Equality, Diversity & Inclusion

Re:Gender’s work on behalf of women and girls is based on the principle that equality must take into account diversity and inclusion to bring about a society that is more just for all. Diversity includes, but is not limited to, gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, social class, sexual orientation, age, ability and political perspective. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information. For a review of Regender's Diversity & Inclusion Program click here

WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action

By Karen O’Connor*

One need only look to the Declaration of Sentiments adopted by the women in attendance at the Seneca Falls Convention in August 1848 to begin to appreciate how far women in the United States still are from reaching equality in a host of arenas, many of which are dependent on political or legal equality. Although women were granted the franchise in 1920 after decades of struggle, it is only in the past few decades that women have become a political force – at least at the ballot box. Women not only vote more than men, but unmarried women and women of color are much more likely to vote for Democratic candidates. In fact, women were key voters in the successful elections of Presidents Clinton and Obama.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Steps to Political Equality from Gloria Thomas

By Gloria Thomas*

Women will not have achieved political equality until critical societal changes have taken place. First, women’s successes in being elected and appointed to political positions, corporate and non-profit executive leadership roles, as well as significant public and private boards must no longer be an anomaly to demonstrate equality has been accomplished. When we reach this point, there will no longer be a need for organizations like The White House Project to inspire women to run for public office. Nor will there be a need for other leadership programs designed to provide women with the skills and networks necessary to pursue various executive level positions and to provide the staying power to succeed once they are in these roles.


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Center for Research on Women

The mission of the Center for Research on Women (CROW) is to conduct, promote, and disseminate scholarship on women and social inequality.
 
The Center for Research on Women has investigated issues of gender, race, class and social inequality for 30 years. An interdisciplinary unit within the College of Arts & Sciences, this thriving academic center is home to collaborative researchers committed to scholarly excellence and deep community involvement.
 
The Center is regarded as a national leader in promoting an integrative approach to understanding and addressing inequities in our society. The Center's approach to research, theory and programming emphasizes the structural relationships among race, class, gender, and sexuality, particularly in the U.S.

Contact


Memphis, TN 38152-3530
Ph. (901) 678-2770
Fx. (901) 678-3652
http://www.memphis.edu/crow/
crow@memphis.edu
lynda.sagrestano@memphis.edu

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Principal Staff

Lynda M. Sagrestano, Ph.D., Director
Ph. (901) 678-2780
E-mail: lsagrstn@memphis.edu

Lornette Stokes, B.S., Administrative Secretary
Ph. (901) 678-2770
E-mail: lwstokes@memphis.edu

Teresa A. Diener, M.A., Project Coordinator, Community Voice Evaluation
Ph. (901) 678-2293
E-mail: tdiener@memphis.edu

Naketa M. Edney, M.A., Research Associate, Community Voice Evaluation
Ph. (901) 678-2153
E-mail: nedney@memphis.edu

Jennifer Gooch, M.A., Research Associate, Women's Economic Security: Campaign
Ph. (901) 678-2642
E-mail: jgooch@memphis.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Women's Academic Network
The Women's Academic Network provides women on our campus with an informal opportunity to meet new colleagues, socialize, and discuss topics of interest and relevance to women in academia.

Women's Research Forum
The Center invites women scholars to present their work on campus in a public forum.

Memphis Safe Campus Initiative
CROW is conducting research on campus safety, as well as working to prevent and reduce violence against women on the University of Memphis campus.

MemTV is a collaborative effort of over 30 agencies and organizations in the Greater Mid South area who envision a future where all teens are taught comprehensive sex education, teens' onset of sexual intercourse is delayed, teen pregnancies are reduced/eliminated, and teen parents are provided assistance.

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Center News

Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

The Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) at the University of Maryland is an interdisciplinary research center which promotes intersectional scholarship through original research, mentoring, and collaboration. CRGE's work explores the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality as they shape the construction and representation of identities, behavior and complex social relations.

Contact

1208 Cole Field House
College Park, MD 20742
Ph. (301) 405-2931
Fx. (301) 405-2868
http://www.crge.umd.edu
btdill@umd.edu
rzambran@umd.edu

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Principal Staff

Ruth E. Zambrana, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: rzambran@umd.edu

Laura A. Logie, Ph.D., Assistant Director
E-mail: lauraalogie@hotmail.com

Bonnie Thornton Dill, Ph.D., Founding Director, CRGE
E-mail: btdill@umd.edu

Wendy Hall, Program Management Specialist
E-mail: hallw@umd.edu

Beth Douthirt-Cohen, Communications Coordinator
E-mail: bdc1@umd.edu
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Developing Research Studies include:

 
Limited research has been conducted on CVD risk factors and effective interventions among Latinos of Central and South American origin (CSA). Specific aims of this study are to: (1) assess health behaviors, social and psychosocial CVD risk factors among adult Central/South American men and women; (2) examine the associations between psychosocial, social and health behavior cardiovascular risk factors with clinical measurements among adult CSA men and women; and (3) conduct a pilot study with lay health promoters to test the effectiveness of literacy and linguistic appropriate health education using the Model for Improvement to improve CVD risk profiles among CSA adults. A cross-sectional health interview and examination survey of 400 CSA 30-64 year old adults residing in Montgomery County MD will be conducted, followed by an intervention with 30 lay community health promoters. The intervention includes 14 contact points; pre- and post-test instruments will measure effectiveness of the intervention.

Does Stress “Get Under the Skin” Differently By Social Status? Identifying Essential Bio-Social Pathways for Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity
 
 
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the major cause of death in the United States and racial/ethnic minorities have high incidence and prevalence rates compared to other groups in the population. According to the American Heart Association (2009), most recent prevalence rates for CVD were highest for blacks (45%) compared to Whites (33%) and Hispanics make up the largest ethnic group with increasing rates (32%) relative to their representation in the population. Although studies have documented population differences in CVD, the underlying biological and social risk factors that work concomitantly to account for these differences are not well researched or understood. Using secondary data from the 2006 health and Retirement Study Core Data File and Biomarker Supplement, we will examine the association between social status, SES, psycho-social adversities, biomarkers of disease, health status and health behaviors to assess their relationship(s) to CVD morbidity. Our main analytic interest in examining these relationships is to identify essential bio-social pathways of disease vulnerability, the mechanisms that mediate or moderate those relationships and the risk factors that place marginalized minorities (Blacks and Hispanics) at a disadvantage for CVD morbidity at older (50+yrs) rather than younger ages (<25yrs). This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine how social risk factors “get under the skin” differently for status groups in efforts to identify the important distal mechanisms involved that disproportionately increase VCD risk f or Blacks and Hispanics. Implications and outcomes of the study are aimed to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Stress for Success: The Impact of Occupational Stressors on the African American & Latino Professoriate
 
Occupational stress manifests itself in stress-related disorders (physical, mental), poor work performance, reduced productivity and retention of qualified employees in the workforce. This project investigates the relationships between occupational stressors, organizational factors, and moderators to explain variation in the physical and mental health of under-represented minority (URM) men and women faculty. Mixed methods are proposed to test the central hypothesis- URM women faculty will report a higher reported number of physical and mental health conditions than URM men. Data is collected from four sources; 1) survey, 2) focus groups, 3) in-depth interviews, and, 4) review of Curriculum Vitae. The sample will consist of 300 (150 males & 150 females) URM tenure track assistant or tenured associate professors in Research I and II institutions. These data will serve as the baseline for a larger longitudinal study to assess career path and progression over a three year follow-up time period.

Childhood Origins of Health Disparities in Young Adulthood
 
 
The primary objective in the proposed application is to determine the independent and interacting influences of gender, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES) at the family and community level on overweight and health among adolescents and young adults. Our central hypothesis is that social/cultural factors (e.g. preferences and norms) and structural factors (e.g. differential access to resources) interact to explain the disparities in weight status observed across racial/ethnic groups. Our collective experience in research on Hispanic, African American, Asian, and majority health, childhood obesity, the analysis of health outcomes, and our experience with management and analysis of large datasets make us uniquely qualified to conduct this research project.

Differences in Risk Factors by Hypertension Status Among Postmenopausal African American and Latino Women
 
The goal of this study is to investigate how various risk factors, socioeconomic status (SES), psychosocial, and access related factors, mediated by health behaviors and medical history, can increase our understanding of race/ethnic and gender differences in hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive; treated vs. untreated; controlled vs. uncontrolled) and transitions in hypertension status for African American and Latino women ages 50 to79 years. Using secondary data analyses of the Women's' Health Initiative (WHI) for the African American (n=14,618) and Latino (n=6484) subsamples of the Observational Study (OS), Clinical Trials and Extended Study (2005-2010), we will address the risk factors that place racial/ethnic women at risk for critical levels of hypertension. Our main analytic interest in comparing hypertension status at baseline and transitions of hypertension status in subsequent years is to capture how risk factors can accumulate and exacerbate health conditions over time. Specifically, this study 1) examines the association between SES, psychosocial, and access factors with hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive) and transitions in status and tests whether the associations are mediated by medical history and health behaviors among African American and Latino women, 2) assesses the underlying factors contributing to differences in two indicators of hypertension status a) treated vs. untreated hypertensives and b) controlled vs. uncontrolled hypertension status and transitions in status among African American and Latino women that have been identified as having hypertension, and 3) examines the relationship between access to care and geographic availability for health care services and hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive and treated vs. untreated) and transitions in status for African American and Latino women. Of significance, assessing hypertension endpoints over time periods will allow a longitudinal assessment of the effects of SES on hypertension status. More importantly, the patterns of outcomes of the study will illuminate our understanding of the underlying factors that contribute to disparities in hypertension status for racial/ethnic women. This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine incidence and prevalence of hypertension status by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status using longitudinal data in efforts to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Past Research Program Areas:

Intersections, Identities, and Inequalities (Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, director)

This program area focuses on the development of theoretical, methodological and pedagogical approaches to the study of intersections of race, gender, class, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality. It is an interdisciplinary research program area that seeks to elaborate how dimensions of inequality intersect, creating new and distinct social formations. This includes promoting research that contextualizes the lives and experiences of individuals and groups, as well as develops applications of knowledge to human problems. This scholarship embraces a wide range of approaches that permit complex and nuanced explorations. Intersectional analysis is also an effort to move beyond binary or oppositional analyses and toward an understanding of the ways the ideological, political, and economic systems of power construct and reconstruct one another. An intersectional approach, grounded in lived experience, provides the intellectual foundation for the pursuit of social justice.

Health and Social Well Being of Low Income Women, Children, and Families (Dr. Ruth E. Zambrana, director)

This program area seeks to build a more comprehensive and ethnic-specific scientific knowledge base on the effects of the intersection of poverty, institutional barriers, and other non-medical factors that contribute to adverse health status. This approach takes into account the influence of race, gender, and ethnicity to promote responsiveness in the development of future health interventions.

Material Culture/Visual Culture (Drs. Mary Corbin Sies and Angel David Nieves, co-directors)

The Material Culture/Visual Culture (MC/VC) program area is engaged in research on African American material and visual culture, and more generally on the material and visual culture of marginalized subgroups of North America. The group seeks to publicize the value of material and visual evidence for understanding the cultures of everyday life of American subcultures and to foster an environment in which scholars from different backgrounds can explore and refine research and theories for working with material and visual culture.

Schooling, Ethnic Communities and International Perspectives. (Dr. Lory J. Dance, director).

This Research Program Area is in the early stages of development. Led by sociologist Dr. Lory J. Dance, this area focuses on the uses of qualitative methodologies in the study of education in ethnic communities in the United States and internationally. The group also houses the Qualitative Research Interest Group (QRIG; co-directed by Drs. Lory J. Dance and Annette Lareau), which sponsored a colloquium series in fall 2005 on funding qualitative research projects.

Other Activities:

Intersectional Research Database. CRGE is home to the world's first online database devoted exclusively to intersectional research. The Intersectional Research Database (IRD), which was launched in summer 2005, currently features over 100 annotations of articles and books on intersectional issues. The IRD is updated weekly and will soon include audio, visual images, video and sound.

CRGE Graduate Colloquium. CRGE holds a monthly colloquium for graduate students that focuses on various topics related to intersectionality and social justice. Graduate students from across the disciplines participate through attendance and by sharing their own work at the end of each semester. Recent colloquium topics have dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; interdisciplinary job talks; intersections and sexualities; and the commodification of Black youth, which was led by Dr. Patricia Hill Collins.

Research Interest Groups (RIGS). RIGS are smaller research groups, each sponsored by a Research Program Area. RIGS are collaborative, interdisciplinary groups that conduct intersectional research. The RIGS aim to create groups that can assist their members in preparing and submitting proposals for federal, state, and private sector research grants in CRGE Research Program Areas.


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Reports & Resources

 Click here for all publications.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

CRISP Scholars

CRGE Interdisciplinary Scholars Program (CRISP) provides scholars with an opportunity to learn firsthand the processes of research, publication, and administration through a mentoring relationship with CRGE faculty. The focus of this exceptional program is two-fold: rigorous training and dedicated mentoring. CrISP scholars are first- and second-year incoming graduate students from departments affiliated with CRGE.


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Center for the Education of Women

The University of Michigan Center for the Education of Women (CEW) advances the personal, educational, career, professional and leadership potential of women. The services, programs, applied research, and action initiatives conducted by CEW promote inclusiveness and equity within the University, across the state and throughout the nation.

Founded in 1964, the Center for the Education of Women, within the University of Michigan, was one of the nation's first comprehensive, university-based centers focused on women.  Designed to serve the needs of women students as well as women returning to school or work, CEW (then known as the Center for the Continuing Education of Women) was founded with a three part mission of service, advocacy, and research. CEW maintains that mission today, serving University students, staff and faculty, community members, women and men, facing educational, employment or other life issues.

Contact

330 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2274
Ph. (734) 764-6005
Fx. (734) 998-6203
http://www.cew.umich.edu
cew.mail@umich.edu
contactcew@umich.edu

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Principal Staff

Gloria Thomas, Executive Director
Ph. (734) 764-7640
E-mail: gthomas@umich.edu

Wanlanda Ault, Fianance Assistant

Kristina Bee, Development and Scholarship Assistant

Jacqueline Bowman, Senior Counselor and Program Specialist

Eilisha Dermont, Communications Manager
Ph. (734) 764-6277
E-mail: edermont@umich.edu

Kirsten Elling, Associate Director for Counseling, Programs and Services

Connie Hansen, Assistant to the Director
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Employment Opportunities

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RESEARCH

Center researchers are currently analyzing the results of the Faculty Work-Life Study, a joint project of the Center for the Education of Women and the UM Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. The survey of UM faculty included questions about climate, workload, sources of satisfaction and stress, and incorporate AAUDI questions for comparison to similar institutions.  This project also provides comparison to the 1998 FWLS.

Contingent Faculty in a Tenure Track World - CEW researchers held focus groups with full- and part-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty at twelve research universities across the country. In total, we conducted 24 ninety-minute focus groups with a total of 343 full- and part-time NTT faculty. A report of the project is available  and a video based on the project explores the responses of focus group members. The project was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The National Clearinghouse on Academic Worklife  (www.academicworklife.org) combines into a single website information resources and community discussions to support those who study or participate in academic work.  Up to date articles and policy examples are available on topics ranging from family-friendly benefits, tenure attainment, and faculty satisfaction to policy development, productivity, and demographics.  An email newsletter is also available free to subscribers. This clearinghouse was developed  through a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Dual Career Ladder Project, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, resulted in several publications based on the findings of our institutional survey of U.S. institutions of higher education.  highlighting the numbers, working conditions and perceived contributions of non tenure track faculty.  These are available on the CEW website.

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

CEW’s Advanced Leadership Program offers middle management University of Michigan staff, recommended by their supervisors, an eight-month skill development workshop series and accompanying change management project.  This program has been offered annually for nearly 10 years. 

 

Focus on Leadership, addresses the need for leadership development and training for staff not yet in key middle-management positions or not yet ready for the more extensive Advanced Leadership Program.  Offered to approximately 30 individuals annually, this program offers participants an introduction to leadership concepts while it assists participants in developing an identity as a potential leader.

 

Emerging Leaders Iniative  CEW is currently developing an innovative nine-month program for emerging leaders (those with less than 6 years in their career fields) over the course of two years. The program will focus on women from a specific Michigan urban region, combining those from the private and the non-profit sectors.  The program combines in-person sessions, career coaching by senior leaders, and ongoing support and learning using web 2.0 tools including social media and online learning. 

PROGRAMS

CEW offers about 50 programs each term, covering topics such as careers, career change and job searching, work-life balance, leadership development, and focused programs for graduate students and post-docs.  In addition, CEW brings special events and speakers to the campus and community. 

In addition, CEW leads three support networks for University of Michigan women: Women of Color in the Academy Project and Junior Women Faculty Network for women faculty and the Women of Color Task Force for women staff.  These networks offer support, mentoring, and learning opportunities for participants.  The Task Force delivers a campus-wide career conference annually, with about 550 participants. 

CEW provides free counseling to students, faculty and staff of the University as well as to women and men in the community.  Each year over 1,000 adults are seen by CEW’s professional counselors.


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Reports & Resources

2012
 
"Factors Contributing to Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction among Non-Tenure-Track Faculty" By Jean Waltman, Inger Bergom, Carol Hollenshead, Jeanne Miller, and Louise August. The Journal of Higher Education, May/June 2012 83:3.  
 
Success for Nontraditional Students at Elite Institution, On Campus with Women v.40, no 3. By Gloria D. Thomas and Carol Hollenshead
 
2010
 
 
2009
 
 
"Satisfaction and Discontent: Voices of Non-Tenure-Track Faculty," By Inger Bergom and Jean Waltman. In On Campus With Women, vol 37, #3, 2009.
 
2008
 
Women of Color Faculty at the University of Michigan: Recruitment, Retention, and Campus Climate. Aimee Cox, PhD, Research Investigator Center for the Education of Women, CEW Jean Campbell Research Scholar (Executive Summary)
 
 
 
Developing a Transparent Tenure Process (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
Enabling Junior Faculty Success (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
2007
 

Post-Apartheid South Africa: Creating Critically Leaderful Schools that Make a Difference, 
Juliet Perumal, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) and CEW Visting Scholar, 2007.

How American Men's Participation in Housework and Child-care Affects Wives' Careers. 
Renge Jibu, CEW Visiting Scholar

 
 
 
2006
Attrition Among Female Tenure-Track Faculty, paper presented at AIR, May 18, 2006, Louise August
 
A Commitment to Volunteerism. Louise August, Carol Hollenshead and Sally Schmall
 

The Gender Impact of the Proposed Michigan Civil Rights Initiative: Research Brief. 
Susan Kaufmann

 

It Isn't Over: The Continuing Under-Representation of Female Faculty, paper presented at AIR, 
May 18, 2006, Louise August.

 
Non Tenure Track Faculty: The Landscape at U.S. Institutions of Higher Education: Full Report. Includes the Executive Summary as well as tables and charts reporting analyses of the survey data.
 
 
 
 
 
 
2005
 
 
 
 

Tenure Clock, Modified Duties, and Sick Leave Policies: Creating 'A Network of Support and Understanding' for University of Michigan Faculty Women During Pregnancy and Childbirth, 
Jean Waltman and Louise August

"Gender, Family, and Flexibility in Academia" Jeanne E. Miller and Carol Hollenshead in ChangeNovember/December 2005, pp.58-62
 
2004
 
"Developing and Implementing Work – Family Policies for Faculty," Beth Sullivan, Carol Hollenshead and Gilia Smith in Academe: Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors. November-December 2004.
 
2003
 
The 2003 Michigan Women's Leadership Index: Executive Summary, produced jointly by CEW and the Detroit Women's Economic Club.
 
Women at the University of Michigan: A Statistical Report on the Status of Women Students, Staff and Faculty on the Ann Arbor Campus, compiled by staff from CEW, Human Resource Records and Information Services, and the Office of Budget and Planning. (Replaced by 2010 Report)
 
2002
 
 
Sexing the Single Girl. Deborah Siegel, CEW Visiting Scholar
 
“Work/family policies in higher education: Survey data and case studies of policy implementation" by Carol S. Hollenshead, Beth Sullivan, Gilia C. Smith, Louise August, and Susan Hamilton is a chapter of The Challenge of Balancing Faculty Careers and Family Work, New Directions in Higher Education no. 130, 2005, 41-65.
 
2001
 
 
2000
 
 
Women and Higher Education 2000: Michigan: a "Smart State" for Women? Susan Kaufmann, Sally Sharp, Jeanne E. Miller, and Jean Waltman

Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity­ (Findings) A joint report from CEW, Catalyst, and the University of Michigan Business School 
Women and the MBA. The full report is available through Catalyst.

Before 2000
 
Former Women Faculty: Reasons for Leaving One Research University. Stacy A. Wenzel and Carol Hollenshead 1998

The Michigan Faculty Work-Life Study 1999. Executive SummaryComplete Report
.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholar Program

The Visiting Scholar Program is an opportunity for scholars to pursue research projects relevant to women using the vast resources available through the Center for the Education of Women (CEW) and the University of Michigan. Scholars must hold a Ph.D. or equivalent degree. A scholar's stay at the Center can range from one to twelve months, as appropriate to the scholar's research needs. Visiting Scholars prepare a working paper based upon their research, which is published as part of the Center's series of occasional papers.

Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship

The Center for the Education of Women announces the Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship with a grant of up to $3,200. The fund will support research by a graduate student from the Islamic World or Africa matriculating in the Rackham Graduate School.


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Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Founded in 1974, the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University creates knowledge and seeks to implement change to promote gender equality. Our current focus is Moving Beyond the Stalled Gender Revolution. We are bringing together an intellectually diverse group of scholars to provide new insights into the barriers to women's advancement and to propose novel and workable solutions to advancing gender equality.

Contact

589 Capistrano Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8640
Ph. (650) 723-1994
Fx. (650) 725-0374
http://gender.stanford.edu/
gender-email@stanford.edu


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Principal Staff

Lori Nishiura Mackenzie, Executive Director
PH. (650) 723-1994
Email: lorim@stanford.edu

Shelley J. Correll, Director, Clayman Institute
Ph. (650) 723-1994
E-mail: scorrell@stanford.edu

Ann Enthoven, Program Manager
E-mail: ann.enthoven@stanford.edu

Andrea Rees Davies, Director of Programs and Research
E-mail: ardavies@stanford.edu

Wendy Skidmore, Program Associate

Marion Groh Marquardt, Web Specialist
Email: marionm@stanford.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Ms. at 40 and the Future of Feminism

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Ms. magazine in January 2012 at Stanford University. A keynote speech by Ms. founding editor, Gloria Steinem, will be the centerpiece of a Winter Quarter series of events that looks back on what Ms. has meant to its readers over the last 40 years and that looks ahead to what feminism may mean for the next generation.  
 
 
According to national studies, women hold more than half of all professional occupations in the U.S. but fewer than 24 percent of all computing-related occupations, representing a huge pool of untapped talent. The numbers are not moving in favor of increasing women's participation in technology; in 2008 women earned only 18 percent of all computer science degrees. Back in 1985, women earned 37 percent of CS degrees, nearly double today's share.

The Clayman Institute for Gender Research conducted two studies looking at the participation of women in technology and offering new ideas and solutions for increasing the role women play in the development and use of technology.
 
 
The lectures will take place in Winter Quarter at Stanford University. Lecturers will be selected competitively. Nominations by must include a description of the contribution of the nominee to advancing gender equality. Special emphasis will be placed on inviting women of color, women who reach across traditional disciplinary boundaries, and women who play a public role in advancing gender equality. Nominations are accepted on a rolling basis as lecture slots are still available. Nominators are encouraged to contact the Clayman Institute [email] to discuss potential nominees and nomination requirements prior to submitting a nomination.
 
The Clayman Institute will provide publicity and will cover the costs of travel, a small honorarium, and networking events and meals.
 
 
"Art at the Institute" exhibits artists, female and male, whose work critically engages with contemporary discourses around gender. Work seen at Serra House ranges from paintings to photography, computer manipulated images, weaving, prints, and mixed media, and illustrates artists' rich use of imagery, form, political perspectives, and grrrl attitude. The program will highlight the ways contemporary art takes part in the ongoing dialogues surrounding gender. 
 
 
The Clayman Institute supports efforts that translate our research and programs into actions for change. We have posted videos, discussion guides, and other ways to keep the conversation going. Sometimes, research is the first stop on the way to change.

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Reports & Resources

 
Meeting the needs and expectations of dual-career academic couples - while still ensuring the high quality of university faculty - is one of the great challenges facing universities. Academic couples (those with both partners working in an academic environment) represent a deep pool of talent. Yet, dual-career academic hiring often remains difficult and controversial. The Clayman Institute's 2008 study, Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need to Know, surveyed 30,000 faculty at 13 of the nation's leading public and private research universities. The report reviews practices, policies and programs for administrators to successfully work with the hiring and retaining of dual-career academic couples. Our pages contain resources for academic institutions and dual-career couples alike.

Aging

Yalom, Marilyn & Carstensen, Laura (eds). Inside the American Couple. ( Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002>

Difficult Dialogues Program - Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Aging in the 21st Century consensus report. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University, 2002)

Economic and social status of women

Clayman Institute. 2008. Climbing The Tech Ladder; Obstacles and Solutions for Mid-Level Women in Information Technology. Written by A. Henderson, C. Simard, S. Gilmartin, L. Schiebinger, and T. Whitney.

Strober, Myra and Agnes Miling Keneko Chan. The Road Winds Uphill All the Way: Gender, Work, and Family in the United States and Japan. (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1999)

Family

Clayman Institute. 2008. Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need To Know. Written by L. Schiebinger, A. Henderson, and S. Gilmartin.

Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Wife. ( New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers Inc., 2001)

Yalom, Marilyn and Thorne, Barrie (eds). Rethinking the Family. (Albany, NY: State University New York Press, 1990)

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Rhode, Deborah L. Speaking of Sex: The Denial of Gender Inequality. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997)

Rhode, Deborah L. Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Difference. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990)

Boxer, Marilyn Jacoby. When Women Ask the Questions: Creating Women's Studies in America. (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998)

Freedman, Estelle. No Turning Back. ( Westminster, MD: Ballantine Books, 2002)

Global Issues

Walker-Moffat, Wendy. The Other Side of the Asian American Success Story. (San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995)

Mahadevi Varma. Translated by Neera Kuckerja Sohoni. Sketches from My Past: Encounters with India's Oppressed. (Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 1997)

Mankekar, Purnima. Screening Culture, Viewing Politics: Television, Womanhood and Nation in Modern India. ( Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000)

Zheng, Wang. Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories. (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, Berkeley, 1999)

Health and Health Care

Litt, Iris. Taking Our Pulse: The Health of America's Women. (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1997)

History

Freedman, Estelle. Maternal Justice: Miriam Van Waters and the Female Reform Tradition. (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1996)

Gelles, Edith. First Thoughts: Life and Letters of Abigail Adams. (New York, NY: Twayne Publishers, 1998)

Gelles, Edith. Portia: The World of Abigail Adams. (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1992)

McCurry, Stephanie. Masters of Small Worlds: Yeoman Households, Gender Relations and the Political Culture of Antebellum South Carolina Low Country. (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1995)

Offen, Karen. European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000)

Schiebinger, Londa. Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World ( Harvard University Press, 2004)
Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Breast. (New York, NY: Knopf, 1997)

Science

Schiebinger, L., (ed.). 2008. Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering. Stanford University Press, 2008 was published on March 12, 2008.  

Schiebinger, Londa. Nature's Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science (Beacon Press, 1993; Rutgers University Press, 2004)

Schiebinger, Londa. Has Feminism Changed Science? (Harvard University Press, 1999)

Schiebinger, Londa. The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Harvard University Press, 1989)

Sexuality

Lewin, Ellen. Inventing Lesbian Cultures in America. (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1996)

Mintz, Beth & Rothblum, Esther (eds). Lesbians in Academia: Degrees of Freedom. (New York, NY: Routledge, 1997)


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

The Clayman Institute offers a two-year postdoctoral fellowship that focus on the Institute's theme, "Beyond the Stalled Revolution: Reinvigorating Gender Equality in the Twenty-first Century." Recent Ph.D.'s in all disciplines of the humanities and social sciences whose research focuses on gender are eligible. We encourage scholars with a strong interest in interdisciplinary methods to apply. While in residence at the Institute, Postdoctoral Scholars are expected to participate in Clayman Institute activities throughout the academic year in addition to pursuing their own research.

Graduate Dissertation Fellowships

The Clayman Institute’s Graduate Dissertation Fellowships (GDF) are awarded to outstanding Stanford doctoral students who are engaged in research on women and/or gender. The fellowships will provide financial support for top gender scholars as they complete their dissertations, while encouraging interdisciplinary connections for their research. Clayman GDFs will have offices at the Clayman Institute, where they will participate in the intellectual life of the Clayman Institute as well as take part in professional development workshops during the academic year.  GDFs will be contributing to the writing and research efforts of the Clayman Institute. Fellowship funding is for three quarters: two quarters of research assistantship and one quarter teaching assistantship. In addition to the stipend, GDFs will receive $1,000 in research funding.

Marilyn Yalom Research Fund

The Marilyn Yalom Research Fund supports currently enrolled Stanford Ph.D. candidates working in the humanities on issues concerning women and gender in the humanities.  The research funds support original research or conference costs. Dr. Yalom has been part of the Clayman Institute since 1978, having served as both Associate Director and Acting Director. She is currently a Senior Scholar, and is well known as an internationally acclaimed historian of women's and gender issues.

Majorie Lozoff Graduate Prize

The Marjorie Lozoff Prize is awarded annually by the Marjorie Lozoff Fund for Research on Women and Gender to promote scholarship in areas that further women's development. All currently registered Stanford University graduate students, in any academic or professional discipline, are eligible. The range of research topics include, but are not limited to: men and women's role within the family; the role of women and gender in science, medicine, and engineering; women's participation in the professions and other areas of work; women as entrepreneurs; women and gender in developing societies; women and gender cross-culturally. Preference will be given to original research on current social issues.

Myra Strober Prize

The Myra Strober Prize honors the best Gender News article written by a Stanford graduate or undergraduate student.  The $1,500 annual prize highlights news articles about women’s education, work, family, or the nexus of work and family.


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Women's Research & Resource Center

The Spelman College Women’s Research & Resource Center embraces our unique identity and claims our pioneering role among historically Black and women’s colleges firmly rooted in the liberal arts tradition. We are committed to creating a global community of progressive women and men who envision a world free from injustice, exploitation, violence, poverty, waste, greed, illness, and misogyny. We are especially opposed to practices and images that debase African American and other women of color. 

Through curricular innovation, scholarship, activism and collaborations, the Women’s Center is educating future generation of free-thinking, unapologetic Black women who will document our stories, advocate for our rights, and join with others in the ongoing struggle to transform our communities and rescue the planet!

Principal Staff

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: bsheftal@spelman.edu

M. Bahati Kuumba, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: kuumba@spelman.edu

Ayoka Chenzira, Director of Digital Moving Salon
E-mail: chenzira@spelman.edu

Lillie Picard, Administrative Assistant
Ph. (404) 270-5625
E-mail: lpicard@spelman.edu

Dana Pride Jones, Program Coordinator
Ph. (404) 270-5627
E-mail: dpjones@spelman.edu
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Projects & Campaigns

 
Another premier component of the program is the Digital Moving Image Salon, which teaches students how to make films. Launched in 2004 by Dr. Ayoka Chenzira, an award-winning, internationally acclaimed film and video digital media artist, and the College’s first Cosby Chair, DMIS serves as a learning space, training ground, and production studio for students interested in documentary film making and digital media productions.
 
Juliana Montgomery graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in film studies from Spelman in 2006. She has the distinction of being Spelman's first graduate in the independent major she created, and was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Among the works that she associate produced was the 2009 Emmy Award-winning Coca-Cola advertisement, “Heist.”
“Spelman’s comparative women’s studies department not only supported my independent major and course of study, it made possible an environment through which my understanding of images of women – especially of women of color – within the visual media, could be realized,” said Montgomery.

Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference

Named for feminist author, scholar, activist and filmmaker Toni Cade Bambara, the conference acknowledges her legacy of scholarship and social activism.

“Year after year we’ve been able to motivate students to engage in creative ways to celebrate the life and legacy of one of our most important sheroes,” said Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D., founding director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center. “No one else remembers Toni Cade Bambara annually in the ways we do, and for that, I am sure the people she impacted for so many years, including me, are very grateful.”
 
The two-day conference is developed and facilitated by Spelman students who are led by Bahati Kuumba, Ph.D., associate professor of women's studies, and associate director of the Women's Research and Resource Center. It features paper presentations, workshops and performance pieces that delve into dimensions of Black/African women’s lives, scholarship and social change activism.

"The conference brings awareness to issues related to women of African descent and women of color who have been actively engaged in using their knowledge and organizational skills to forward social justice," said Kuumba.

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Center News

Center for Gender in Organizations

The work of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO), an academic research institute, serves as a fundamental call to action. Our research and experience repeatedly demonstrate that gender equity and diversity greatly improve work practice and overall organizational effectiveness.
 
Gender is an organizational issue. Our research emphatically shows that businesses benefit when they view gender equity as a strategic imperative and a source of competitive advantage.

Contact

300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
Ph. 617-521-3824
Fx. 617-521-3878
http://www.simmons.edu/som/centers/cgo/index.php
cgo@simmons.edu


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Principal Staff

Patricia Deyton, Director
Specialization: Nonprofit and general management, gender and diversity
E-mail: patricia.deyton@simmons.edu

Stacy Blake-Beard, Senior Faculty Affiliate
Specialization: Organization behavior, mentoring, diversity
E-mail: stacy.blakebeard@simmons.edu
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Gender, Equity, and Change

The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) takes a unique approach to addressing gender and diversity issues in the workplace. Rather than seeing gender as a problem that individual women and men confront at work, we believe gender is deeply embedded in an organization's culture and practices. It is at this level of analysis that the most significant research is undertaken and from which real change emerges.

Leadership

Understanding leadership similarities and differences of women and men as well as their resulting impact on organizations is a linchpin of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) research. In addition to studying leadership issues, we also regularly examine the progress women have made in achieving leadership positions in varied organizations to understand the lessons learned and consider, as well, the contributions made by role models and mentors.

Diversity

CGO uses a "complexity lens" to understand gender and diversity. Through this lens, differences are seen as a simultaneous process of identity and institutional practices. The new insight gained through the use of this lens has led CGO to the development of a theory of simultaneity to strengthen diversity efforts. Simply stated, the theory works with the reality that all people have multiple identities, all of which are present "at the table" in any interaction and any of which may be more or less salient in any particular situation.

Globalization

Globalization research focuses on the growing interconnectedness of workforces, stemming from trends such as outsourcing, immigration and technological change. The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) seeks to understand the impact of multiple cultures and identities on work practices and global workforce productivity and to help ensure that traditional white, North American standards are not automatically applied to the rest of the world.

Entrepreneurship


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Reports & Resources

CGO Commentaries

CGO Commentaries are articles adapted from talks or papers delivered by our faculty affiliates and other distinguished scholars and practitioners. They highlight current and emerging topics in gender equity, diversity and organizational studies.

CGO Insights Briefing Notes

CGO Insights is a series of short briefing notes on topics promoting organizational effectiveness through improved gender equity and diversity. These are written for practitioners and scholars alike.

CGO Working Papers

CGO Working Papers disseminate trends and new developments in research, theory, and practice related to gender equity, diversity and organizational effectiveness.

Books

CGO faculty and affiliates have authored and edited more than a dozen books. CGO faculty affiliates have authored and edited many books.


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Center News

Institute for Research on Women

At the forefront of feminist research for over thirty years, the Institute for Research on Women (IRW) advances cutting-edge, interdisciplinary scholarship on gender, sexuality and women. Part of the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the IRW was founded in 1977 by faculty and administrators seeking to expand feminist scholarship and activism beyond the university’s fledgling Women’s Studies program. Today, the IRW supports a broad range of programming designed to stimulate research on gender, sexuality and women within and across the disciplines, throughout and beyond Rutgers. Promoting faculty and student connections and building intellectual community are also central to the IRW’s mission.

Contact

160 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8555
Ph. (732) 932-9072
Fx. (732) 932-0861
http://irw.rutgers.edu/
irw@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel, Ph.D., Director

Sarah Tobias, Ph.D., Associate Director
E-mail: stobias@rci.rutgers.edu

Marlene Importico, Program Coordinator
E-mail: importic@rci.rutgers.edu

Yomaira Figueroa, IRW Learning Community Coordinator
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The IRW fosters feminist research at Rutgers through creative programming tied to an annual theme. The weekly Faculty/Graduate Seminar brings together faculty and advanced graduate students from a broad range of disciplines and from all three Rutgers campuses. Participants present works-in-progress, addressing the IRW’s annual theme from a range of disciplinary and methodological perspectives. The Distinguished Lecture Series presents innovative research by prominent feminist scholars and activists from Rutgers and other universities, exploring the annual theme in depth. The Undergraduate Learning Community extends the strengths of the IRW’s programs and research community to advanced undergraduate students who attend the IRW’s lecture series, develop research projects related to the annual theme, and work with IRW seminar fellows as mentors. Recent annual themes have included The Culture of Rights/The Rights of Culture (2008-9), Gendered Agency (2009-10) and The Art & Science of Happiness (2010-11).
 
In addition to its thematic programming, the IRW regularly organizes a one-to-three day Spring Colloquium addressing emergent debates in feminist activism and scholarship. Previous topics include the intersections of labor, class and sexuality; immigrant women’s collective organizing and the tensions between gender and disability studies.
 
Other regular programs include a workshop on Negotiating Basics for Women Entering the Academic Job Market, featuring women faculty of different ranks from the sciences, social sciences and humanities, and a Graduate Student Forum on Feminist Scholarship, enabling graduate students to share and receive feedback on their research.

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Reports & Resources

Books

Gender and Culture at the Limits of Rights, edited by Dorothy L. Hodgson (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), explores the concept of "women's rights as human rights” and the way in which a rights-based analysis can promote or limit the attainment of gender justice. Most of the essays in the volume were originally presented as part of the 2008-9 IRW seminar and its accompanying spring colloquium.

No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminism, edited by Nancy Hewitt (Rutgers University Press, 2010) showcases a group of papers that were first presented at an IRW colloquium. The contributors "address issues of race, class and sexuality within histories of women's rights and feminism as well as the cultural and intellectual currents and social and political priorities that marked movements for women's advancement and liberation. The concept of waves surging and receding cannot fully capture these multiple and overlapping movements, chronologies, issues, and sites."

The papers collected in The Sex of Class: Women Transforming American Labor, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble (Cornell University Press, 2007), examines the role sex plays in the workforce, as well as contemporary and historical domestic and global labor movements. 

The Journal of International Labor and Working-Class History issued a special edition on “Working-Class Subjectivities and Sexualities” in Spring 2006. Edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble and Victoria Hattam, several of the articles in this volume were first presented as papers at spring colloquium organized by the IRW and ILWCH in 2004. 

Gendering Disability, edited by Bonnie G. Smith and Beth Hutchison (Rutgers University Press, 2004), collects work presented at a three-day IRW conference that brought together gender studies and disabilities studies scholars.

Feminist Locations: Local and Global, Theory and Practice edited by Marianne DeKoven (Rutgers University Press, 2001), is based on scholarship presented at the IRW from 1995 to 1998.

Transitions, Environments, Translations: Feminisms in International Politics edited by Joan W. Scott, Cora Kaplan, and Debra Keates (Routledge, 1997), from work presented at a conference jointly presented by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton and the IRW.

With the Women's Rights Litigation Clinic at Rutgers Law School-Newark, the IRW co-sponsored The Project on Reproductive Rights Laws for the 1990s which culminated in the 1989 Rutgers University Press volume Reproductive Laws for the 1990s, co-edited by Sherrill Cohen and Nadine Taub.

Describing the impetus for Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory and Writing By Black Women (Rugters University Press, 1989), Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English Cheryl Wall writes, “I took the idea for a one-day conference to then-IRW director Carol Smith, who embraced it enthusiastically. The conference on October 22-23, 1987, was one of the most gratifying experiences of my career. The room for the symposium was filled with many of the most brilliant scholars and writers of my generation. The book became one of the foundational texts in black feminist criticism. I will forever be grateful for the support of the IRW.”

Women, Households, and the Economy, edited by Lourdes Beneria and Catharine R. Stimpson (Rutgers University Press, 1987), collects papers presented at a two-day conference stemming from a grant from the Russell Sage Foundation “to bring together a group of scholars on the cutting edge of the thinking about women and the economy.”

Working Papers

Revised and condensed versions of work presented at our weekly seminar have been published in four volumes. Copies are available on request from the IRW. 
 
Femininities, Masculinities, and The Politics of Sexual Difference(s): Working Papers from the 2003-2004 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Beth Hutchison and Amanda B. Chaloupka
 
Reconfiguring Class and Gender: Working Papers from the 2002-2003 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Amanda B. Chaloupka, and Beth Hutchison
 
Modes of Knowledge and Action: Working Papers from the Women in the Public Sphere Seminar 1998-1999, edited by Beth Hutchison
 

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 Visiting Global Scholars

As part of its commitment to foster feminist research at Rutgers and beyond, the IRW hosts feminist researchers from around the world as visiting global scholars. Visiting global scholars are able to pursue their own research and writing in a supportive environment and access Rutgers’ unique feminist resources. They also participate in the IRW seminar, present public lectures to the university community and speak in classes and community forums.


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National Women's Law Center

The National Women's Law Center was founded in 1972 as a non-profit advocacy organization working to advance the progress of women, girls, and families with emphasis on employment, education, reproductive rights and health, and family issues. The Center has been at the forefront of the major legal and public policy initiatives in this country to improve the lives of women: educating state, local, and federal policy-makers as well as members of the public about critical women's issues; building and leading coalitions; litigating ground-breaking cases and informing landmark Supreme Court decisions. The Center is a sponsor of human rights, helping to resonate women's voices through the minds of public policy-makers, advocates, and the public alike.

Contact

11 Dupont Circle, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Ph. (202) 588-5180
Fx. (202) 588-5185
http://www.nwlc.org/
info@nwlc.org


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Principal Staff

Nancy Duff Campbell, Co-President
E-mail: campbell@nwlc.org

Marcia Greenberger, Co-President
E-mail: mgreenberger@nwlc.org

Joan Entmacher, Vice President for Family Economic Security

Fatima Goss Graves, Vice President for Education and Employment

Niesa Brateman Halpern, Vice President of Administration and Finance

Emily Martin, Vice President and General Counsel

Karen Schneider, Vice President for Communications

Judy Waxman, Vice President for Health and Reproductive Rights
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The child care needs of American families have increased sharply as women with children enter the paid workforce in growing numbers and as recognition grows about the importance of high-quality early learning experiences to help children get a strong start. We're working to create and strengthen policies to improve the quality, affordability, and accessibility of child care and early education.

 
Women and girls have come a long way since the enactment of Title IX – the federal civil rights law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. Still, far too many students are denied equal educational opportunities, particularly low-income and minority students. We're working to eliminate and prevent barriers, including discrimination, to students' success in school.
 
 
Women still face discrimination in the workplace, and they still earn, on average, only 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. We're working to achieve equality in the workplace, including equal pay, the elimination of harassment and other forms of sex discrimination, and the removal of barriers to nontraditional careers for women.

 
Women's health is endangered by limited access to health care, and reproductive rights are under concerted attack. We're working to protect reproductive rights, guarantee health care for women and families, and promote policies to advance and protect women's health.

 
When federal judges are not committed to enforcing basic rights critical to women, hard-won legal rights are drastically eroded. We're working to promote a fair and independent judiciary and supporting nominees who have demonstrated a commitment to equal opportunity for women and families.
 
 
Women are at greater risk of poverty than men at all stages of their lives because of ongoing employment discrimination and greater responsibilities for unpaid caregiving. We're working to strengthen income and work support programs to increase economic security for women and their families.
 
 
Women’s lower lifetime earnings and longer lifespan put them at far greater risk of poverty as they age than men. We’re working to increase women’s retirement security by strengthening Social Security and supporting pension and savings protections.

 
While the wealthiest Americans have benefited for years from tax cuts and tax loopholes, investments vital to women and their families have been shortchanged. We're working for a fair and progressive tax system that raises the revenue needed to meet our shared priorities and expand opportunity for all.


In the past half century, a commitment to principles of nondiscrimination and equality has transformed the lives of women and their families and the nation as a whole. But much remains to be done to ensure that the promise of equal opportunity is fulfilled in women's lives. We're working to realize a broad vision for progress for women and their families.

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Reports & Resources

For all publications, click here.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Public Policy Fellowship

The fellow will work on a variety of issues, which may include: tax and budget policy, child care, income support, retirement security, education reform, equal education and employment opportunity, barriers for low-wage workers, and education

Employment Fellow

The fellow will focus on promoting opportunities for women and girls in school and at work. The issues may include improving graduation rates for girls, with a particular focus on low income girls, girls of color, and teen parents; addressing gender-based harassment and bullying; increasing gender equity in athletics, removing barriers for women in nontraditional education and job training; advocating for workplace fairness and equal pay. Responsibilities may include researching and analyzing policy and legal issues and drafting a variety of materials, such as memos, fact sheets, reports, comments on regulations, legal briefs.

Health Policy Fellow

As part of the Center’s work on women and health reform, the Health Fellow will work on a range of issues related to women’s access to health care, with particular emphasis on access to comprehensive and affordable health coverage for low-income women. Responsibilities will include gathering, analyzing and synthesizing research and data from a variety of sources; analyzing policy proposals; drafting reports and other written materials, and working with national and state-based coalitions on legislative and regulatory matters.


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