Education & Education Reform

Women and girls have made substantial progress in educational attainment. Today in the US women receive more than half of all college degrees – and have almost achieved parity with men in advanced degrees in law, medicine and other disciplines. But several gaps persist, and more importantly, disparities remain among diverse women according to race, income, immigrant status and other socio-economic factors. Improving access to quality education for all students including adolescent girls and mothers needs to become a national and global priority. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Women in Science: Degrees and Faculty in Natural & Applied Sciences

 n all scientific fields of study except biological sciences men continue to outnumber women. The fields of physical sciences and computer sciences and engineering show the highest gender disparity. Why does this underrepresentation matter?

Fewer female graduates in scientific higher education translate into fewer women working in scientific research and occupations. For example, at Rutgers, women are only 19.5 percent of tenured and tenure-track science faculty.

URL: 
http://iwl.rutgers.edu/documents/njwomencount/WomeninScienceFactSheet.pdf
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CIRP Surveys and Services

 The Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) contains the well-known and long-running CIRP Freshman Survey and follow up assessments such as the Your First College Year (YFCY) and the College Senior Survey. The UCLA Higher Education Research Institute also administer the HERI Faculty Survey, which examines issues from the faculty standpoint. A variety of data related services based on the results of these surveys are available. Please click on links below to get more information.

URL: 
http://www.heri.ucla.edu/herisurveys.php

Acosta/Carpenter Women in Intercollegiate Sport A Longitudinal, National Study Thirty-Five Year Update: 1977-2012

 In 2012, forty years after the enactment of Title IX, there are an average of 8.73 womenʼs teams per school and a total of about 200,000 female intercollegiate athletes: the highest in history.

In 1970, prior to the 1972 enactment of Title IX, there were only 2.5 womenʼs teams per school and only about 16,000 total female intercollegiate athletes. In 1977/1978, the academic year preceding the mandatory compliance date for Title
IX, the number of varsity sports for women had grown to 5.61 per school.

A decade later, in 1988, the number had grown to 7.71 and at the turn of the century, the growth continued to 8.14.
Today, in 2012, the average number of womenʼs teams per school sets an all time record of 8.73 giving weight to the adage: “If you build it, they will come.”

URL: 
http://acostacarpenter.org/AcostaCarpenter2012.pdf
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