Globalization, Human Rights & Security

Women make up a majority of the world’s poor; more than half of immigrants, refugees and casualties of armed conflicts; and they are often the first to feel the brunt of economic, political, environmental and humanitarian crises. At the same time, women are essential partners for promoting conflict resolution, reducing extremism and promoting post-conflict reconstruction and sustainable development. However, governments and international organizations often overlook the significant contributions and vital perspectives of women and girls, thereby undermining effective security policies and peace-building initiatives. Human rights advocates and security experts are calling for more efforts to invest in women, implement gender-sensitive laws and policies and ensure that women are included at decision-making tables. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

The Global Gender Gap Report, 2008

Through the Global Gender Gap Reports for the past three years, the World Economic Forum has been providing a framework for quantifying the magnitute of gender-based disparities, tracking their progress over time and designing effective measures reducing them. In addition, in 2008, the Global Gender Parity Group and Regional Gender Parity Groups were launched in Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

URL: 
http://www.weforum.org/pdf/gendergap/report2008.pdf

Reaching Common Grounds: Culture, Gender and Human Rights, Equality and Empowering Women

This chapter outlines the United Nations’ work toward promoting gender equality, including the Beijing Platform for Action. The report also describes the obstacles women still face today, with an emphasis on cultural impediments. A list of recommendations for future action coincides with a list of lessons learned.
 

URL: 
http://www.unfpa.org/swp/2008/en/03_promoting_gender_equality.html

Innovative Approach to Promoting Women’s Economic Empowerment

The publication focuses on three core dimensions of women’s economic empowerment, namely: economic opportunity; legal status; and voice, inclusion and participation in economic decision-making.
 

URL: 
http://www.undp.org/women/publications.shtml

Helen Suzman: Fighter for Human Rights

Date/Time: 
02/09/2010 - 03/25/2010

A photographic exhibit:

 
Helen Suzman was a member of the South African Parliament for 36 years, from 1953-1989. She was the sole opposition voice condemning apartheid during the 13-year period (1961-1974) when she was the governing body's only member of the Progressive Party. The exhibition explores nearly four decades of Suzman's life and vision through photographs, personal letters quotations from speeches and news articles.

Gender Equality as Smart Economics: A World Bank Group Gender Action Plan, Fiscal Years 2007-2010

This Action Plan seeks to advance women’s economic empowerment in the World Bank Group’s client countries in order to promote shared growth and accelerate the implementation of Millennium Development Goal 3 (MDG3- promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment). The Plan would commit the World Bank to intensify and scale up gender mainstreaming in the economic sectors over four years, in partnership with client countries, donors, and other development agencies. The Bank group and its partners would increase resources devoted to gender issues in operations and technical assistance, in Results-Based Initiatives (RBIs), and in policy-relevant research and statistics. An assessment at the end of the four-year period would determine whether to extend the Action Plan’s timeframe.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTGENDER/Resources/GAPNov2.pdf

Passport to Equality

The Passport to Equality is a document that presents, explains, and reproduces the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in the form of a personal passport.
 

URL: 
http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0014/001475/147507e.pdf

Women, War, Peace: The Independent Experts’ Assessment on the Impact of Armed Conflict on Women and Women’s Role in Peace-Building (Progress of the World’s Women 2002, Vol. 1)

Historically, the world has been silent about the situation of women in war, almost as silent as the women who remain on the sidelines during war or who are excluded from peace negotiations. In addition, women often lack the confidence and the knowledge needed to participate in peace building and reconstruction. 

But change is possible. "Women, War and Peace" provides examples of women in embattled regions who have been able to overcome the odds and contribute to the safety and well-being of their communities. Personal stories are shared of women involved in peace efforts.
 

URL: 
http://www.unifem.org/materials/item_detail.php?ProductID=17

Clinton Speaks on Women and Girls at Afghan Conference/Remarks at the International Conference on Afghanistan

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, good afternoon, everyone. I think we have just wrapped up a very productive conference and we have seen the results of cooperation in the international community on a number of very important issues. I want to thank Prime Minister Brown and Foreign Secretary Miliband, the Government of Afghanistan, and the United Nations for bringing us all together and sponsoring this important meeting.
 

 

And I think that what we have seen is a global challenge that is being met with a global response. I especially thank the countries that have committed additional troops, leading with our host country, the United Kingdom, but including Italy, Germany, Romania. We also are grateful to all those who made their contributions known today. There are other countries such as Russia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, who are providing air space rights and other transit assistance.
 

 

Shroud of Silence

This award-winning short documentary chronicles the everyday struggle that was like for Afghan women and girls under the Taliban regime's brutal system of gender apartheid from 1994 to 2002.

Narrated by Carrie Fisher
Produced and Directed by Lorraine Sheinberg

Video URL: 
Untitled
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