Health, Reproductive Rights & Sexuality

Full equality for women and girls can be attained only when they have the information and services they need to lead healthy lives and make informed and independent decisions about their health, reproductive health and sexuality. Health for women depends on many factors, including access to safe water and nutritious food; affordable care and insurance; disease prevention and access to comprehensive reproductive and maternal health services; and awareness and support for women with HIV/AIDS and other diseases and disabilities. Health is not limited to physical well-being but extends to sexuality, mental health and body image as well. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Earning Their Way to Healthier Lives Women First in Mozambique

 A complex matrix of factors, such as low literacy, early sexual initiation, and limited economic opportunities, increases the vulnerability of women to HIV infection in Mozambique. The Women First program addresses the role that poverty and lack of access to health information play in the spread of HIV through legal rights and income-generating activities.

This case study was prepared by the AIDSTAR-One project. As an AIDSTAR-One partner organization, ICRW provided technical oversight on this publication. The full case studies series and findings are available at AIDSTAR-One.

Saranga Jain, Margaret Greene, Zayid Douglas, Myra Betron, Katherine Fritz
2011

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/earning-their-way-healthier-lives

Partner Violence and Girls’ Educational and Vocational Development

Partner Violence and Girls’ Educational and Vocational Development:

URL: 
http://csws.uoregon.edu/?p=12330

School Policies and Practices to Improve Health and Prevent Obesity

 National Elementary School Survey Results, School Years 2006–07 through 2009–10

URL: 
http://www.rwjf.org/childhoodobesity/product.jsp?id=73923&cid=XEM_205602

U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: National Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity

Rates down among all racial and ethnic groups; disparities persist
 
Teen pregnancies have declined dramatically in the United States since their peak in the early 1990s, as have the births and abortions that result; in 2008, teen pregnancies reached their lowest level in nearly 40 years, according to “U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions, 2008: National Trends by Age, Race and Ethnicity,” by Kathryn Kost and Stanley Henshaw of the Guttmacher Institute. In 2008, the teen pregnancy rate was 67.8 pregnancies per 1,000 women aged 15–19, which means that about 7% of U.S. teens became pregnant that year. This rate represents a 42% decline from the peak in 1990 (116.9 per 1,000).
URL: 
http://www.guttmacher.org/media/nr/2012/02/08/index.html

Reproductive Laws for the Twenty First Century

 In 2012, the Center for Women Policy Studies published the Reproductive Laws for the Twenty First Century Papers. In 1989, the Center launchedThe Law and Pregnancy Program: Implementing Policies for Women’s Reproductive Rights and Healthas the “second stage” of the groundbreakingProject on Reproductive Laws for the 1990s* at the Women’s Rights Litigation Clinic and the Institute for Research on Women at Rutgers University.

URL: 
http://www.centerwomenpolicy.org/programs/health/statepolicy/2012ReproLaws21stCentury.asp
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