Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM)

Since the 2001 release of Re:Gender's (formerly NCRW) seminal publication "Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology?" women have made significant strides in STEM-related studies and careers. However, progress in some areas has fallen short, particularly in technical fields – engineering, biochemistry and computer science/technology – in which women are still largely under-represented. The barriers and obstacles to women’s advancement are numerous and complex including gender bias, lack of mentoring and economic hardship. Efforts need to be stepped up to reduce these constraints. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Advancing Girls in STEM: An NCGS Symposium

Date/Time: 
06/21/2011

There is so much talk about helping girls move forward in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) subjects that you may wonder: "Is there more we could be doing?" The answer is YES.

We must ensure that at every stage of girls' education, we are most effectively engaging and retaining girls in the STEM pipeline. Join us as we convene the key players in girls and STEM, both in and out of school time, public and private, to create and strengthen bridges between and among girls' schools, colleges and the professional world.

On June 21st, 2011 at Wellesley College, the National Coalition of Girls' will host an event for K-12 educators that will highlight nationally-renowned speakers, present original research, and share innovative ways to engage and retain
girls in the STEM fields.

How to Write Successful Grants to Advance Women in Science

Date/Time: 
04/26/2011

The National Women's Studies Association is pleased to offer an interactive audiovisual workshop on how to successfully navigate the National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant process. ADVANCE grants are intended to increase the participation and advancement of women in academic and science engineering careers.

Led by successful NSF ADVANCE grant-seekers, this webinar is designed to offer useful insight into the grant-seeking process. Participants can expect to learn how to develop and cultivate collaborations between women's studies and the sciences and how to write successful grants.

NWSA offers this ongoing series of professional development trainings to support women’s studies and women’s center professionals and strengthen the field.

DATE: Tuesday, April 26
TIME: 4:00-5:15 PM Eastern
FEE: $75 members, $100 non-members

“False Start: A Missed Opportunity for Women and Girls in STEM in the Race to the Top Awards”

COCHRANVILLE, PA (3/29/11)

NAPE Report Indicates Missed Opportunity to Prepare Women and Girls for STEM Careers

URL: 
http://www.ncrw.org/content/false-start-missed-opportunity-women-and-girls-stem-race-top-awards

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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Staying Competitive: Patching America's Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences

Premier science largely depends on the quality of the pool of future scientists. For this reason the United States has made a major effort over the past 30 years to attract more outstanding U.S. students, particularly women, into research science. Women have risen to the challenge with significant increases in all physical sciences and engineering, and they have made a huge advance in the life sciences, where they now receive more than 50 percent of all Ph.D.s. Women now represent a large part of the talent pool for research science, but many data sources indicate that they are more likely than men to “leak” out of the pipeline in the sciences before obtaining tenure at a college or university. The loss of these women, together with serious increases in European and Asian nations’ capacity for research, means the long-term dependability of a highly trained U.S. workforce and global preeminence in the sciences may be in question. 

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/11/women_and_sciences.html

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership 2011

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Show this event in the event archives
02/28/2011

 

 

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership:
NCRW 2011 Afternoon Program

Please join the National Council for Research on Women and a panel of visionary leaders for an in-depth exploration of the most pressing issues of our time. This year’s program, Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership, will grapple with the uneven progress women are making both educationally and in their career trajectory:

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Dr. Mariko Chang is the author of the new book, Shortchanged: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It, and the main author of the March 2010 report “Lifting as We Climb Women of Color, Wealth, and America’s Future.” Dr. Chang has a PhD in Sociology from Stanford University and was an Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University from 1998 to 2007 where she published work on occupational sex segregation across countries, the use of social networks for gathering financial information and began her work on the gender wealth gap. To help raise awareness of the wealth gap, she maintains a website that provides data and other information on wealth, assets, and debt for public policy makers, the media, researchers, and organizations that address economic security.
 

Location

Boston, MA
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W
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