Environment, Sustainability & Energy

Gender is a leading factor for understanding the intersections of the environment, sustainability and energy. The poor (disproportionately women) are at a particular disadvantage from environmental degradation and lack of access to clean water and adequate, affordable energy. Women’s primary role in agricultural production, food preparation and water and fuel collection positions them as vital partners in building and implementing sound environmental policies. Investing in women is one of the most effective ways to advance sustainable development and fight global climate change. The diverse roles and needs of women must be recognized and addressed in programs ranging from rural development to green job creation and urban revitalization. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
38° 15' 9.9648" N, 85° 45' 30.4056" W

Lucinda Marshall is the Director of the Feminist Peace Network (FPN) which she founded in December, 2001 as a virtual ‘room of our own’ where women concerned about how the impending U.S. invasion of Afghanistan (and later Iraq) would impact women’s lives could share their thoughts and ideas for action in a safe, supportive space. While initially focusing on militarism, the network, with participants from around the world, has expanded its vision to also address what Marshall calls the other terrorism, the systemic global pandemic of violence against women.

Location

Louisville, KY
United States
38° 15' 9.9648" N, 85° 45' 30.4056" W

Reconstructing Haiti with Women & Girls at the Center

By Tunisia L. Riley*

On May 4, 2010 I sat in a packed room of women (and a few men) coming together to raise awareness of women and girls efforts in the reconstruction of Haiti after the devastating January 12, 2010 earthquake and its aftershocks. While Haiti has subsided from the headlines of most mainstream media, this assembly of women, which included women from all parts of the African Diaspora, proves Haiti is still on our minds and in our hearts. But the major recurring question of the evening was, now what? What does this room, packed to capacity, full of progressively minded individuals do when we leave here? The forum, with its panel and audience sought to answer that.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Indoor Air May be Hazardous to Women’s Health

By Ruth Schechter

Originally posted April 18, 2010 on GENDER NEWS, from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

 

Vacuuming the carpet, making the bed, cooking dinner, or using room freshener may be hazardous to women’s health. These activities all release potentially harmful allergens and pollutants. However household air pollution is not regulated, putting respiratory health at risk.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Web site for DESA (UN Dept. of Economic & Social Affairs)

The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) addresses global issues including poverty reduction, gender equality, indigenous rights, macroeconomic policy, and development finance.  DESA’s mission - to promote development for all - reflects a fundamental concern for global equity and equality.

DESA's Web site includes fact sheets, articles, and reports on its varied activities and projects around the world.  Gender equality, social development, and sustainable development are among the major topic areas featured on the Web site.

URL: 
http://www.un.org/desa/

Women, Health & the Environment

This special issue of Our Planet, published by the United Nations Environmental Programme, underlines women's unique vulnerability to environment-related health problems, from water and sanitation issues to ones of indoor air pollution.

URL: 
http://www.unep.org/ourplanet/imgversn/152/images/Our_Planet_15.2.pdf

UNDP Resource Guide on Gender & Climate Change

This Resource Guide on Gender and Climate Change presents principal conceptual and methodological advances on gender relations in the context of climate change, with the overall objective of providing guidelines for actors, practitioners and consumers in this relatively new programme area.

URL: 
http://content.undp.org/go/cms-service/download/asset/?asset_id=1854911

Green Jobs: Improving the Climate for Gender Equality, Too

Climate change is not gender neutral.

Women are increasingly being seen as more vulnerable than men to the effects of climate change because they represent the majority of the world’s poor and are proportionally more dependent on threatened natural resources. What is more, women tend to play a greater role than men in natural resource management – farming, planting, protecting and caring for seedlings and small trees – and in ensuring nutrition and as care providers for their families.

 

URL: 
http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---gender/documents/publication/wcms_101505.pdf
Syndicate content