Equality, Diversity & Inclusion

Re:Gender’s work on behalf of women and girls is based on the principle that equality must take into account diversity and inclusion to bring about a society that is more just for all. Diversity includes, but is not limited to, gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, social class, sexual orientation, age, ability and political perspective. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information. For a review of Regender's Diversity & Inclusion Program click here

Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights

See: Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights

FromInstitute for Research on Women at Rutgers University

Author: Dorothy L. Hodgson

Date Published: May 17, 2011

 

An interdisciplinary collection, Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights examines the potential and limitations of the "women's rights as human rights" framework as a strategy for seeking gender justice. Drawing on detailed case studies from the United States, Africa, Latin America, Asia, and elsewhere, contributors to the volume explore the specific social histories, political struggles, cultural assumptions, and gender ideologies that have produced certain rights or reframed long-standing debates in the language of rights.

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An interdisciplinary collection, Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights examines the potential and limitations of the "women's rights as human rights" framework as a strategy for seeking gender justice. Drawing on detailed case studies from the United States, Africa, Latin America, Asia, and elsewhere, contributors to the volume explore the specific social histories, political struggles, cultural assumptions, and gender ideologies that have produced certain rights or reframed long-standing debates in the language of rights. 

Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights

An interdisciplinary collection, Gender and Culture at the Limit of Rights examines the potential and limitations of the "women's rights as human rights" framework as a strategy for seeking gender justice. Drawing on detailed case studies from the United States, Africa, Latin America, Asia, and elsewhere, contributors to the volume explore the specific social histories, political struggles, cultural assumptions, and gender ideologies that have produced certain rights or reframed long-standing debates in the language of rights.

URL: 
http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/14860.html

Why Negotiation is Only Part of the Solution

Did you know that women are more likely to face negative social consequences for negotiating?  This seems to go against the pervasive notion that women effectively negotiating for high salaries will be a magic bullet for closing the wage gap.  According to Hannah Riley Bowles, Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and Linda Babcock, Carnegie Mellon University, in their article How Can Women Escape the Compensation Negotiation Dilemma? Relational Accounts Are One Answer, “…women entering compensation negotiations face a dilemma: They have to weigh the benefits of negotiating against the social consequences of having negotiated.”


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Going beyond Women’s Ambition: Diversifying Corporate Leadership from All Angles

*By Áine Duggan*

In his recent  LinkedIn post, PricewaterhouseCooper’s (PwC) Bob Moritz, Chairman and Senior Partner, shares steps CEOs can take to tackle the challenge of diversifying corporate leadership and closing the gap.  Bob, one of our 2013 “Making a Difference for Women” Award recipients, highlights accountability, inclusivity, and awareness, all of which seem to be common sense. However, it is in implementation of these principles, or lack thereof, where some companies miss the mark and PwC leads.  Bob acknowledges that the solution goes beyond women’s ambition, requiring work by institutions and individuals, BOTH men and women.  We all need to work together, not just to discuss what needs to be done, but to take action.


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No Reward, Therefore Not Worth the Risk: Why LGBTQ in the Military Are Still Not Coming Out

 Prior to the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) in 2011, an estimated 48,500 lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals were serving on active duty or in the ready reserve in the US military, and an additional 22,000 were in the standby and retired reserve forces, accounting for approximately 2.2 percent of military personnel.   But have these numbers changed since the repeal?  A Military Times poll found that just one of the soldiers surveyed had come out to his unit since the repeal of the policy.


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Retirement Security: Older Women Remain at Risk

GAO-12-825T, Jul 25, 2012

 

What GAO Found

Over the last decade, working women’s access to and participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans have improved relative to men. In fact, from 1998 to 2009, women surpassed men in their likelihood of working for an employer that offered a pension plan—largely because the proportion of men covered by a plan declined. Furthermore, as employers have continued to terminate their defined benefit plans and switch to defined contribution plans, the proportion of women who worked for employers that offered a defined contribution plan increased. Women’s higher rates of pension coverage may be due to the fact that they are more likely to work in the public and nonprofit sectors and industries that offer coverage, such as health and education.

URL: 
http://gao.gov/products/GAO-12-825T
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