Women's & Girls' Leadership

From prime ministers to grass roots organizers, women and girls are attaining leadership positions in increasing numbers across government, civil society and the economy. But the glass ceiling is still firmly in place in many countries including in the US, where women are still vastly under-represented in government and senior leadership positions. Explore the resources listed below, including Related Categories links, or use the Keyword Search for more information.

Name It. Change It.

Name It. Change It. is a non-partisan project of WCF Foundation, Women’s Media Center, and Political Parity.

Together, we will work to end sexist and misogynistic coverage of women candidates by all members of the press—from bloggers to radio hosts to television pundits.

Why?

Widespread sexism in the media is one of the top problems facing women. A highly toxic media environment persists for women candidates, often negatively affecting their campaigns. The ever-changing media landscape creates an unmonitored echo chamber, often allowing damaging comments to exist without accountability.

URL: 
http://www.nameitchangeit.com/

Invisible Market Energy and Agricultural Technologies for Women's Economic Advancement

This research explores what it takes for technology initiatives, specifically in the energy and agricultural sectors, to reach and economically benefit women in developing countries through market-based strategies that have the potential for achieving scale and financial sustainability. It builds on ICRW’s landmark paper, Bridging the Gender Divide: How Technology Can Advance Women Economically, which made the case for how technologies can create pathways for strengthening women’s economic opportunities.

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/invisible-market

High Potentials in the Pipeline: Leaders Pay it Forward

Catalyst's longitudinal project, The Promise of Future Leadership: Highly Talented Employees in the Pipeline, develops timely reports on the retention and advancement of high potential women and men. The project surveys graduates of leading business schools in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia, with the intent of assessing their career values, goals, and expectations, the developmental opportunities afforded them, and their strategies for managing work and family life. The reports highlight the differences in women's and men's career experiences and satisfaction; some feature perspectives from global leaders and other experts.

URL: 
http://catalyst.org/publication/534/42/high-potentials-in-the-pipeline-leaders-pay-it-forward
Member Organization: 

Desiring Change

Desire and gender are brought alive through the ways lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and intersexed people use their bodies; desire and gender are made poignant and meaningful by the ways we construct or deny our erotic passions and gendered identities in the course of daily life. People will take risks—facing marginalization, isolation, and even violence—to identify and act upon their desires. And they will live out their unique understanding of gender—no matter how dangerous or costly the results. This report represents the integration of joint efforts by the Barnard Center for Research on Women (BCRW) and Queers for Economic Justice (QEJ), beginning with activist and academic convenings that took place from 2005-07 under the name “Desiring Change,” and culminating in a daylong gathering in 2007 with 21 social justice organizations.
URL: 
http://bcrw.barnard.edu/publications/nfs7/report/
Member Organization: 

Small Business Lessons of the Recession

Many of today’s women-owned businesses (WOBs) are led by recession-tested entrepreneurs whose experiences provide valuable insight into the challenges that may await aspiring small business owners. A new study released by Chase Card Services, a division of JPMorgan Chase & Co., NFIB and the Center for Women's Business Research, looks at how women small business owners performed during the “Great Recession.”

URL: 
http://www.nfib.com/wobstudy
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