Health, Reproductive Rights & Sexuality

Full equality for women and girls can be attained only when they have the information and services they need to lead healthy lives and make informed and independent decisions about their health, reproductive health and sexuality. Health for women depends on many factors, including access to safe water and nutritious food; affordable care and insurance; disease prevention and access to comprehensive reproductive and maternal health services; and awareness and support for women with HIV/AIDS and other diseases and disabilities. Health is not limited to physical well-being but extends to sexuality, mental health and body image as well. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

ReSearch: Our Bodies, Our Health

It’s been 40 years since the appearance of the pathbreaking book, Our Bodies, Ourselves. Here at the WSRC we are fortunate that one of our Scholars, Paula Doress-Worters, a founding member of the Our Bodies, Ourselves collective, can share its history so we can see how far we’ve come. And even though much has been accomplished - women are no longer excluded from medical studies; women are half the students in medical schools; and much more - research needs to continue to uncover the next layer of issues. For example, we have to understand why women are more likely than men to leave the world of academic medicine (see the article by WSRC Senior Research Scientist Linda Pololi). We have to understand how women’s access to medical care changes when governments change (see the article by WSRC Scholar Ogderel Dashzeveg).

URL: 
http://www.brandeis.edu/wsrc/research/docs/spring2012.pdf
Member Organization: 

The Economic Security and Well-being Index for Women in New York City™

New York City is home to more than four million women and girls representing a wide range of racial and ethnic backgrounds, citizenship statuses, educational attainment levels, and occupations. Of those, close to one in four are economically vulnerable, meaning they are likely to live in poverty, have lower earnings and suffer longer spells of unemployment than other women in the City. 

Teaser: 

The Economic Security and Well-being Index for Women in New York City™ provides an in-depth analysis of the economic security, health and safety, and well-being of women in the 59 community districts. It analyzes issues that shape the lives of women and girls, including poverty, income and employment; violence and safety; and education and health.

Economic Security and Well-Being Index for Women in New York City

New York City is home to more than four million women and girls representing a wide range of racial and ethnic backgrounds, citizenship statuses, educational attainment levels, and occupations. Of those, close to one in four are economically vulnerable, meaning they are likely to live in poverty, have lower earnings and suffer longer spells of unemployment than other women in the City. 

URL: 
http://www.nywf.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/New-York-Womens-Foundation-Report.pdf
Member Organization: 

Intended and Unintended Births in the United States: 1982–2010

Report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Objectives—This report shows trends since 1982 in whether a woman wanted to get pregnant just before the pregnancy occurred. This is the most direct measure available of the extent to which women are able (or unable) to choose to have the number of births they want, when they want them. In this report, this is called the ‘‘standard measure of unintended pregnancy.’’

Methods—The data used in this report are primarily from the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. The 2006–2010 NSFG included in-person interviews with 12,279 women aged 15–44. Some data in the trend analyses are taken from NSFG surveys conducted in
1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002.

URL: 
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr055.pdf

2012 Mid-Year Legislative Wrap-Up

There's no question that 2011 was a truly seismic year for reproductive rights in the U.S. More than 60 laws damaging women's access to reproductive health care passed in 24 states, an unprecedented assault on women's health care. And this year, the powerful aftershock has further strained women's reproductive autonomy. As of July, 15 states had already passed around 40 harmful laws—marking another year of unbridled animosity toward women.

URL: 
http://reproductiverights.org/sites/crr.civicactions.net/files/documents/USLP_midyear_7.18.12_v3.pdf

The State of Women of Color in the United States

Issue brief from the Center for American Progress:

This issue brief examines the state of women of color in the United States at large in regards to four key areas: the workplace wage gap, health, educational attainment, and political leadership. While conversations in the mainstream media would suggest that women of color are a monolithic entity, it is important to note that women of color are a diverse group with a variety of experiences. We offer specific data points on various racial and ethnic groups where available as we present the issues of greatest importance to women of color today, but remember that data are not always available for direct comparisons of different groups of women of color compared to their white counterparts.

 

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2012/07/women_of_color_brief.html
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