Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Other delegations have met with several women members of Congress. These meetings have fostered strategic international cooperation and a better understanding of issues that face women globally.

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Reports & Resources

  • O’Connor, Karen, Sarah E. Brewer, and Michael Philip Fisher. 2006. Gendering American Politics: Perspectives from the Literature. New York: Longman.
  • McGlen, Nancy, Karen O’Connor, Laura van Assendelft and Wendy Gunther Canada. 2004. Women, Politics, and American Society. 4 th Edition. New York: Longman.
  • O’Connor, Karen and Larry Sabato. 2008. American Government: Continuity and Change. 8 th Edition. New York: Longman.
  • O’Connor, Karen. Editor. 2005. Women and Congress: Running, Winning, and Ruling. New York: The Haworth Press, Inc.
  • Brewer, Sarah E. Editor. 2007. Women and Political Leadership Monograph: Perspectives from Men and Women in Politics. Washington, D.C.: Women & Politics Institute.

 


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Center News

Women Leaders Across Sectors on Social Justice and Change

March 3, 2009 posted by Deborah Siegel I’m sitting in a very crowded auditorium at 3 World Financial Center, home of American Express, and the sun is pouring in on one of the coldest days of the year. We’re about to be warmed by the annual panel that takes place the afternoon of the National Council for Research on Women’s evening-time gala, the Making a Difference for Women Awards. This year’s panel, “An Immodest Proposal: Advancing a New Era of Social Justice” (kudos on the title, NCRW!) features Co-President of the National Women’s Law Center Marcia Greenberger, Chancellor and President of Syracuse University Nancy Cantor, Accenture / Microsoft / PepsiCo Director Dina Dublon, and Columbia University law professor and Nation columnist Patricia Williams. The Takeaway co-host Adaora Udoji, whose voice I wake up to each morning, will be moderating. There is nothing modest about this crowd of female movers and shakers from corporate, academic, and nonprofit spheres. The NCRW staff—of which I used to be part—has clearly done an excellent job spreading word. It’s a dazzling lineup. Let the conversation begin! Adaora: First question is for Nancy. What can you tell us about advancing a new era of social justice in education? Nancy: The idea of the ivory tower as a monastic place is breaking down. What that means is we have no understanding of the groups we’re leaving behind. How do we level the playing field of education? If we don’t find ways to strengthen our connections to our communities, cities, rural areas, and bring in the population, we’re going to be stagnant. Adaora: Are we seeing that 50% female leadership in education yet? Nancy: No, not at all. What we are seeing at all levels is girls falling off the map as we go up. Adaora: Why is that?


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GIRLS FORUM: Round-Up

February 13, 2009 posted by Linda Basch Last week we reached out to advocates and scholars working on issues affecting girls’ lives to submit their Girls Agenda 2009: More funding for teen dating violence prevention? More attention paid to the international trafficking of girls? New programs to promote the health, safety, and well-being of future women?  Effective, comprehensive sex education in our schools? The responses we received were dynamic, fresh, and exciting.  Deborah Tolman, Professor of Social Welfare, Hunter College School of Social Work, suggested that in order to enhance girls’ resiliency, we must do more than reduce risk—we must provide encouragement so that they may live their lives in the positive.  Lyn Mikel Brown, author of Girlfighting, offered an insightful critique of the “mean girl” phenomenon and recommended a strength-based approach: “We affirm girls’ relational and political strengths by giving them reason to believe they can count on one another and work together to solve social problems.”  Allison Kimmich, Executive Director of the National Women’s Study Association, drew on Obama’s role as both father and policymaker, nudging him to make policy decisions in the same manner he parents.


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GIRLS FORUM: Lyn Mikel Brown Counters the “Mean Girl” Onslaught with Strength-Based Programs

February 5, 2009 posted by admin As someone who studies girl culture and as a mother of a 13 year old, I can't miss the avalanche of "mean girls" in the media and what it suggests to my daughter; to all our daughters. Can we imagine a girl-targeted reality show, sitcom, or drama that doesn't revolve around a catfight?  Do we really need more movies like Bride Wars or another Jennifer-Angelina magazine cover with an inset of Brad in the corner? It seems like the only public displays of sisterhood we see any more involve girls collectively dissing other "bad" girls or commiserating over break ups with guys. As an education professor, I spend a lot of time in public schools.


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